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NewOpti

@optonline.net

Just Got Opt Static IP Service....Can I do DHCP??

Hi I just got static IP Service....My question though I have the Static IP's can I just link up something that just needs DHCP and get a DHCP addres?

Seems odd that I can't do both?

But want to confirm if I get my own wifi router I can hook that into the modem/router, give my router static ip, but set it for dhcp for devices I plug in to it so they work that way. I have few tv type devices that only connect via dhcp and want to be able to do testing with them and or somehow force a natted ip to them?

Also, as an FYI I made them give me one of the newer modems that is also a router..Seemed pretty stupid to me that a) they have a two box system modem/router and bulky.....b) How come we can't get a router that has wifi??? while home users with less expensive package gets free wifi routers??? I was told their wifi routers can't do static ip...which seems odd.

Looking forward to comments/suggests

Merry Xmas



swintec
Premium,VIP
join:2003-12-19
Alfred, ME
kudos:5
Reviews:
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If you are going to use your own router, you should set your modem / router combo unit from Optimum into bridge mode. This will disable the router functions. Then you can plug your own router into the modem like always and your router will use DHCP to give local IP addresses out to the equipment that connects to it.

Unless the Opt. static add-on includes multiple IP addresses in a bundle?
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frdrizzt

join:2008-05-03
Ronkonkoma, NY
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
reply to NewOpti

said by NewOpti :

Hi I just got static IP Service....My question though I have the Static IP's can I just link up something that just needs DHCP and get a DHCP addres?

Seems odd that I can't do both?

But want to confirm if I get my own wifi router I can hook that into the modem/router, give my router static ip, but set it for dhcp for devices I plug in to it so they work that way. I have few tv type devices that only connect via dhcp and want to be able to do testing with them and or somehow force a natted ip to them?

Also, as an FYI I made them give me one of the newer modems that is also a router..Seemed pretty stupid to me that a) they have a two box system modem/router and bulky.....b) How come we can't get a router that has wifi??? while home users with less expensive package gets free wifi routers??? I was told their wifi routers can't do static ip...which seems odd.

Looking forward to comments/suggests

Merry Xmas

You can't configure the Optimum router in any way. Think of it like your cable modem, except it only gives out static IP addresses. Whatever is plugged directly into the cisco 851 router must have its WAN port configured to get one of the static IP addresses.

If you connect a wireless router to the Cisco 851 (into any of the ports FE0-FE3) you would configure that wireless router to get a static WAN address. You would keep your wireless router's DHCP server enabled to automatically give out private addresses to get online. When you take your laptop, connect to the wireless network and you will get a 192.168 address from your router which will show a public address from the IP range provided by CV (specifically, the one you configured for your wireless router) .

edit: Missed the fact that you had the Cisco DPQ3925 modem/gateway. Slight changes, you connect your wireless router into any port on the modem, and configure it the same way as I described above.

The home router is a residential Netgear model,and can't do half the things the Cisco equipment can. It can't run the configuration required to use the static IP service.


jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online

4 edits
reply to NewOpti

The static IP service has 5 IP addresses available for your devices.
You cannot put the modem in "bridge" mode - no configuration is available to the customer.

You can get your own router that will give out DHCP addresses as described above. If you get a wireless router, you will also have the ability to connect devices wirelessly. I can't remember the last home I was in that did not have wireless.

It is also very likely your "tv type" devices can be configured with static IP addresses. xbox, wii, sony tv, samsung tv, network printers, and every other wired network device I have configured has the ability to configure for static IP. If you tell is the specific device, we can probably help you configure it with a static IP.

While it is certainly possible to have a wireless device connect with a static IP address, it is very unusual. Their wireless routers can be used with the static IP service, the same as a wireless router you can buy. Their router can also do static IP assignment merely by assigning a static IP to the device within the router's subnet. It does not make sense for laptops, phones, ipads, etc that are portable and will be connecting to different networks. It might be useful for a fixed device like a TV where this is no network wire available. But most NAT routers that assign IP addresses will do "address reservation" so the device can get a specific address via DHCP - wired or wireless devices.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.



swintec
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Alfred, ME
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said by jaa:

The static IP service has 5 IP addresses available for your devices.
You cannot put the modem in "bridge" mode - no configuration is available to the customer.

