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bluenote73

join:2009-02-17
V4N6A5

1 edit

[BC] Newb needs to understand Optik networking options

Hey guys

I'm getting Optik TV and internet installed this weekend. Unfortunately I haven't been able to find very much solid information so I can decide my preferable way of having it installed.
I've never had DSL, and I'm not familiar with the ins and outs of the requirements of the actiontec (?) the all in one modem/router they seem to force you to take or the PVR and client boxes.

I have a very complex setup (well, compared to your average home network, say) including vlan's and QOS and VOIP in my home already. With the Optik IPTV also taking up available bandwidth, I foresee the need to be able to configure my own QOS even moreso than I need it right now. I want to be able to use tomato for this. (A new addition that I've been planning since before I decided to switch to Optik from cable).

I guess we better start at the beginning. My house was not wired for ethernet, but the phones were run with 8 wire ethernet cable, so most outlets have 4 wires for telephone and 4 for ethernet. With many outlets not using even 1 pair of the 2 pair for telephone. Coax is available at all the TV's, and all have their own coax run except for one which is split off the main living room run which is where the PVR would be. I plan to have 2 client optik boxes acessing it. I don't anticipate the installer being able or inclined to run new cable considering that would include going from the 3rd top floor where the wiring is to 1st floor basement, and to the apartment above detached garage but that's just a guess on my part.

1) What are the connection options? Ethernet? telephone? coax? Does each box have all types of ports available, or are standalone transceivers used to convert? What kind of connectors are on the PVR/client boxes?

2) From perusing google images I dont see anything other than ethernet on the actiontec , is this correct?

If I eventually have to source a standalone ALU myself to be able to configure things the way I want and to be able to configure QOS that sees the whole QOS picture including available bandwidth, and to have incoming VPN etc then I don't want to have tripped over my own feet because of wiring decisions.

EDIT: Can I just buy any old VDSL2 modem and slap it in considering that whatever I did with an ALU would actually be unsupported anyways?

I'm sure some of these questions are dumb and show my ignorance so please educate me.

thanks

bimmerdriver

join:2010-12-10
Coquitlam, BC
The Telus "company line" is that Optik hardware comprises an Actiontec modem/router and however many PVR/STBs that you require for your TVs. Telus does not offer any stand-alone modems such as the ALU any more. Therefore, the configuration you currently have is "not supported" by Telus.

A few of us were lucky enough to get an ALU before Telus stopped supplying them. If you can get a VDSL2 modem from somewhere, it is possible to get Optik working without an Actiontec. You will be on your own as far as setting it up and Telus will probably not provide you much if any support.

I tried a BiPAC 8200M VDSL2 modem from Billion and it seemed to work okay. I believe there are some other companies that also make compatible VDSL2 modems.

Good luck and keep us posted.


Patman023
Ex-TELUS employee, Ubuntu Lover

join:2009-03-01
Edmonton, AB
reply to bluenote73
check your PMs.

DanteX

join:2010-09-09
kudos:1
reply to bimmerdriver
And this is why when it comes to hardware telus is a joke . People like the OP who have set ups such as his lets call them Power users. Power users are there for SOL so what options are there for such people? Is an ISP not capable of seeing to it all their customers needs are met?


ynohtna
Need... Speed

join:2005-02-02
Burnaby, BC
reply to bluenote73
If I were you, instead of trying to make sure everything work under one QOS, I'd just make sure it works with as little change as possible.

Now if your complex network is for internal stuff only then I'd just do something quick like I did here »Re: running 2 routers without nat issues.

If you require external access it will be a bit trickier, but the most important thing is that the internal part keeps going probably, correct?

So the Actiontec only worries about QOS TV and whatever port you connect your router to and you would QOS your internal network... if that makes any sense lol
--
Telus ADSL User Since 1999

bluenote73

join:2009-02-17
V4N6A5
said by ynohtna:

If I were you, instead of trying to make sure everything work under one QOS, I'd just make sure it works with as little change as possible.

Now if your complex network is for internal stuff only then I'd just do something quick like I did here »Re: running 2 routers without nat issues.

If you require external access it will be a bit trickier, but the most important thing is that the internal part keeps going probably, correct?

So the Actiontec only worries about QOS TV and whatever port you connect your router to and you would QOS your internal network... if that makes any sense lol

Thats what I will do (approximately) to begin with most likely. But to really properly QOS you need to have knowledge about the maximum size of the pipe, and with the setup you describe, its impossible to know the maximum size of the pipe because the IPTV will restrict it to a varying degree that will change at any given time.

Anybody can tell me about wiring and the types of plugs/tech/transceivers that are used?

Thanks to everyone who's chipped in so far.


ynohtna
Need... Speed

join:2005-02-02
Burnaby, BC
said by bluenote73:But to really properly QOS you need to have knowledge about the maximum size of the pipe, [/BQUOTE :

Pick a safe lower number and up it over time?

FYI, I have had 1HD stream going and still get close to my 25mb down at the same time. It's not a fact though, every set up will have different conditions and what not.
--
Telus ADSL User Since 1999


bluenote73

join:2009-02-17
V4N6A5
reply to bluenote73
Ok well I found a diagram of the back of the PVR in the manual for it, and it shows only an ethernet port. So I can only assume that in practice the way these installs are done, is to use a separate powered transceiver box , that takes a coax input and outputs ethernet, and one of these boxes is hooked up in tandem with each pvr or digital box.

