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bcltoys

join:2008-07-21
Lost today

Stop hd video or stop all video.

I have no problem with stopping all video downloading on cell-network's. You-tube 4 billon download's a day not all on mobile network's but proly half. Let the fire storm/flaming begin.

Thistool

@144.70.2.x

Re: Stop hd video or stop all video.

Bandwidth is not Finite Nor is spectrum, a companies lack of willingness to upgrade and improve infrastructure is this brick wall. If you follow a natural technology progression 20 years ago a 900baud modem was as fast as most thought we could go. Today I type this on a residential 100/50 fiber to the home connection. The same can and should be said about radio waves and the ability's to efficiently use them. While it seems uncommon now to do most everything over a cellular network for most bandwidth needs. Video's, games, content, media in general will continue to increase and technology will adapt to make more efficient use of market required needs. Until the market demands a substantial shift in the way business is done. Legacy companies will continue to cry foul and waste more money spinning arguments trying to convince the masses that increased cost and less service is needed for the good of the network. To be honest in a dream world most companies would love to charge you for not providing a service and continue to raise rates when they literally do nothing for you. Stockholders will never be satisfied with a 100% profit margin the market will continue to want increased profits quarter by quarter.

fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

Re: Stop hd video or stop all video.

said by Thistool :

Bandwidth is not Finite Nor is spectrum

Do you live in an alternate universe that doesn't have our laws of physics or something?

Spectrum is a finite quantity. Period.
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1

Re: Stop hd video or stop all video.

said by fifty nine:

said by Thistool :

Bandwidth is not Finite Nor is spectrum

Do you live in an alternate universe that doesn't have our laws of physics or something?

Spectrum is a finite quantity. Period.

Uh no, spectrum within a cell tower radius is finite. You can add as many cells as you want, and string up fiber to those cells as needed. In 5-10 years Verizon will be able to leverage FIOS to set up a hetnet.
jcremin

join:2009-12-22
Siren, WI
kudos:2

Re: Stop hd video or stop all video.

said by sonicmerlin:

Uh no, spectrum within a cell tower radius is finite. You can add as many cells as you want, and string up fiber to those cells as needed.

While that is true to an extent, most of the cell antennas are 200 to 400 feet above ground so one tower might overlap a dozen other towers over a 20 (or more) mile radius in terms of self-interference, even though the useful range to a cell phone might only be 5 miles.

So even though it seems like it would be an easy fix to just throw up a ton of towers, the reality is that it creates a nightmare of RF to deal with, and all of those towers are quite expensive.

I run into the same problems with my WISP. I have some areas with no service, and have had offers from landowners to build a tower to fill the gaps, but because all of my spectrum is already in use on surrounding towers, I can't put anything else up, even if I can afford the tower.

One option is to run fiber down a highway and put up a ton of small "towers" which are only 30 or 50 feet tall and sheltered by the surrounding trees or buildings, limiting the interaction with other towers. But then the problem becomes that every little hill, patch of trees, or cluster of buildings ends up creating dead zones all over the place. So while we end up with a high capacity system, the coverage ends up much more limited than fewer tall towers.
prairiesky

join:2008-12-08
canada
kudos:2

Re: Stop hd video or stop all video.

a perfect example of femto cell RF hell are appartment blocks. Take a look at how well Wifi works. 10's if not hundreds of AP's visible. Tons of interference. It simply doesn't work.
Sammer

join:2005-12-22
Canonsburg, PA
said by jcremin:

said by sonicmerlin:

Uh no, spectrum within a cell tower radius is finite. You can add as many cells as you want, and string up fiber to those cells as needed.

While that is true to an extent, most of the cell antennas are 200 to 400 feet above ground so one tower might overlap a dozen other towers over a 20 (or more) mile radius in terms of self-interference, even though the useful range to a cell phone might only be 5 miles. ends up much more limited than fewer tall towers.

Yes and the lower the frequency the greater the problem. There is significantly more self-interference at 700 MHZ than at 1.9 GHz and lower frequencies than 700 MHz are worse. The cell companies really need government agencies (the worst spectrum hoarders) to eventually give up underutilized spectrum between 1 and 2 GHz.
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1
said by jcremin:

said by sonicmerlin:

Uh no, spectrum within a cell tower radius is finite. You can add as many cells as you want, and string up fiber to those cells as needed.

While that is true to an extent, most of the cell antennas are 200 to 400 feet above ground so one tower might overlap a dozen other towers over a 20 (or more) mile radius in terms of self-interference, even though the useful range to a cell phone might only be 5 miles.

So even though it seems like it would be an easy fix to just throw up a ton of towers, the reality is that it creates a nightmare of RF to deal with, and all of those towers are quite expensive.

I run into the same problems with my WISP. I have some areas with no service, and have had offers from landowners to build a tower to fill the gaps, but because all of my spectrum is already in use on surrounding towers, I can't put anything else up, even if I can afford the tower.

One option is to run fiber down a highway and put up a ton of small "towers" which are only 30 or 50 feet tall and sheltered by the surrounding trees or buildings, limiting the interaction with other towers. But then the problem becomes that every little hill, patch of trees, or cluster of buildings ends up creating dead zones all over the place. So while we end up with a high capacity system, the coverage ends up much more limited than fewer tall towers.

We won't be using "towers" in 10 years when 5G rolls around (or DIDO, whichever comes first).

At any rate, LTE A does 1 gbps over 67 MHz. Verizon and AT&T have almost twice that much spectrum. I'm sure they'll find more to warehouse when the FCC auctions off another 300 MHz soon.