Will support, or upper levels of support bridge the units? I know that is what most Time Warner users of the new DOCSIS 3 tiers need to have done. Would just be nice to disable that part completely so you can have just a modem with your own router.

I guess I dont understand if the OP is looking to have his devices connect by getting private IP addresses (192.168....) or if he wants to use his 5 static public IP addresses.
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jaa
Premium
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Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online

2 edits

said by swintec:

said by jaa:

The static IP service has 5 IP addresses available for your devices.
You cannot put the modem in "bridge" mode - no configuration is available to the customer.

Will support, or upper levels of support bridge the units? I know that is what most Time Warner users of the new DOCSIS 3 tiers need to have done. Would just be nice to disable that part completely so you can have just a modem with your own router.

I guess I dont understand if the OP is looking to have his devices connect by getting private IP addresses (192.168....) or if he wants to use his 5 static public IP addresses.

No, they will not. Many people connect their own wireless NAT router directly to the CV-supplied modem/router combination. There is no configuration of the CV device required - simply assign one of the public static IPs to the customer router.

If he wants to use his 5 public static IPs, he can simply connect the devices to the modem (needs a switch if he runs out of ports) and configure each device with a static IP. He can also put a DHCP server on the network to assign the 5 IP addresses via DHCP if he wants - he said a limitation of some devices is no static IP support. Can also connect a wireless access point to the network to connect wireless devices.

I can't think of something someone would want to do that would require configuration of the CV device. Connecting his wifi router the way he described will work fine.

There is no DHCP server supplied by CV with the static IP service.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.

TheWiseGuy
Dog And Butterfly
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reply to swintec

I suspect it is already in what you would call bridge mode. It does not do NAT. It simply is there to allow for a default gateway for the static IP addresses in the subnet assigned. There is no need for any user configuration, it is like any of the million routers on the Internet.

The user can add a router and use NAT for devices connected to that router.
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Warning, If you post nonsense and use misinformation and are here to argue based on those methods, you will be put on ignore.



swintec
Premium,VIP
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Alfred, ME
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Reviews:
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said by TheWiseGuy:

I suspect it is already in what you would call bridge mode. It does not do NAT. It simply is there to allow for a default gateway for the static IP addresses in the subnet assigned.

Oh. I had thought it was similar to the other combo units that a lot of the companies give out.
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TheWiseGuy
Dog And Butterfly
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-04
East Stroudsburg, PA
kudos:3

It can be set up for NAT but for the static service it is simply a default gateway for the five public IP addresses.


efrem

join:2002-04-03
Westport, CT
reply to swintec

said by swintec:

Oh. I had thought it was similar to other combo units that a lot of the companies give out.

If you are referring to the Cisco DPQ3925 then yes, it is similar to the other combo units in that it does have much much more functionality and many features. Here is Cisco's user guide: »www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/video/a···93_B.pdf

However, Cablevision crippled this device to limit endusers from making any use of such capabilities. There's a previous thread about this at »Cisco DPQ3925 admin page? . In that thread the CV employees and fanboys jumped all over me for merely suggesting that I wanted the fully functional device. They even missed the sarcasm with which I offered to hire them to assist me.

Happy Holidays to all!


jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online

That was an excellent thread, explaining why it would not be in the customer's or CV's interest to allow end users to configure cablevision equipment.

Here is post from that thread that summarizes it well: »Re: Cisco DPQ3925 admin page?
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.


lestat99

join:2000-08-04
Piscataway, NJ
reply to NewOpti

said by NewOpti :

Hi I just got static IP Service....My question though I have the Static IP's can I just link up something that just needs DHCP and get a DHCP addres?

Merry Xmas

Have you had any luck getting the Optimum TV app working with your Business (Static IP) service? So far I have not and it doesn't seem to be supported (in my area at least)
Expand your moderator at work

frdrizzt

join:2008-05-03
Ronkonkoma, NY
kudos:1
reply to lestat99

Re: Just Got Opt Static IP Service....Can I do DHCP??

The Optimum App can't do anything but DVR management & TV listing lookups on business/municipal/school/library type accounts.


efrem

join:2002-04-03
Westport, CT
reply to jaa

said by jaa:

That was an excellent thread, explaining why it would not be in the customer's or CV's interest to allow end users to configure cablevision equipment.

