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Savillian

join:2003-11-22

1 edit

[Aliant] Bell FibreOP coming to Greater Sudbury!

FTTH coming to the Greater Sudbury area bringing the BEST TV, Internet and Phone over a fibre optic cable directly in your home!

More details to be coming, if you are interested go to www.fibreop.ca


habskilla

join:2005-09-19
Moncton, NB

Enjoy!

I hope it's the same service we're enjoying in Atlantic Canada. No caps and no throttling. But I hope your TV experience is better.
--
[IMG]»i1238.photobucket.com/albums/ff5···ng[/IMG]


Savillian

join:2003-11-22

said by habskilla:

Enjoy!

I hope it's the same service we're enjoying in Atlantic Canada. No caps and no throttling. But I hope your TV experience is better.

Oh I plan on enjoying it! Apparently it will be the same service, speeds and pricing still TBD. What about the TV do you not like?


mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to Savillian

It does appear to be Bell Aliant. Press release was issued. »www.newswire.ca/en/story/916559/···-ontario


Savillian

join:2003-11-22

said by mlerner:

It does appear to be Bell Aliant. Press release was issued. »www.newswire.ca/en/story/916559/···-ontario

Oh I know its Bell Aliant, my paycheck says so. Although we are Bell Aliant, marketing is done under the "Bell" only brand and this service will be the same.


habskilla

join:2005-09-19
Moncton, NB
reply to Savillian

The issues below are related to the having the old IPTV system delivered via VDSL2. It seems that Aliant can't take full advantage of the fibre connection because they only have one backend TV system that servers legacy and FibreOp. If you don't have legacy IPTV then maybe you're not going to have these issues.

Issues:
HD picture is soft and can be pixelated.
Not broadcasting in true 5.1. They're sending this simulated 5.1 which is crap.
Slow channel changing.
Basic PVR features missing.



habskilla

join:2005-09-19
Moncton, NB

1 edit

This is the first rollout of FibreOp outside of Atlantic Canada.
--




BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
reply to Savillian

Looks like the density argument just fell flat on its face



Chuck sTruck

@teksavvy.com
reply to Savillian

Bell will buy 51 percent of the Bell Aliant shares (they own 40 percent now) and promptly shut down all operations in Sudbury forever.



mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to BliZZardX

said by BliZZardX:

Looks like the density argument just fell flat on its face

Partially but there are other factors at play. There are areas of Sudbury that are built up density wise and may be cost effective to run fibre. My Grandparents live in Chelmsford in the Greater Sudbury area which is now mostly a residential community, where they live there are actually a lot of housing around them. Additionally, Eastlink has a large presence all around Sudbury, I suspect that Bell Aliant is actually keen on competing instead of following the leader such as what they're doing in New Brunswick and other areas.

Also from reading Aliant's shareholder reports I can see that they're more interested in capital investment than Bell Canada as a whole is.


mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to Chuck sTruck

said by Chuck sTruck :

Bell will buy 51 percent of the Bell Aliant shares (they own 40 percent now) and promptly shut down all operations in Sudbury forever.

Not going to happen. As a matter of fact, Bell Canada gave some of their service areas in Ontario to Bell Aliant recently, I think last year.


nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON
reply to BliZZardX

said by BliZZardX:

Looks like the density argument just fell flat on its face

To quote from the local news... "The large amount of aerial infrastructure allows us to quickly deploy the service"...

Its not a density argument...its a "easy to put up on poles" argument, thank you very much, hope you people enjoy your big green and blue and black boxes on your properties....with super slow internet.

GO GO Internet!! I don't care honestly about TV...want blazing fast internet and soon!!

DigiNinja
Premium
join:2012-02-06
canada
reply to Savillian

Of note, FTTH is not new in Sudbury. A local company is already providing the service in select areas with TV/Internet/VoIP bundling.

Further information can be found at »www.vianet.tv



BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile

2 edits
reply to nitzguy

The #1 reason Canadians have always been given as to why our internet sucks is that we are sparsely populated.

Meanwhile in Sweden you can get 100/100Mbit from Bredband2 in a town of 4000 people, through the local stadsnat, for as little as $12/month. And gigabit to rural businesses 20 minutes outside the town.

There are many neighbourhoods in Toronto, superbly wealthy ones I might add, with above ground infrastructure as well, for example Lawrence Park, Forest Hill, Rosedale. Some people here spend $60,000 on property taxes. Do you see FTTH here? No.

This just kills the density argument.


Savillian

join:2003-11-22
reply to mlerner

said by mlerner:

said by Chuck sTruck :

Bell will buy 51 percent of the Bell Aliant shares (they own 40 percent now) and promptly shut down all operations in Sudbury forever.

Not going to happen. As a matter of fact, Bell Canada gave some of their service areas in Ontario to Bell Aliant recently, I think last year.

Bell already has managerial control over Bell Aliant, even with owning 40 some percent. Trust me, the execs on the Bell side know about this investment.

said by nitzguy:

said by BliZZardX:

Looks like the density argument just fell flat on its face

To quote from the local news... "The large amount of aerial infrastructure allows us to quickly deploy the service"...

