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adamtech78

join:2006-01-25
Chicago, IL

what's needed to air dry clothes in basement?

Hello.
Half of our basement is finished and it has one register and one return.
The second half of the basement which is utility has no hvac at all.
Do I need to run both air in and air out in order to air dry clothes?
The way things are now in winter the single register is not enough to warm up the basement and we have an electric oil space heater.

Thanks.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

They will certainly dry without installing an additional vent, they will just take longer to dry. One advantage you probably haven't thought about is that we doing this you will add additional humidity to your home which will help it feel warmer.



DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to adamtech78

Maybe a dehumidifier in addition to a recirculate mode

Dry air should be more able to absorb water from wet cloths



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
reply to adamtech78

What's wrong with your dryer? Is it electric or gas?
--
...because I care.



Smokey
I'd rather be skiing
Premium
join:2003-05-20
Wild West
reply to adamtech78

I would recommend you establish the current average humidity in the basement. Use a moving average over a few weeks, with rainy weather outside. If during that time your average humidity in the basement is over 40%, you should take some actions to mitigate the added humidity that drying your clothes will add. Because you have finished the basement, the best option will be to vent the added humidity to the rest of the home if you have low humidity overall. If you have high humidity, look at adding a dehumidifier that can come on when over a set humidity.
--
Para Bellum!!


scross

join:2002-09-13
Cordova, TN
reply to adamtech78

In addition to any humidity issues, air flow would probably be your next biggest issue. If you want things to dry fairly quickly (definitely before they start turning musty) then you'll need good circulation between and around the clothing. A good box fan may be all that you'll need, though.



The Pig
I know you want to be me
Premium
join:2009-09-11
reply to adamtech78

Juct move the space heater closer to the clothes!
I hate air dried clothes they are stiff!



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

adamtech78

As others said, get a humidity reading from your basement for a few weeks before hanging laundry in there.

In a lot of cases, people should have a dehumidifier in their basement running on automatic mode just to keep the humidity level in there at a reasonable level without even hanging laundry in there.

I'd recommend you find a way to hang laundry UPSTAIRS.

The basement won't smell damp.
The clothes will dry faster.
You won't need to have a dehumidifer and heater in the basement.
You'll keep the humidity upstairs at a comfortable level for the winter

I'm assuming you want to hang laundry in the basement for winter, or is it because you don't want your delicates to hang in public?
Because if it's for summer too, you can just dry your delicates on a small drying rack in your living room, but the big stuff like shirts, pants, bed sheets, can be outside.

said by nunya:

What's wrong with your dryer? Is it electric or gas?

I think he's just trying to lower the utility bill (Gas or electricity).

said by The Pig:

I hate air dried clothes they are stiff!

That's what liquid fabric softener is for. But ya I agree it's never the same softness, but are you a MAN or a man?!


nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
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reply to adamtech78

Running a dehumidifier, fan, and heater certainly will not help lower expenses; if that is what the OP is trying to do.
After all, a dryer is simply a fan and a heater with a convenient place to pile all your clothes while they dry.

If the OP would like to save some of the heat going out the dryer vent, they make diverter kits for that. However if you use the cheap kits, you will end up with a dusty house full of lint. Of course, these can only be used on electric dryers.
--
...because I care.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

We dry all of the baby clothes in the living room. Actually not all of them, mostly the towels and bibs.

The wood stove makes the air pretty dry so they dry in no time. Plus they are nice and warm.

No sense wasting perfectly good gas in the dryer when there's a roaring wood fire burning.


adamtech78

join:2006-01-25
Chicago, IL

Click for full size
current layout
Click for full size
proposed layout
Our current dryer is very old and probably has few months left (we moved in six months ago and the washer finally took a dump two months after).
My wife air dries most of her stuff so that it doesn't shrink etc
I air dry some shifts so I don't have to iron. LOL

Ceeling is very low already and running hvac ducts will be difficult. The way things are now is we have ceeling tiles in the utility area and there is no slack between the tiles, pipes, hvac runs, and joists.

The utility area does not have any hvac openings nor returns and wintertime now it gets pretty cold.