Is this correct? Is this the common way? What kind of box/transceiver does this conversion? What are the other common ways of hooking this up?

Lots of people here with Optik right? Chime in, how are you wired?

thanks

meraki

join:2008-04-10
V3M 0C6
All the devices (Actiontec, Cisco CIS430 PVR and set top boxes) have HPNA Ethernet-over-coax built in. No additional transceivers required.

Generally the Actiontec modem will be placed nearby the PVR, the two connected via Ethernet. Coax runs from the Actiontec to your wall. Coax runs from your wall to the two other digital boxes.

The installer may hook up some of your unused phone wire pairs for Ethernet if you ask and deliver the TV to the two set top boxes (They did at my place.) but running it over coax to the two satellite boxes is probably cleaner.

bluenote73

join:2009-02-17
V4N6A5
said by meraki:

All the devices (Actiontec, Cisco CIS430 PVR and set top boxes) have HPNA Ethernet-over-coax built in. No additional transceivers required.

Generally the Actiontec modem will be placed nearby the PVR, the two connected via Ethernet. Coax runs from the Actiontec to your wall. Coax runs from your wall to the two other digital boxes.

The installer may hook up some of your unused phone wire pairs for Ethernet if you ask and deliver the TV to the two set top boxes (They did at my place.) but running it over coax to the two satellite boxes is probably cleaner.

Ahh thanks meraki, that helps a lot. I didn't see what I identified to be a coax connector on the diagram I was looking at but maybe I missed it or it wasnt the correct diagram. Either way your explanation clears up a lot of confusion for me, thanks.


Still Ub6

@telus.net
reply to meraki
So if I am understanding this right.. my pvr should be hooked up with an ethernet cable... not the old coax that was left there from Bell?

meraki

join:2008-04-10
V3M 0C6
reply to bluenote73
The PVR can be hooked up with either coax or Ethernet, though Ethernet is preferable. If it isn't much difficulty/change to do it over Ethernet they will.

meraki

join:2008-04-10
V3M 0C6
reply to bluenote73
Click for full size
Here's the back of a CIS430.

If you're running Ethernet, it'll plug into 1. If you're running HPNA over coax, it'll plug into 10.

AJ102

join:2005-03-22
Vancouver, BC
Reviews:
·TELUS
reply to bluenote73
Maybe this thread is the best place to ask a couple of questions about the connection options with Optik.

I have a 27-year old house wired with just standard telephone and TV cable, no access into the walls or floors to string ethernet. Right now I have Shaw cable internet coming into the computer room and hooked up to the cable internet modem. This line has been isolated from the other cable in the house. I have a Shaw Direct satellite antenna hooked up to the house cable in the attic and feeding through to the receiver in the family room. I got rid of the Telus phone a couple of years ago and use VoIP, with the ATA connected to my house telephone wiring, which is disconnected from Telus at the external junction box.

I assume from what I have read that for Telus Optik service they would reconnect my external Telus line, put the internet modem in the computer room (as I used to have before Shaw), and the TV receiver/PVR in the family room. Which one would the phone line connect to, the internet modem or the TV receiver (or both)? Would one be connected to the other via house cable instead of or in addition to having a phone line connection? If the house phone wiring is hooked up to Telus again for DSL without phone service, could I still use it to distribute my VoIP phone service within the house? (i.e., can it be safely isolated from Telus without interfering with the DSL signal?)

CR123

join:2006-11-04
Vancouver, BC
The phone line would be connected to the modem.

There has to be Cat 5 or RG6 coax from the modem to each TV. TELUS should install this during an install if not already in place.

Most phone wire has at least 2 pairs, so you can use one pair to bring the VDSL from the demarc (external junction box) to the computer room, and another pair to backfeed the VoIP to the demarc, distributing it through the house.
--
- The content of this post is my opinion, and does not reflect the opinions of my employer. -


JammerMan79
Premium,VIP
join:2004-05-13
Prince George, BC
kudos:10
reply to bluenote73
said by bluenote73:

Lots of people here with Optik right? Chime in, how are you wired?

thanks

I have drop ceiling in my house (1970's)
rewired everything with new cat 6 so I have ethernet in all rooms
--
I may work for, but do not necessarily represent the views and beliefs of TELUS Communications.


Still Ub6

@telus.net
reply to meraki
Meraki wrote

"The PVR can be hooked up with either coax or Ethernet, though Ethernet is preferable. If it isn't much difficulty/change to do it over Ethernet they will."


If it does not interfere with them going home at a decent time they will, ok thanks that explains why I still have the old cable for my Optic pvr.

AJ102

join:2005-03-22
Vancouver, BC
Reviews:
·TELUS
reply to CR123
said by CR123:

Most phone wire has at least 2 pairs, so you can use one pair to bring the VDSL from the demarc (external junction box) to the computer room, and another pair to backfeed the VoIP to the demarc, distributing it through the house.

Good idea, I'd forgotten about that.

I guess the old TV cable I have in the walls will have to do to hook up the TV to the Telus modem. The satellite service really wants RG6 coax too, but I made do with the grade I have rather than cutting holes in the walls. I hope Telus can do the same.