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pnh102
Reptiles Are Cuddly And Pretty
Premium
join:2002-05-02
Mount Airy, MD

2 recommendations

reply to FFH5

Re: Google anti-SOPA/PIPA actions will disappear soon

All the laws in the world won't change a thing. The Internet has been a complete game-changer to the way the content industry does business. To a certain extent, the music industry has adapted, even though Apple now holds them by the balls, but the movie industry hasn't.

I still do not subscribe to the notion that each incidence of piracy is equal a lost sale. There is no proof whatsoever that people who pirate content would have otherwise purchased it legitimately if piracy were not an option.

I do hold to the fact that like the DMCA, all SOPA/PIPA will do is make life miserable for legitimate users of copyrighted content. The same content industry that gave us the DMCA still clings to the idea that you need to buy a separate copy of the same content if you want to use it in different places, and still believes that you are a criminal should you decide to break the DRM restrictions on legitimately purchased content so that you can use it in non-infringing ways (sorry RIAA, but ripping a track off a CD you bought so you can listen to it in the car without ruining the original disk is NOT piracy).

The push for yet another law just reminds of the push for more gun control laws. In both situations, none of the present laws are effective, the ones in place don't seem to be enforced, and the only people who are impacted are legitimate users who simply wish to exercise their rights.

Enough is enough.
--
"Net Neutrality" zealots - the people you can thank for your capped Internet service.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
said by pnh102:

All the laws in the world won't change a thing. The Internet has been a complete game-changer to the way the content industry does business. To a certain extent, the music industry has adapted, even though Apple now holds them by the balls, but the movie industry hasn't.

I still do not subscribe to the notion that each incidence of piracy is equal a lost sale. There is no proof whatsoever that people who pirate content would have otherwise purchased it legitimately if piracy were not an option.

I do hold to the fact that like the DMCA, all SOPA/PIPA will do is make life miserable for legitimate users of copyrighted content. The same content industry that gave us the DMCA still clings to the idea that you need to buy a separate copy of the same content if you want to use it in different places, and still believes that you are a criminal should you decide to break the DRM restrictions on legitimately purchased content so that you can use it in non-infringing ways (sorry RIAA, but ripping a track off a CD you bought so you can listen to it in the car without ruining the original disk is NOT piracy).

The push for yet another law just reminds of the push for more gun control laws. In both situations, none of the present laws are effective, the ones in place don't seem to be enforced, and the only people who are impacted are legitimate users who simply wish to exercise their rights.

Enough is enough.

I haven't defended all the copyright law features. No one has. Not even the RIAA or MPAA. But opponents like to take the position that if copyright law isn't perfect, then there should be no copyright at all. Many of those opponents do subscribe to the entitlement theory that "IF they can steal it; they should be allowed to". The solution isn't all or nothing. The copyright laws need changing, especially for length of time and use by 1 person over many devices. So lobby for those changes. But enforcing copyright restrictions IS NEEDED, especially from those overseas who feel that stealing from the RICH USA is justified.
--
The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, I'm from the government and I'm here to help.
»www.politico.com/2012-election/



N3OGH
Yo Soy Col. "Bat" Guano
Premium
join:2003-11-11
Philly burbs
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to pnh102
You & Coldmoon pretty much sum it up.

Use the tools you have now in an effective & responsible way, then we MIGHT consider giving you more.

Make it so that legitimate purchasers can use their content as they see fit.

Making the parallel to gun control is a good argument. The government doesn't enforce the laws that are on the books, but they want to make it harder for legitimate folks to exercise their rights...
--
Petty people are disproportionally corrupted by petty power


Jackie

@bmo.com
reply to FFH5
said by FFH5:

I haven't defended all the copyright law features. No one has. Not even the RIAA or MPAA. But opponents like to take the position that if copyright law isn't perfect, then there should be no copyright at all.

There really shouldn't be any copyright law at all. Or at least, nothing other than restrictions regarding commercial use. "Copyright" is an artificial entity creating value by restricting thought, nothing more. (Intellectual property is nothing more than data, information, and ultimately thought.) By trying to tell people what they can copy or not, view or not, and if they could manage it, think about or not, they're ultimately attempting to control how we think.
Companies need to realize this anachronistic business model of artificially limiting a free resource to increase value is never going to work in the digital age. They are fighting a losing battle. What they need to do is provide tangible value, something that doesn't need artificial legal restrictions to back up its demand. This is inevitable - they will adapt or die out. "Piracy" is growing, not shrinking. People are learning that information is as free as the bandwidth it takes to acquire it. The cat is out of the bag, and no amount of government wrangling is ever getting it back in.


Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA
reply to FFH5
If new laws are needed to combat overseas piracy, then make them targeted and with checks in place to prevent abuse. SOPA and PIPA are vague and have little to no checks. They might be intended to only combat an overseas pirate, but as they are written they could be used to take down legitimate sites based on a mere claim of infringement.

Even if you trust that the current government wouldn't allow these abuses (and, with a username like "ThrowDemsOut", I'm guessing you don't), can you guarantee that the next government won't? What about the one after that?

SOPA and PIPA are way too vague and way too ripe for abuse. We need to toss them out and start from scratch. (Or use the OPEN bill that was formed as an alternative to SOPA/PIPA.)
--
-Jason Levine