Based on the two drawings moving the laundry stuff closer to the hvac unit is doable but it also involves:
- extending the gas line
- tapping into hot and cold water
- cutting a hole in the outside wall to vent
- running new water line to get rid of water from the sink

I think it will be easier to get hvac ducts into the laundry area for air to circulate and putting in a door between the storage area and tool storage.

The house was originally a single story I think.
While it's warm on the main level it's cold upstairs, especially in the two bedrooms (the master bedroom has a little clear plastic almost flap like thing so that it's harder for air to return). I think I'll need to have a air pressure switched fan installed into the main duct going upstairs to bring more air up. And I think I'll run into issues getting enough air in and out of the laundry area.

I'd like to extend the gas line a bit to move the dryier to where the utility sink is now and mount the utility sink over the sump and having the rest of the space for storage and air dry.

The way the laundry area is setup now is very wasteful in space how the dryer, washer, sink, and sump are in relation to each other.

I'll scan the drawings I made and post in a moment.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

there's a roaring wood fire burning.

I kept reading that as "roaming wood fire". Damnit, why couldn't you have said that?


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

said by alkizmo:

said by fifty nine:

there's a roaring wood fire burning.

I kept reading that as "roaming wood fire". Damnit, why couldn't you have said that?

Sounds like an Idea for a WoW trash mob


iknow

@optonline.net
reply to adamtech78

check out "high pressure AC" for the AC, and "direct vented gas heater" for heat.


adamtech78

join:2006-01-25
Chicago, IL


as of 10pm
61*F
37% humidity

with the door to the utility / laundry area closed most of the day.



HRM
God Bless America
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-03
Darien, CT
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to adamtech78

I have found that all one needs to dry clothes inside is a fan. During college I used a small clip on. All of my T-shirts are 100% cotton and a drier shrinks them unless I am perfect with the timing turning off and removing them. Putting a fan near wet clothes and blowing air on them worked very fast for me.

At your humidity level you will improve the breath-ability of the air in my book. I find that a bit on the low side for comfort while sleeping (so I don't get a dry throat.)

If you had even one vent between the areas, it might expedite the air exchange, but I feel moisture is so low it will find its way into the house on its own. The crack under most doors is often bigger than one thinks in places like basements, but you would know better.


Neil Rice

join:2011-10-03

I think you've gotten some good advice here so far. Of course there's more than one way to approach the problem, I would second the advice for getting a dehumidifier. But doing a humidity study of your basement and house is a great idea. I would also suggest talking to a dealer tech and getting recommendations for what size you need for the size of your basement. I've been using a dehumidifier in ours for years. It just conked out last month, so now I'm looking at a Aprilaire. I would also recommend getting as much of a dehumidifier as you can afford. They can be expensive, but if you do have high humidity it's worth it, especially if it can help you avoid mold problems.

Neil


Neil Rice

join:2011-10-03
reply to HRM

I think you've gotten some good advice here so far. Of course there's more than one way to approach the problem, I would second the advice for getting a dehumidifier. But doing a humidity study of your basement and house is a great idea. I would also suggest talking to a dealer tech and getting recommendations for what size you need for the size of your basement. I've been using a dehumidifier in ours for years. It just conked out last month, so now I'm looking at a Aprilaire. I would also recommend getting as much of a dehumidifier as you can afford. They can be expensive, but if you do have high humidity it's worth it, especially if it can help you avoid mold problems.

Neil


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to adamtech78

Humidity levels in the basement are the result of two factors: the rate that water enters the air in the space v. the rate at which the air is exchanged out of the basement with drier air.

It could be that both levels are low and a small dehumidifier would be plenty, or it could be that all that's needed is more air exchange with the upstairs (drier air). That may be accomplished by just running the furnace fan manually for a while.

I'd try running the furnace fan while drying clothes and see how that works before spending more money on a dehumidifier. Keep the doors to the area where you're hanging the wash open and maybe put a small fan in, set to blow air in or out of that area to make it exchange air with a space where the furnace air vents. Keep an eye on the humidity while doing so -- I suspect it will work out fine.


Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to adamtech78

We used to dry cloths in our old house down in the basement. became completely ineffective when a new boiler got installed as the cloths line was in the boiler area of the cellar.

I guess though that pretty much showed how much heat the old boiler was not putting into the heating system though.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports



Dryinncryin

@74.198.150.x
reply to adamtech78

For air drying your clothes I highly recommend a room that has a steady supply of air in it.

AVOID liquid filled options at all costs you will not get the desired result. HoPe this helps. If all else fails call a pro.


Neil Rice

join:2011-10-03
reply to Kearnstd

Well, a lot of options here, some good ones. I think it's cool you can tap the power of the Internet to find this kind of info now. It still amazes me. I would second the opinions that you should try some other options before you invest in a dehumidifier. I however, have to get another. Maybe we should just move to Arizona.



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
reply to adamtech78

A fan is probably plenty, actually.



smithfly114
Premium
join:2008-01-14
reply to Dryinncryin

said by Dryinncryin :

For air drying your clothes I highly recommend a room that has a steady supply of air in it.

AVOID liquid filled options at all costs you will not get the desired result. HoPe this helps. If all else fails call a pro.

I agree, a liquid filled room would not dry your clothes.

ha


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9
reply to adamtech78

We have a gas dryer but don't like shrunken clothes. During the winter we hang them in the same room with our (innefficient) furnace. They dry relatively quickly with nothing more. There is no air-flow. As for the humidity, we don't have to run the dehumidifier in the winter - it stays nice and dry there. In the summer, likely because of our climate, we have to run the dehumidifier to keep the basement from getting damp. But then the clothes are hung outside. I suggest trying it by hanging them in the furnace room (just keep them well away from the furnace and any sources of ignition). See what happens. It won't cost you anything.


Neil Rice

join:2011-10-03
reply to Neil Rice

Really, after thinking about this, especially since I talked to a friend doing the same thing, I think it's better to just get a washer and dryer and be done with it. Unless you have moisture problems you have to take care of too. The smell and feel of clothes just aren't the same. Have to dry them outside for that.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to whizkid3

said by whizkid3:

See what happens. It won't cost you anything.

Thanks to you, my shirts now smell like spiders!

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
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reply to adamtech78

If you had an electric dryer you might want to do what a friend of mine did. He installed a special dryer vent valve and supplemental filter in the dryer vent line. In the winter he switched the valve so it directed the hot moist air into the return air plenum of the heating system, from the dryer. In the summer the valve directed the hot moist air to the vent line outside. For best results he turned the heating system fan on while drying clothes. That added humidity and heat to the air in the home not wasting any energy and humidifying the home.

The problem is that you have a gas dryer. Combustion products from a gas dryer are vented through the dryer vent. Venting a gas dryer into the heating system can cause Carbon Monoxide poisoning.


patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to adamtech78

said by adamtech78:

Our current dryer is very old and probably has few months left (we moved in six months ago and the washer finally took a dump two months after).

My washer and gas drier were bought in 1971. Puke yellow green in color. Drier has a metal support bar fall out and scrape against the drum once. Washer had a belt break, and a hose of some kind attached to the drum developed a crack and a leak where a hose clamp attached it to the drum. Otherwise no problems. I plan to use them until the day I die.

My washer looks almost identical to this pic, except I have 2 more white buttons on the right side »kayevs.files.wordpress.com/2008/···48&h=339

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

said by patcat88:

said by adamtech78:

Our current dryer is very old and probably has few months left (we moved in six months ago and the washer finally took a dump two months after).

My washer and gas drier were bought in 1971. Puke yellow green in color. Drier has a metal support bar fall out and scrape against the drum once. Washer had a belt break, and a hose of some kind attached to the drum developed a crack and a leak where a hose clamp attached it to the drum. Otherwise no problems. I plan to use them until the day I die.

My washer looks almost identical to this pic, except I have 2 more white buttons on the right side »kayevs.files.wordpress.com/2008/···48&h=339

my mom has the same maytag, my aunt has the same one, survived being submerged twice in basement flooding. When my 5 year old 'ge' (made by mabe) died i went looking for one like that, they retail for over 150$ for a 30 year old washer!