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damasterjj

join:2012-02-22
Fort Wayne, IN

frontier dsl vs fios ping times

which is more consistent? I remember when I have dsl with verizon ping times are always consistently low unless somebody in the house is using the internet.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

It can vary so there is no reliable answer. In theory FiOS should be faster but it's not guaranteed.

Regardless of the type of connection, your ping times should be pretty close to the same as long as your connection is not saturated. It's like asking how quickly you can get off a highway. If there's little or no cars (other packets) ahead of you, it's basically immediate. However if there is a line up of cars waiting to get off ahead of you (saturated connection), then it will take a while (latency) to get through.

Your DSL connection, being slower than a FiOS connection, can become congested easier with the same types of use.


damasterjj

join:2012-02-22
Fort Wayne, IN
reply to damasterjj

yeah, but from what I read DSL is pretty much a dedicated line while fios is shared internet connection.

when I had dsl my ping is always the same regardless of the time of the day. unless somebody is using internet in my house. but with fios my ping times suck during peak hours.



darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4

FiOS is no more or no less "shared" than DSL.


damasterjj

join:2012-02-22
Fort Wayne, IN
reply to damasterjj

I kinda wish I still have dsl, but I think frontier doesn't allow fios user to get dsl service right?



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to damasterjj

said by damasterjj:

yeah, but from what I read DSL is pretty much a dedicated line while fios is shared internet connection.

Everything is shared at some point. The more money you pay, the more dedicated your bandwidth is guaranteed up to a point. For a residential connection, it's shared bandwidth as soon as possible.

Between you and the CO, DSL is dedicated. But it's shared from the CO onwards. With FIOS, you are shared with 16 other users with BPON (Fort Wayne doesn't have GPON). Downstream bandwidth is 622mbits and each user's portion is dynamically controled by the OLT (headend) by acting as a gatekeeper. If the combined bandwidth is less than 622, everyone goes full speed up to their account level's limits (any faster and the OLT slows the flow). If bandwidth is saturated, then packets get sent in some type of a fair queuing order allowing everyone to have a slice of the bandwidth. Upstream is 155mbits/second and is evenly divided into 16 time slots, in a round robin order between the ONTs on that particular node. Upstream is round robin equally between nodes because up to 16 ONTs could be wanting to transmit at a time but they can't all talk, where downstream is controlled by a single device, the OLT, and can divide bandwidth more flexibly as needed.

Given a choice between DSL or FiOS, it's a no brainer, FiOS wins out for everything.

damasterjj

join:2012-02-22
Fort Wayne, IN
reply to damasterjj

according to frontier website high speed inter has "A dedicated connection that won't bog down during peak hours. There's no neighborhood sharing." from »www.frontier.com/products/Produc···=1&p=663



Ben J
Triple Play Architect
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

I wish Marketing would remove that. It is correct from a perspective (as cdru explained above), but one that is somewhat outdated and does not align with what most people think it means today. Back in the early days of Cable broadband, it was a distinct advantage that DSL had. A single cable user in your neighborhood could drag down the overall speed of everyone (like the old half-duplex LANs). This did not happen in DSL (which is closer to a modern full-duplex switch). It was not directly shared between several houses in your neighborhood, but upstream later with many many more users. No single user could affect any other single user with DSL, but at the aggregate, large numbers of users could still affect large numbers of users. That advantage is largely wiped out these days with newer cable plants, so most people no longer immediately correlate that bullet with highlighting the problem which previously plagued Cable. Unfortunately, it's one of those marketing bullets that just won't die.
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Transparency Disclosure and Disclaimer: I am a Frontier employee posting in my own personal capacity. The opinions and positions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of Frontier.