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Name141

join:2006-09-02

BlueBird wireless vs Hughesnet.

Does anyone know anything about Bluebird wireless?

»www.bluebirdwireless.com/Service···ess.aspx

I'm finally in to position to where I could pay the $225 setup fee now. However, I don't know if it'd be better than hugesnet ? I know that paying $85 for a 475 MB download cap is just silly. It took me 11 to 13 days to download 15 GBs (Batman Arkham City) from Steam and another 3-4 days for the 9 GB games I purchased during the holiday sale.

Bluebird claims to have no caps and latency low enough to play the mulitplayer side of games. But I'm not sure if I'm buying it ?



WHT

join:2010-03-26
Rosston, TX
kudos:5

I'd look around for another WISP in your area. $225 install fee is twice as much as many other WISPs charge and for $50 you might get 2 or 3 times the speed.


Name141

join:2006-09-02

Here's what I found out from an employee:

It's 900 MHz, it's 512 kbps (62 KB/sec?) up and down. The latency is around 100ms he said and that higher options would be available at the end of the year.

I think I might try to ask for a higher option (such as 726 kbps. I'd feel more happy living with that) if they can give it to me for only about $10 more or so.

Anyway it's now $150 install fee with router (They claim is $70 router..) the customer owns the router and cabling but not the antenna and pole if needed.

All in all, it's sounding better than hughesnet besides the speed.

What do y'all think ?


jcremin

join:2009-12-22
Siren, WI
kudos:2

Other than the silly download cap, none of it sounds unreasonable to me, especially if you live in the middle of nowhere.

A lot of the 900mhz equipment isn't cheap. The stuff I use is $250 just for the antenna portion, and that doesn't include mounting, cabling, router, etc.

I charge a $150 install fee, but retain ownership of the antenna. The mount and cabling remains yours in case you cancel and ever want to sign up again (or if you sell the house and the new people want service), and then I give a discount on the reinstall.

The monthly fee is a bit on the high side, but not necessarily unreasonable depending on the size of the WISP and their options for dedicated bandwidth. If they are paying $200/meg, they can't sell it for $20/mo and ever expect to be successful.

Like I said, a bit high on the monthly, but reasonable for the install. Drop the silly cap and I'd take them over hughes in a heartbeat.


Name141

join:2006-09-02

Perhaps you misunderstood ? Bluebird is $60 a month with 512 kbps. I'm hoping I can push for a 726 kbps (96 KB/sec ?) for $70 if they'll let me. They have no caps , hughesnet is the one with the caps.

Also, they are claiming the website is out of date and it's now $150 for the install fee. What kind of ping/latency do you have ? Is it noticeable on Portal 2 or other FPS? How is it for streaming spotify or hulu ? I checked hulu and I think I'm going to have to use the 280p service (lowest option) at 512.


jcremin

join:2009-12-22
Siren, WI
kudos:2

Sorry, yes, I misunderstood about the caps... When I read your post the first time, I was distracted and accidentally read that the WISP had the silly cap... Makes more sense now.

With that confusion cleared up, yes, that sounds reasonable. Again, monthly pricing is higher than many WISP's, but still in the "reasonable" range for many rural areas. For instance, I charge $40 for 768k, a WISP a little closer to the nearest metro area charges a little less, and another WISP a little farther away charges a bit more.

The latency really depends on a lot of factors:

* The site you are testing to
* What they use for their primary source of bandwidth
* How many wireless hops you are from their main tower
* How many customers are on the same tower as you
* What your signals to the tower are
* And many other various things that can affect it.

Some of my customers have great connections and can run VoIP and other really low latency applications without any problems. But then there are others who are really far from the tower and their signal is barely enough to get them a reliable connection, but at the cost of latency.

There's really no way to say for sure how exactly your connection will perform until they do the initial survey to test signal strengths and speeds. But even a marginal connection through and over-saturated WISP is usually still MUCH better than any satellite connection.


Name141

join:2006-09-02

From what I have seen, if I'm right, they can hop off of other connections around the area (customers) to get me to the main tower as well instead of a direct line of sight if line of sight isn't possible ? Causing more latency ? I'm thinking that's what they'd have to do probably cause we're in a "whole" most companies say. One company using about the same tech came out and did a 70 foot measurement and couldn't keep a signal due to what they thought was chicken houses with metal roofs. So I'm not sure , and neither are they yet, they could keep a signal here.


jcremin

join:2009-12-22
Siren, WI
kudos:2

Some WISP's will use customers as relays, but most of the time if they are using 900mhz, it is to get a NLOS connection to the nearest tower. 900mhz will go through a fair amount of trees. I personally would frown upon customer-based relays because of the potential for issues. If done right, it can work well, but the best bet is almost always going to be a shot right to one of the towers, as they probably have a better backhaul, battery backup, etc.

Be sure to ask them those questions.


Name141

join:2006-09-02

So if they come out for a sight servery, I need to ask "Are you going to be able to do a direct connection to one of your towers?" pretty much?

BTW: this is one of their system admins »twitter.com/grcastleton

"Thuderstorms aren't as fun when you're a sysadmin - headed out to drop in a battery backup at a tower site that lost power." o.O


jcremin

join:2009-12-22
Siren, WI
kudos:2

said by Name141:

So if they come out for a sight servery, I need to ask "Are you going to be able to do a direct connection to one of your towers?" pretty much?

I would ask them as many questions as you can. The more they know about how you intend the use the connection, the better idea they will have on whether or not the signals they are able to get will support your needs. The last thing most WISP's want is an unhappy customer who might have been better served by someone else. While some will do anything to make the sale, I do turn some people away simply because I know I'm not the best option. My thinking is that if they are unhappy, that I turned them away, they'll 1 or 2 people. If they are unhappy because they think my service sucks, they'll tell 10 or more people.

said by Name141:

"Thuderstorms aren't as fun when you're a sysadmin - headed out to drop in a battery backup at a tower site that lost power." o.O

True story. Towers lose power and even worse sometimes. I personally keep some form of battery backup on EVERY tower of mine. They may or may not have battery backups on all towers, depending on how many customers there are on the tower, but they'll be much more likely to bring a battery backup or generator to a tower that has 5, 10, 20, or more customers on it than they will to a customer's house who is only relaying to 1 or 2 other people.

Name141

join:2006-09-02

Well from what I'm seeing now, the connection might just be a little slow for me.

Hulu's requirements are atleast 400 kbps (I'm assuming 280p is all?)

Spotify is only 256 kbps though.

But you add in someone else browsing on the living room computer, or the gaming computer updating and taking away half of that 512.. and you can't do much else but check email and browse till it's done downloading the update/large game.


jcremin

join:2009-12-22
Siren, WI
kudos:2

Most video services will buffer ahead, so even some light browsing typically won't be an issue. If a second person tries to also stream or do a big download, then yes, you'll probably have problems.

You will just have to weigh out whether you want no caps and better latency, or if your Hughes connection is more appropriate for what you need to do.


Name141

join:2006-09-02
reply to Name141

Well, seeing as it took 10 days to download Batman Arkham City (15 GBs) I think I'd be happier on the WISP if it's stable.


raytaylor

join:2009-07-28
kudos:1
reply to Name141

In terms of surfing,
A satelite connection of 512k is slower than a wisp connection at 512k.

This is because of the ping times. Large downloads may be similar in speed, but surfing websites will feel like dialup when you use the satelite compared to the WISP.

Even though the speed is the same, the slow ping causes huge delays when downloading lots of small files and images that are used to build up a web page.