Its not a density argument...its a "easy to put up on poles" argument, thank you very much, hope you people enjoy your big green and blue and black boxes on your properties....with super slow internet.

GO GO Internet!! I don't care honestly about TV...want blazing fast internet and soon!!

Yep nitzguy is very right on this, aerial makes it much easier and far less costly to roll out

Learning more and more about this service everyday, this is going to be a game changer in this area.


nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON
reply to BliZZardX

said by BliZZardX:

The #1 reason Canadians have always been given as to why our internet sucks is that we are sparsely populated.

Meanwhile in Sweden you can get 100/100Mbit from Bredband2 in a town of 4000 people, through the local stadsnat, for as little as $12/month. And gigabit to rural businesses 20 minutes outside the town.

There are many neighbourhoods in Toronto, superbly wealthy ones I might add, with above ground infrastructure as well, for example Lawrence Park, Forest Hill, Rosedale. Some people here spend $60,000 on property taxes. Do you see FTTH here? No.

This just kills the density argument.

In reality, we are sparsely populated. I don't know what swedish stuff you're talking about with Bredband2 and stadsnat, and I just don't feel like looking it up, but here's the reality of the situation.

...Underground infrastructure. 50 years ago things were different. People weren't as crazy about roads being torn up and whatnot as they are now. The man power and the expense of pulling permits, getting locates, making sure everything is safe is very expensive in an underground infrastructure.

Since Fibreoptics are not "inherently dangerous" they can just be thrown up on utility poles next to the cable lines and the phone lines as they sit right now. Throw up wire, staple, tack it on, place the associated support equipment at the appropriate support intervals and you're good to go. You can wire up a city in a matter of months.

Underground means that it has to run where the current equipment is...who's lawn gets that shiny little box which they don't want and will fight tooth and nail as they'll be afraid their property values will be diminished as a result. The digging, trenching, because as it sits right now, cable is supposed to be at the top roughly 6-18" below ground in an underground infrastructure....where does this Fibreop line go? There's not much room left to manuvere...do they pull out the phone lines as they go? What if people don't want to upgrade? And the associated backlashes of that as a result.

Imagine in a big apartment building in Toronto. Ok, so Bell takes all the work of pulling equipment into the basement of the apartment building....now what.

Are you going to use phone lines to travel up to the 22nd floor? Are you going to use cable lines?

The reality is you can't pull Fibre up to each individual apartment. Could you run ethernet? Who's going to bear the cost of that?

Anyways, we'll see if this actually flushes out but I'm excited. Unfortunately Vianet which would seem to have a head start on the competition is major league dropping the ball as you can't get a price from their website and you can't get a location as to definitively where they are available, so for me, they're out...

Savillian

join:2003-11-22

said by nitzguy:

...Anyways, we'll see if this actually flushes out but I'm excited...

Glad someone else is!


creed3020
Premium
join:2006-04-26
Kitchener, ON
kudos:2
reply to Savillian

This is great news for Sudbury but I thought there already was extensive FTTH through other providers in this market? Is Bell just trying to compete and get some of the business? Weird that they would do this in an already established market.


Savillian

join:2003-11-22

said by creed3020:

This is great news for Sudbury but I thought there already was extensive FTTH through other providers in this market? Is Bell just trying to compete and get some of the business? Weird that they would do this in an already established market.

Vianet is the only one I know of and I couldnt even tell you the footprint but it cant be all that big as I never see their equipment or fibre on the poles I am up.

Vianet and Agilis(Sudbury Hydro) have a more extensive business fibre network but not for home.

Riplin

join:2002-05-13
canada
reply to Savillian

Bell is perfectly happy leaving copper to the home for as long as they could cause the insane profit margins are too much to resist. Houses a mere 50feet from fibre (sudbury is truly wired on main routes already) could not get hooked up cause they had no incentive to offer it. The copper rakes in too much profit. Eastlink changed the game moving to doc 3 offering far superior speeds and better bundles.

Don't get me wrong each has their own evils but 20mbps with no cap will eat any of bells dsl pkg's anyday. They had to do something and had to act quick. If they truly roll fibre to almost every house in sudbury (reasonably priced with NO CAP "you here me aliant? NO CAPS") then it will be a game changer.

There are alot of sheeple here though still and no matter how much you explain the technology it still comes down to how much $ it is /month.



nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON

said by Riplin:

Bell is perfectly happy leaving copper to the home for as long as they could cause the insane profit margins are too much to resist. Houses a mere 50feet from fibre (sudbury is truly wired on main routes already) could not get hooked up cause they had no incentive to offer it. The copper rakes in too much profit. Eastlink changed the game moving to doc 3 offering far superior speeds and better bundles.

Don't get me wrong each has their own evils but 20mbps with no cap will eat any of bells dsl pkg's anyday. They had to do something and had to act quick. If they truly roll fibre to almost every house in sudbury (reasonably priced with NO CAP "you here me aliant? NO CAPS") then it will be a game changer.

