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HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to retired17

Re: how to reduce outside street noise

Here's one solution: »www.soundproofwindows.com/index.html Windows on the inside. Sort of an interior storm window.



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to retired17

Most window companies sell "Acoustical" windows. We had some road noise we wanted to reduce. We had newer double hung windows but upgraded to Acoustical windows anyways. A typical double hung windows as an STC (Sound Transmission Class) rating of around 24-28. A typical acoustical window has an STC of 40-48. The price wasn't all that much extra either. We got 4 different quotes and for normal double hungs it was ~$400 a window and for the acoustical windows it was ~$550 a window. The R-value also went up from ~3 on normal double hung to ~4 on the acoustic.
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to retired17

Also the company that installed the windows changed the installtion between normal double hung and acoustical windows. With acoustical windows they use a sound dampening caulk and insulation material in the installation. They also caulked the outside and inside of the window. With a normal double hung they just use normal caulk and insulation plus they only caulk the outside of the window. A proper installation of the window is just as important as the actual window.
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to retired17

Here's some additional info.

"STC rating measurement uses a special scale like the Richter Scale for earthquakes. An increase from 28 to 38 means 90% of the noise is reduced. A change from 28 to 43 represents a noise reduction of over 95%. Small increases can mean a lot of extra noise reduction. The increase from 38 to 43 mentioned above does not sound like much (90% versus 95+% in reductions) - but going from 90% to over 95% means that 60% of the remaining noise was removed; every number represents a large amount of noise."

"Dual Pane Windows will not Stop Noise

When good, thick dual pane windows rated at STC 35 are installed (replaced existing single pane windows with STC 27), the sound will not be reduced much.

Often, until the STC rating is up in the 40's, the noise is not reduced enough to stop it from being a significant problem. The human ear becomes more sensitive to sound as the volume reduces, so in many cases, more significant noise reductions are necessary to resolve the problem."

»www.soundproofwindows.com/technical.html
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."


patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1
reply to retired17

Sound proof windows and sound proof construction exist. I was looking at renting offices. I was in a building was on a 7 lane one street. Its practically an interstate. Open the windows any bit and it sounds like steam pipe exploded and it spewing steam, close the window, dead silence except for the lighting ballasts.



Natural

@videotron.ca
reply to retired17

There are also other ways to create a "natural" sound barrier.

Tree's planted in your yard it one way.



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by Natural :

There are also other ways to create a "natural" sound barrier.

Tree's planted in your yard it one way.

We've got a thick row of maples and pine trees plus a 6' solid wood fence. It helps a little on the first floor and doesn't do anything for the second floor. I'm sure that might help for some people under the right circumstances.
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
kudos:2
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·AT&T Midwest
·Time Warner Cable
reply to The Pig

said by The Pig:

honeycomb type window blinds!

Agreed. There's a very noticeable reduction in noise from my street-facing windows, when the honeycomb blinds are fully closed. Most of the time they are only half-closed, but either way they absorb proportionally more than nothing.


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to retired17

This is not a realistic possibility in your case, but I know a guy who used closed cell foam as his insulation and he swears that it would take a low-flying jet to hear anything outside.

I can't confirm if that's true, but my understanding is that foam (open or closed cell) is much better at deadening sound than it's fiberglass counterpart.



seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD
reply to John Galt

said by John Galt:

I had a traffic noise issue in my bedroom. I used a sound generator set to 'ocean' that did a fine job masking the sound of traffic. It didn't need to be very loud.

This is what we do as well, but with an air cleaner. You get the benefit of a constant source of white noise and cleaning the air you're breathing.

retired17
Premium
join:2007-01-24
Anaheim, CA

Thanks again for all your recent suggestions. I ordered a large 2 inch memory foam which I plan to place inside the window. Meanwhile I have been playing with my sound generator and discovered that the 'rain' option produces a sound rich in low frequencies. When I plugged it into my subwoofer, I got a sound that was very good at masking the street noise. Apparently the outside noise is primarily low frequency. And I didn't have to make it very loud either.