Hmmm. Better for CV, yes. But better for customers? LOL. In what universe would that be?


jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online

said by efrem:

said by jaa:

That was an excellent thread, explaining why it would not be in the customer's or CV's interest to allow end users to configure cablevision equipment.

Hmmm. Better for CV, yes. But better for customers? LOL. In what universe would that be?

It is explained here. »Re: Cisco DPQ3925 admin page?

An absolute mightmare for the customer. Good thing CV has the box locked down so customers that don't know any better can't screw themselves.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.

efrem

join:2002-04-03
Westport, CT

said by jaa:

An absolute mightmare for the customer. Good thing CV has the box locked down so customers that don't know any better can't screw themselves.

Well, since this device and product are for Business Accounts, not Residential Accounts, perhaps most customers won't suffer from the nightmares that you must be having.

frdrizzt

join:2008-05-03
Ronkonkoma, NY
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Optimum Online

Businesses hav all sorts of network requirements. Rather than have CV configure their device assuming a specific configuration, they do not configure anything with your LAN. Also, it makes it easier to determine fault if there is a problem. If there is an issue with the the LAN connection, it is always your equipment. If the LAN is fine and the internet is not working, assuming it's not an IP address/IP configuration issue, it is an issue that you need to contact CV to resolve.



jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online
reply to efrem

said by efrem:

said by jaa:

An absolute mightmare for the customer. Good thing CV has the box locked down so customers that don't know any better can't screw themselves.

Well, since this device and product are for Business Accounts, not Residential Accounts, perhaps most customers won't suffer from the nightmares that you must be having.

That is a good point. Even if allowed, no business customer would be stupid enough to configure the device - most have tech support professionals that would know better.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.

efrem

join:2002-04-03
Westport, CT

said by jaa:

said by efrem:

said by jaa:

An absolute mightmare for the customer. Good thing CV has the box locked down so customers that don't know any better can't screw themselves.

Well, since this device and product are for Business Accounts, not Residential Accounts, perhaps most customers won't suffer from the nightmares that you must be having.

That is a good point. Even if allowed, no business customer would be stupid enough to configure the device - most have tech support professionals that would know better.

It sounds like you have zero respect for any and all business customers you might know. I know quite a few OOL customers, both business and residential, that are more than capable of handling the basic configurations of this specific device, such as:

1)a wireless network
2)a basic SPI firewall
3)a VPN
4)single port forwarding or redirection
5)port range forwarding
6)etc.

It sure would be nice if OOL allowed us to use that one device (Cisco DPQ3925) to accomplish all of the above built-in functions.


jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online

I have a lot of respect for networking professionals. Of course they "could" configure a networking device, but none would consider configuring CV equipment.

The service agreement does not include a specific model of equipment, and could change at any time. Therefore, the replacement equipment would, best case, have to be reconfigured. Worst case, the equipment may not even have the same capabilities.

Therefore, any competent networking professional would not configure the CV equipment (even if permitted), but rather would treat it as a "black box" providing service as specified in the CV agreement. To do otherwise would be irresponsible and, if they claim to be a business networking professional, negligent.

It would be terrible if CV permitted their device to be configured by the customer or their contractors, because some just might do it!

How would all those business customers you know handle CV coming out on a "no internet" service call, and replacing their failed box with an ACME 8176b?
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.


frdrizzt

join:2008-05-03
Ronkonkoma, NY
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Optimum Online

If CV replaces their modem, it would require reconfiguration of the entire business network if utilizing a built-in router. You are not guaranteed to get the same model of modem, and so an import of settings may not be possible. At least if a router fails, a somewhat technical (not requiring a computer geek) person can take the backup of your router settings that is (hopefully) saved somewhere and import the config file. It would take a lot more effort for the average person, who despite what you think has no desire and/or knowledge about doing anything other than plugging in a router to the modem and hoping it works. A lot of people are perfectly capable at following directions, but I can't even count the number of business owners, employees, or homeowners that wanted CV to set up their entire network.

Both sides have benefits, but since CV doesn't support your network, I'm sure they simply don't want to be liable for the cost of someone hiring an IT person to reconfigure their network settings if a modem fails.



jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
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Reviews:
·Vonage
·Optimum Online

A business that relies on their router would have a backup of their config file, and another router readily available - either their support company would have it, or they would have one themselves. A competent networking professional would insist upon it.

CV makes no guarantee that they will replace the router with the same device, or even a device with the same capability.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.