There are alot of sheeple here though still and no matter how much you explain the technology it still comes down to how much $ it is /month.

From what I hear, Bell Aliant (in the atlantic provinces) is a no cap service with the FibreOP service.

So...definitely I think it'll change the game here. At least for areas that can get it, but it looks like they're going to roll out a lot in a lot of areas based on the website...Although I think its funny they left the CO's of Rockwood and Lasalle on the list...even though 99% of people don't know what CO they're connected to...I believe there's 3 in Sudbury, there's one Downtown but I forget the name of the street, but big building next to the police station.


BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile

3 edits
reply to nitzguy

There are hundreds of old neighbourhoods across the GTA that have aerial infrastructure and the best Bell tells us they can do here is VDSL2. Fiber is impossible because Toronto is not dense enough we are told.





BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
reply to Savillian

The problem isn't above ground or underground and it's not density.

It has been and always will be competition.

You have vianet doing small scale FTTH in Sudbury, Bell are just trying to put them out of business.

Toronto has NO ONE doing FTTH (besides micro scale in some new residential projects), so Bell doesn't care at all.


Savillian

join:2003-11-22
reply to nitzguy

said by nitzguy:

So...definitely I think it'll change the game here. At least for areas that can get it, but it looks like they're going to roll out a lot in a lot of areas based on the website...Although I think its funny they left the CO's of Rockwood and Lasalle on the list...even though 99% of people don't know what CO they're connected to...I believe there's 3 in Sudbury, there's one Downtown but I forget the name of the street, but big building next to the police station.

That will be changed very shortly, we pointed that out this morning that the employees are mainly the only people that would know what those areas correspond to. Should have been something along the lines of South End, Downtown and New Sudbury.

AndrewW

join:2009-03-07
Toronto, ON
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to BliZZardX

said by BliZZardX:

The problem isn't above ground or underground and it's not density.

It has been and always will be competition.

You have vianet doing small scale FTTH in Sudbury, Bell are just trying to put them out of business.

Toronto has NO ONE doing FTTH (besides micro scale in some new residential projects), so Bell doesn't care at all.

Nor is the problem a lack of money. Allow me to illustrate.

I live in the High Park area of Toronto and most of the Bell plant is aerial. Last summer I was pleasantly surprised to see a bunch of Expertech crews rewiring the neighbourhood. My initial thoughts were that we were finally going to get FTTH. They spent several weeks replacing most of the F2 lines and many of the drops not with new fibre but with shiny new copper. Then they came back a few weeks later to recondition all the pairs.

I still can't believe they would spend all that time and money replacing old copper with new copper. Furthermore, my Fibe 25 service hasn't improved any after all their work even though they claimed it would.

Apparently my neighbourhood was not unique. One of the guys from Expertech told me they were doing the same in over 70 locations in Toronto.


nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON
reply to BliZZardX

said by BliZZardX:

There are hundreds of old neighbourhoods across the GTA that have aerial infrastructure and the best Bell tells us they can do here is VDSL2. Fiber is impossible because Toronto is not dense enough we are told.

FYI, you keep pointing at hydro wires in your pics .

There are instances where hydro is aerial, but telco/cable is underground...heck there are some instances where hydro runs front yard and cable/telco run in the backyards...

Just saying .


BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON

1 edit

You said yourself that doesn't make a difference, fiber optic cables are not affected by EMI.

But if you really want to be picky about it:




DanS

@rogers.com

What is the cable in your pictures above? I see them run along a road i travel on each day and wonder what it is and who owns it.



BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile

1 edit

The first pic is a Rogers cable tap, node, and the Alpha box is a power supply/battery backup system.

The second is pic, minus the arrow furthest to the left, is all Bell plant, F2 cables and a spaghetti splice job. You can read more about how copper loops are generally designed here: »www.privateline.com/OSP/No.html



nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON

said by BliZZardX:

The first pic is a Rogers cable tap, node, and the Alpha box is a power supply/battery backup system.

The second is pic, minus the arrow furthest to the left, is all Bell plant, F2 cables and a spaghetti splice job. You can read more about how copper loops are generally designed here: »www.privateline.com/OSP/No.html

The 1st pic is not a node FYI. Nodes will sit on the ground and typically are not suspended in the air as they are quite heavy.

In the 1st pic what you are seeing is a Line extender, with obviously power to continue to transmit the signal along the wires.

I'm not familiar with Phone wiring technology so I have to trust what he said is correct.

In Cable terms the tap is what is actually to the left of the picture that's not in the box. Its where the cable runs from the outside plant usually down to the CSE or down into the subscribers home.

Hey, nothing is stopping you from pulling equipment and wires and setting up your own FTTH service..just get capital, go through the regulations, the CRTC, and poof...

Its going to be a 30 million dollar investment in Sudbury apparently according to the news and whatnot...so...30 million for potentially 50k + homes passed = $600/home... $600 x 2 million homes = 1,200,000,000 or... $1.2 Billion dollars....now you can see why they'd rather have spent the money buying part of the Maple Leafs . I would too. (counting roughly 2 million homes in the GTA total)...