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sine

@rogers.com
reply to tdot_rc

Re: [Extreme] Using Moto SB5100 with Rogers Extreme

just want to make it clear, all these dudes that appear to know what they're talking about saying that a "CSR" has to provision your modem is false. modem provisioning on cable internet is an automatic thing, and powercycling your modem (aka turning off and on again :P) is how you get it re-provisioned.

I was looking at this topic because it was suggested to me from a rogers rep when I was cancelling for teksavvy that on the 12/.5 connection I have if I got the doc 3.0 modem my speeds would be faster, but I'm getting up to 30Mb/s anyway on my SB5100.


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·WIND Mobile
Actually sine, provisioning is a multi-stage process.

The first is step is getting the modem in Rogers registered modems list (if your modem came from other than Rogers)

The second step is Rogers putting your modem in the authorized DHCP lists for the servers and associating it with an account profile

The third step that is NORMALLY automated, is to push the account profile which will essentially do a reset.

The CSRs can do a reset and reassociate your modem with an account profile ... sometimes the required profile entry in the database gets messed up so the wrong profile gets pushed. They can reassociate a profile then push that it in case the modem isn't working as expected. This is what people generally mean when the CSR reprovisions your modem.

If you are on a cable segment with few modems, and your speed has been set faster, you can indeed get up to 38 Mbps with a DOCSIS 2 modem like the SB5100. But the segments with more modems (which is most of them) will suffer speed sag, and under those conditions, you would be way better off with DOCSIS 3. Moreover, the other people on your segment would be happier if you had DOCSIS 3 too particularly if you download at full speed at peak hours!

Fuzzy Dunlop

join:2011-02-07
Toronto, ON
sbrook is right (he always is lol).

However the exact process of provisioning a modem is neither here nor there, since Rogers are the ultimate gate-keepers. Regardless of whether or not modems like the SB6120 will work on Rogers' network, we'll never know, since no CSR I've ever spoken to will authorize one. You don't have to look hard online to find sob stories from customers who've shelled out $150 for a third-party DOCSIS 3 modem, only to be told they can't use it.


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
And the really sad part about Rogers not enabling other DOCSIS modems is that they can and do provision them for 3rd party providers like TSI, Distributel etc!

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
said by sbrook:

And the really sad part about Rogers not enabling other DOCSIS modems is that they can and do provision them for 3rd party providers like TSI, Distributel etc!

If you put yourself in Rogers' shoes, you might not want the cost overhead, complexity and potential confusion of supporting a dozen extra combinations of manufacturers and models either. Although TPIAs will usually accept any modem on the cableco's approved list unless the cable rejects it for some reason (lost, stolen, non-returned, known-bad, etc.), most TPIA ISPs themselves only recommend, sell and lease 1-2 models themselves as well.

Fuzzy Dunlop

join:2011-02-07
Toronto, ON
said by InvalidError:

If you put yourself in Rogers' shoes, you might not want the cost overhead, complexity and potential confusion of supporting a dozen extra combinations of manufacturers and models either. Although TPIAs will usually accept any modem on the cableco's approved list unless the cable rejects it for some reason (lost, stolen, non-returned, known-bad, etc.), most TPIA ISPs themselves only recommend, sell and lease 1-2 models themselves as well.

I remember the "it's too complicated" excuse from the early days of Rogers cable Internet service, back when CSR's would refuse to provide any support if you were using a router (I'm not kidding). I don't have an IT degree but even I find it hard to believe that two major brand DOCSIS 3 modems could be so different technically to justify barring one from your network. As sbrook said, Rogers CSRs won't provision third party modems for Rogers customers yet they will do just that if one of their wholesale customers asks for it. To me that says more about Rogers attitude toward customer relations than it does about anything technical. Rogers would rather have you pay them $200 and buy their approved hardware than run the risk of having to actually exert itself in fielding the occasional above average service request. This is the limit beyond which the company ceases to listen to its customers. Only when those customers are multi-million-dollar wholesale accounts will Rogers flex its customer relations muscle.
said by hurleyp:

It looks like I'm in the same boat. I bought a SB5100 in 2004. Somewhere along the way, Rogers grandfathered me to a 10 Mbps profile and started charging me for the 24 Mbps Extreme package. It looks like I'll have to start exploring my options.

Don't wait until the next billing cycle to take action. I downgraded to Express and honestly I can't tell the difference. If you can live with the lower bandwidth cap until you get a new ISP, go for it.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
said by Fuzzy Dunlop:

As sbrook said, Rogers CSRs won't provision third party modems for Rogers customers yet they will do just that if one of their wholesale customers asks for it.

Same goes for Videotron, Shaw and most other cablecos, they only support devices they sell/rent, anyone using anything else is on their own. Cablecos have fewer reserves about supporting other modems for TPIA because they do not need to deal with level-1 tech support for them and the TPIA ISP is the one eating the cost of modem replacements and truck rolls when the cableco determines that the modem was the cause of problems.