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stevek1949
We're not in Kansas anymore
Premium
join:2002-11-13
Virginia Beach, VA
reply to Antonica

Re: Buying a Home. What's your Checklist?

said by Antonica:

Home built in 1979.

This was prime time for polybutylene piping. Ask if the home has that for water service, including the service line from the meter (if there is one). This should be a disclosure item for the seller.


macsierra8
Baby Newfoundland
Premium
join:2003-11-30
Minden, NV
reply to Archivis

Good points in this thread BTW. At the top of my checklist would be, stay away from any HOA association. Of course that's my opinion but some might differ and that's OK.

As a contractor that's worked for HOA's many years and still do it's a big expense for any homeowner to belong to one. IMO, HOA's are like being married to 40 women and trying to keep them all happy. Just ain't gonna work..



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by macsierra8:

Good points in this thread BTW. At the top of my checklist would be, stay away from any HOA association. Of course that's my opinion but some might differ and that's OK.

As a contractor that's worked for HOA's many years and still do it's a big expense for any homeowner to belong to one. IMO, HOA's are like being married to 40 women and trying to keep them all happy. Just ain't gonna work..

It depends on the HOA. In a deed restricted community of houses a HOA is terrible. For a condo if run properly it can be great. Our FL rental is a condo and the HOA is a god sent. If for nothing more then to handle all the outside maintenance, cable TV, water, & insurance it's worth it every month. Like any property knowledge is power. Research anything before you buy from zoning to HOA to schools.


Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to stevek1949

said by stevek1949:

said by Antonica:

Home built in 1979.

This was prime time for polybutylene piping. Ask if the home has that for water service, including the service line from the meter (if there is one). This should be a disclosure item for the seller.

The seller is only required to disclose stuff they know about. Typically the seller won't do anything that might negatively impact the sale so if they don't know off hand aka not in the disclosures then they won't find out if asked. You'd be surprised how much stuff isn't on the disclosure that should be.


Snakeoil
Ignore Button. The coward's feature.
Premium
join:2000-08-05
Mentor, OH
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

After we got burned by this [as sellers], I'd request a mold inspector as a buyer.
We had out old house on the market for nearly a year. We only had 4 potential buyers. The last one asked for a mold inspection, and the results were that our house had black mold. The estimate to clean it up started at 20 thousand and could have possibly cost more by the time the job was finished.
We wrote a letter to the bank[intent to quit], and included our keys with the letter.
During the time we were selling the GA home, we had already moved into our OH home.

So have a mold inspection done.

**Edit**

Also wait for dry weather. Reason being is our current house has a mini swamp in the back yard. My wife didn't see it, because the weather was wet, so the lawn was soft. If she had looked when it was dry, she would have seen the thicker greener grass. The water table is high in my part of OH. So we have a sump pump in the basement that pumps out water about every 45 minutes. The former home owner ran a short drain pipe in the yard, so the water pools about 10-15 feet from the house. It's a fun spot for the lawn mower [slippery muddy driving].
--
Is a person a failure for doing nothing? Or is he a failure for trying, and not succeeding at what he is attempting to do? What did you fail at today?.



bionicRod
Funkier than a mohair disco ball.
Premium
join:2009-07-06
united state
kudos:2
reply to Archivis

If you have a yard, even if it's fenced in, get a survey done on the property. I didn't, and it turns out that that half of my yard is actually someone else's property even though it has been fenced this way since the 80s. I regret not getting it done beforehand.



I_H8_Spam

join:2004-03-10
St Catharines, ON

A family friend purchased a home back in the early 90's in a area of Fort Erie called Crescent Park, nice lots size. However they had huge backyard flooding problems, pretty much a bog for 8 months of the year.

Turns out there used to be a full sized cement in-ground pool, The old owners knocked the sides a bit, filled it with broken cement, the old pump/filter, lines and even the original fencing. Washed there hands and sold the place some years later with no disclosure.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to bionicRod

said by bionicRod:

If you have a yard, even if it's fenced in, get a survey done on the property. I didn't, and it turns out that that half of my yard is actually someone else's property even though it has been fenced this way since the 80s. I regret not getting it done beforehand.

A survey confirmed my 6.15 acre lot instead of the 5.861 the town had on their map. It was originally 5.861 but had to be adjusted due to setback requirements. The maps in the town records were just not updated... until I had my survey done.