FutureMon
Ach Du Lieber
Premium,ExMod 2002-05
join:2000-10-05
Seaside, CA
Reviews:
·Suddenlink

When I had my house in Glendora, we were right up against the freeway. At first, the noise from the vehicles passing by was kind of annoying; but over time it actually became it's own "sound generator" of sorts.

We did end up putting in dual pane vinyl windows and it cut down the noise to probably 10% of what it was before; plus the outside of the home was coated with that hard foam stuff and painted over so it actually absorbed quite a bit of noise itself.

- FM
--
Q: How many theoretical physicists specializing in general relativity does it take to change a light bulb?
A: Two. One to hold the bulb and one to rotate the universe.



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

1 edit
reply to retired17

said by retired17:

Thanks again for all your recent suggestions. I ordered a large 2 inch memory foam which I plan to place inside the window. Meanwhile I have been playing with my sound generator and discovered that the 'rain' option produces a sound rich in low frequencies. When I plugged it into my subwoofer, I got a sound that was very good at masking the street noise. Apparently the outside noise is primarily low frequency. And I didn't have to make it very loud either.

Not sure what memory foam is going to do unless it's an egg crate shaped foam. The idea behind noise reduction is to trap and bounce the sound around to reduce it. Typically space/air is used to accomplish that. Popping a 2" square piece of foam onto the window might help a very small amount but it's just transferring the sound from the window to the foam without much if any reduction. If you got a 4" egg crate foam now you have air pockets that will trap and reduce the noise. Look at a recording studio or a sound chamber. They are all lined with egg crate looking stuff for that reason.
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to retired17

I'm in the same situation myself. It seems the noise is heard from my windows (they are new single pain cheap crap that the old owners replaced for me). Can someone post some links to new windows I can try?


retired17
Premium
join:2007-01-24
Anaheim, CA

As mentioned previously

www.soundproofwindows.com

seems to offer a good sound reducing window even though it has to be mounted on the inside. They don't touch the original window.



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

Are they expensive?



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by fartness:

Are they expensive?

I got a quote from them both before I went with acoustic windows. You can decide for yourself.

"Soundproof" windows (add-on to make an existing window into an acoustical window)
47x30 & 43x30 - $662 each
$210 per window installation
$50 packing per 5 windows
$90 per window shipping
State sales tax
Over $2,000 for the 2 windows

Acoustical windows
47x30 & 43x30 - $584 each
Installation included.
Packing included.
Shipping included.
State sales tax
Just under $1,200 for the two windows.

Both windows have the same soundproof rating average pretty much. Also the lead time on the 'soundproof' windows was 5-8 weeks while the acoustic windows were 4-6 weeks. I'd rather get a complete solution for less money then a retro fit solution for more money. Just my 2 cents.
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."


Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA
reply to retired17

I forgot to mention you get zero warranty with the 'soundproof' add-on windows. You will get a 7-12 year warranty on acoustical windows. Most likely you will increase your r-value and get an energy-star rating with acoustical windows over the retro fit 'soundproof' add-on windows as well. If there is a tax incentive in 2012 the 'soundproof' windows won't qualify. The acoustic windows will qualify for the tax incentive. We got $200 off the acoustic windows last year in tax incentives making the acoustic about 1/2 the price of the 'soundproof' add-on windows.
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to Spork35

$600 seems like a lot for one window. Would I be better off going to Home Depot and getting a $200 window and having someone install it for $50?



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by fartness:

$600 seems like a lot for one window. Would I be better off going to Home Depot and getting a $200 window and having someone install it for $50?

If you want a window yes. If you want to reduce noise a double or even triple pane window isn't going to do anything much. They are about 24-28 STC rating at best. You don't start getting into the noise reduction category until you hit 35-38 STC. An acoustic window is 40-48 STC. On the plus side if you have really bad windows now the STC might be like 16-18 so you might notice a very small improvement with new 24-28 STC windows.

You might be able to get away with something like this.
»www.homedepot.com/Doors-Windows-···Id=10051
--
"Every once in a while, declare peace....it confuses the hell out of your enemies."