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NickD
Premium
join:2000-11-17
Princeton Junction, NJ
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to andyross

Re: Netflix doesn't want DVD's and doesn't care

This might be an opportunity for a rogue website in another country to make a profit. Start a subscription service similar to Netflix, stream any movie and ignore the C&D's. People will think it's legal because they're paying for it. If they're in the right place (such as a third world country) they won't get shut down unless the US declares war on that country. Plus they can advertise their service as being available worldwide, which Netflix can't do. How does the Pirate Bay stay up so long despite being the target of every copyright enforcement agency in the world?

Hollywood would lose a lot of the Netflix money and would have to change their terms to allow Netflix to compete with the illegal site. Right now, every movie in the entire Netflix catalog is able to be pirated for free. But people pay for Netflix for the ease of access and integration with multiple devices, as well as the fact that it's legal and affordable. If a new website pops up that has the exact same service as Netflix, except that it has many more movies available for streaming and it's illegal (but the site claims it's legal), people will switch to it.

slckusr
Premium
join:2003-03-17
Greenville, SC
kudos:1
I thought some guy tried to do this with network connected dvd players and failed. failed as in government\business said nono


vpoko
Premium
join:2003-07-03
Boston, MA
reply to NickD
Good luck streaming video from another country. International bandwidth ain't that great.


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
reply to NickD
said by NickD:

This might be an opportunity for a rogue website in another country to make a profit. Start a subscription service similar to Netflix, stream any movie and ignore the C&D's. People will think it's legal because they're paying for it. If they're in the right place (such as a third world country) they won't get shut down unless the US declares war on that country. Plus they can advertise their service as being available worldwide, which Netflix can't do. How does the Pirate Bay stay up so long despite being the target of every copyright enforcement agency in the world?

Hollywood would lose a lot of the Netflix money and would have to change their terms to allow Netflix to compete with the illegal site. Right now, every movie in the entire Netflix catalog is able to be pirated for free. But people pay for Netflix for the ease of access and integration with multiple devices, as well as the fact that it's legal and affordable. If a new website pops up that has the exact same service as Netflix, except that it has many more movies available for streaming and it's illegal (but the site claims it's legal), people will switch to it.

I guess you haven't heard: You can now be arrested and extradited to the US to stand trial for breaking US copyright laws, even if you and your "Service" have never stepped foot on US soil. All thanks to the post-9/11 anti-terrorism laws.

»www.theregister.co.uk/2012/01/13···_piracy/
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Mr Fel
Premium
join:2008-03-17
Louisville, KY
reply to slckusr
That's because the company was within the country. He's talking about a company outside of the country.
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fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
said by Mr Fel:

That's because the company was within the country. He's talking about a company outside of the country.

I have one word for you - megaupload.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to vpoko
said by vpoko:

Good luck streaming video from another country. International bandwidth ain't that great.

Not only that, but local laws in a lot of other countries are stricter. And it would have to be a foreign TLD too since .com could be seized by the FBI.


Mr Fel
Premium
join:2008-03-17
Louisville, KY
reply to fifty nine
They had servers in Virginia, that's how that whole mess started.