Why is this important? Well, certain zoning requirements require a certain lot size. Where I might have been just scraping by before I am now fully in the clear.


macsierra8
Baby Newfoundland
Premium
join:2003-11-30
Minden, NV
reply to Spork35

said by Spork35:

It depends on the HOA. In a deed restricted community of houses a HOA is terrible. For a condo if run properly it can be great. Our FL rental is a condo and the HOA is a god sent. If for nothing more then to handle all the outside maintenance, cable TV, water, & insurance it's worth it every month. Like any property knowledge is power. Research anything before you buy from zoning to HOA to schools.

That a new one to me.. You should feel lucky.. Every condo association (including time share) we do work for in California & Nevada have deed restrictions and endless meetings with stupid rules and no exceptions I know of..
--
Jimmy Hoffa’s dad was the last shovel-ready job..
Will Rodgers never met Harry Reid..

Why was I Anti-Obama before it was cool?
Saul Alinsky was also a community organizer & Marxist..


Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by macsierra8:

said by Spork35:

It depends on the HOA. In a deed restricted community of houses a HOA is terrible. For a condo if run properly it can be great. Our FL rental is a condo and the HOA is a god sent. If for nothing more then to handle all the outside maintenance, cable TV, water, & insurance it's worth it every month. Like any property knowledge is power. Research anything before you buy from zoning to HOA to schools.

That a new one to me.. You should feel lucky.. Every condo association (including time share) we do work for in California & Nevada have deed restrictions and endless meetings with stupid rules and no exceptions I know of..

The real issue with HOA's is there's no requirements on how they are run or what's included in them. Our CT rental HOA is about the same price as the FL HOA yet it doesn't include cable or water. The only thing you can count on in an HOA is some kind of shared use item(s). In my parents case their HOA is just for lighting the division sign and maintenance on the private lake which all the house abut. In a condo/townhouse case they typically include insurance, outside maintenance, common item(s) like a small park, grill, dog run, gym, pool, spa, etc. plus sometimes they can form a large collective to get a better rate on services like water or cable. In the FL condo's case those "stupid rules" are what makes the rental a HOT item. They hold quarterly meetings but you can do everything via mail with a proxy so we never attend meetings. Our tenants *love* the rules as they keep the property impeccably clean & quiet. In the CT condo's case they have almost no rules. As a landlord or rental property we prefer HOA's highly. As a renter or owner we only like HOA's that are top notch. I'd guess about 80-85% of HOA's are trash but the ones that are done right are outstanding.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to bionicRod

said by bionicRod:

If you have a yard, even if it's fenced in, get a survey done on the property. I didn't, and it turns out that that half of my yard is actually someone else's property even though it has been fenced this way since the 80s. I regret not getting it done beforehand.

I'm surprised the sellers didn't supply a previous survey (and should have been a recent one too).

Here in Canada, banks require a recent survey of the property, the notary takes care of that.


Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to bionicRod

said by bionicRod:

If you have a yard, even if it's fenced in, get a survey done on the property. I didn't, and it turns out that that half of my yard is actually someone else's property even though it has been fenced this way since the 80s. I regret not getting it done beforehand.

Actually if you have maintained that land for 7 years or more you can go to court and claim that land as yours. (adverse possession)


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

1 recommendation

reply to Spork35

said by Spork35:

I'd guess about 80-85% of HOA's are trash but the ones that are done right are outstanding.

I say 100 percent of them are anti-American as they usurp your property rights by being able to dictate how and what you do with your property. I value my rights way more than allowing a HOA to control me.
Expand your moderator at work


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

1 recommendation

reply to Archivis

Re: Buying a Home. What's your Checklist?

Don't forget this one from a realtor buddy of mine (ok, ex-realtor):

-Never buy a home that is located on a street with a double line!

(LOL, try backing out of your driveway... good luck!)
--
Splat



macsierra8
Baby Newfoundland
Premium
join:2003-11-30
Minden, NV
reply to Spork35

said by Spork35:

As a renter or owner we only like HOA's that are top notch. I'd guess about 80-85% of HOA's are trash but the ones that are done right are outstanding.

I agree, with good property management HOA's can work well. The trouble with some is the folks on the HOA board ALWAYS think they know more than the professionals who do the work. They always take the lowest bid and sometimes fail to check if the contractor even has a valid license. I could go on... But their lawyer$ love it..
--
Jimmy Hoffa’s dad was the last shovel-ready job..
Will Rodgers never met Harry Reid..

Why was I Anti-Obama before it was cool?
Saul Alinsky was also a community organizer & Marxist..


nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting
reply to Jack_in_VA

I think it's a lifestyle decision. Some people like bland "cookie cutter" neighbourhoods where everything is the same and strictly marshaled. I know for a fact that there are people who enjoy living in these type of areas. I have several relatives in Florida who all live in these types of communities. God bless them.

I, for one, would go absolutely insane. I don't want anybody making aesthetic decisions for me. I certainly wouldn't want to pay for this "benefit".

I do believe that many HOA's are illegal because they try to usurp constitutional rights in lieu of their micro-government bylaws. IMO, a HOA is a governing body, and should be held to strict accountability when it comes to peoples rights (like any other form of gubbamin).
But, many people buy into these places knowing full well what they are getting into, and then bitch and moan when things don't go their way.
--
...because I care.



dogma
XYZ
Premium
join:2002-08-15
Boulder City, NV
kudos:1

said by nunya:

I think it's a lifestyle decision. Some people like bland "cookie cutter" neighbourhoods where everything is the same and strictly marshaled. ...

But, many people buy into these places knowing full well what they are getting into, and then bitch and moan when things don't go their way.

...continuing on with more HOA discussion for your buck night, We have a place here that's in not one, but 2 HOA's. One within the other. One is the "Master Planned Community", and the one within that is the development. 2 different HOA bills.

We have another place here that's a non-HOA property.

The HOA(s) are strict; Lawn cut, no weeds, no debris, no change of original exterior paint color, minimum 2 trees (from a list of "approved" trees) in the front, exterior facing internal window coverings must be white, RV's can only park on the street for 24hours, no oil spots...of any diameter.. on the driveways, etc. But it's nice and quiet and and boring and consistent, which attracts a certain set of neighbors.

The other place is a 5 acre spread in which the surrounding "environment" is best described as the Wild Wild West. The 2 immediate neighbors to our North built beautiful custom homes. The neighbors to our South live in a 70's style DIY Geodesic dome type of affair, and the folks next to them live in an old semi-converted Continental Trailways bus interconnected with a trailer home leveled on railroad ties as well as 4 "sheds" (some used as housing, one used to store ammo. A lot of ammo.). The property behind them has a outdoor regulation basketball court complete with lights. Bright lights. Very bright lights. Evidently for the Midnight B-Ball league. Many neighbors have ATV's...and long gravel driveways which cause massive mini dust storms. Lotsa' horses around here, but the "unwritten rule" is: If it's in the street in front of your property, you gotta clean it up. This "freedom" also attracts a certain set of neighbors.

...and I love it! But my wife doesn't. Thus we live in the HOA.


Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to cableties

said by cableties:

Don't forget this one from a realtor buddy of mine (ok, ex-realtor):

-Never buy a home that is located on a street with a double line!

(LOL, try backing out of your driveway... good luck!)

You don't back out of your driveway in that case. LOL


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

I'd hate being on such a street not for backing out of the driveway, but well... busy fast car street.

Double line usually = 25mph speed limit and being a main street for local traffic.

I love my near-dead-end street where I never hear teenagers with broken mufflers speed through, or cars stop and go every 30 seconds.



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by alkizmo:

I'd hate being on such a street not for backing out of the driveway, but well... busy fast car street.

Double line usually = 25mph speed limit and being a main street for local traffic.

I love my near-dead-end street where I never hear teenagers with broken mufflers speed through, or cars stop and go every 30 seconds.

Generalization never seem to work. Having lived on a 40 mph road it's no different then another street really. The time and gas you waste to get to the main road we save. When your snowed in we're plowed out. When you lose power we have it. When we need emergency services they arrive faster. It's all perspective and very different for each situation.

FYI; It's fun when a cop knocks on your door and asks if they can sit in your driveway to nail speeders. You can sit there and have free fun!
Expand your moderator at work


Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1

Re: Buying a Home. What's your Checklist?

Chimney was just cleaned last year and it's only used for the propane fireplace. Electric heat

Expand your moderator at work


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Spork35

Re: Buying a Home. What's your Checklist?

said by Spork35:

said by alkizmo:

I'd hate being on such a street not for backing out of the driveway, but well... busy fast car street.

Double line usually = 25mph speed limit and being a main street for local traffic.

I love my near-dead-end street where I never hear teenagers with broken mufflers speed through, or cars stop and go every 30 seconds.

Generalization never seem to work. Having lived on a 40 mph road it's no different then another street really. The time and gas you waste to get to the main road we save. When your snowed in we're plowed out. When you lose power we have it. When we need emergency services they arrive faster. It's all perspective and very different for each situation.

FYI; It's fun when a cop knocks on your door and asks if they can sit in your driveway to nail speeders. You can sit there and have free fun!

I live at the end of a cul-de-sac. I absolutely love it. Fewer cars and less noise.

Emergency services? The fire chief lives next door! Snow plow is not a problem, they plow all the way to the end of the development.

Power outages are not a problem, that's what they make generators for. All of our wiring is underground so there's less chance of bad weather killing power to just my house. Usually it's the feeders that get whacked and once they restore those the whole subdivision lights back up.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to nunya

said by nunya:

I do believe that many HOA's are illegal because they try to usurp constitutional rights in lieu of their micro-government bylaws. IMO, a HOA is a governing body, and should be held to strict accountability when it comes to peoples rights (like any other form of gubbamin).
But, many people buy into these places knowing full well what they are getting into, and then bitch and moan when things don't go their way.

HOAs are like PayPal.

PayPal is not a bank, yet walks and talks like one.

HOAs are not a Government, yet they do everything like one.


Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

said by Spork35:

said by alkizmo:

I'd hate being on such a street not for backing out of the driveway, but well... busy fast car street.

Double line usually = 25mph speed limit and being a main street for local traffic.

I love my near-dead-end street where I never hear teenagers with broken mufflers speed through, or cars stop and go every 30 seconds.

Generalization never seem to work. Having lived on a 40 mph road it's no different then another street really. The time and gas you waste to get to the main road we save. When your snowed in we're plowed out. When you lose power we have it. When we need emergency services they arrive faster. It's all perspective and very different for each situation.

FYI; It's fun when a cop knocks on your door and asks if they can sit in your driveway to nail speeders. You can sit there and have free fun!

I live at the end of a cul-de-sac. I absolutely love it. Fewer cars and less noise.

Emergency services? The fire chief lives next door! Snow plow is not a problem, they plow all the way to the end of the development.

Power outages are not a problem, that's what they make generators for. All of our wiring is underground so there's less chance of bad weather killing power to just my house. Usually it's the feeders that get whacked and once they restore those the whole subdivision lights back up.

You pay extra for the privilege to live on a cul-de-sac. Not everyone wants to do that.

Fire chief doesn't live next door to 99% of people nor does that mean anything in terms of speed in which a fire truck can arrive anywhere.

Again a generator is an extra thing you pay a LOT for the convenience. Most people aren't willing to foot that cost.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

We both work for the same agency.

Danger!!
said by Archivis:

I have enough seniority that even with lay-offs, I won't be going anywhere.

HaHa Famous last words!!
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
google this "(sqrt(cos(x))*cos(200*x)+sqrt(abs(x))-0.7)*(4-x*x)^0.01, sqrt(9-x^2), -sqrt(9-x^2)"


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to seederjed

said by seederjed:

Even though I'm single, my realtor stressed school district above all else.
She said you can change a house to make it better but you can't Make a bad school good.@

THIS THIS THIS
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
google this "(sqrt(cos(x))*cos(200*x)+sqrt(abs(x))-0.7)*(4-x*x)^0.01, sqrt(9-x^2), -sqrt(9-x^2)"


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to UHF

said by UHF:

I did not get a survey when I bought my home. I not want to put up a fence. \

Get a survey staked out before you move in. After you are there a while, it would not be neighborly to do so, but just moving in, you can tell them you were suspicious of the seller.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
google this "(sqrt(cos(x))*cos(200*x)+sqrt(abs(x))-0.7)*(4-x*x)^0.01, sqrt(9-x^2), -sqrt(9-x^2)"