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iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast

[Wi-Fi] If you want a solid router...

...and are willing to pay $140 for it, I just today got the Amped Wireless R10000G to replace my Engenius ESR9850, which has been relegated to repeater duty in order to bring Comcastic goodness to all three levels of my seven-unit apartment mini-complex.

I've used various routers in the past in similar configurations (Linksys WRT310N, Encore EHNWI-2AN3, maybe an Asus in there somewhere) but the Amped has a better, less laggy admin UI and just does a really good job putting a wireless signal out there, maxing out my 25/4 (plus PowerBoost, so more like 35/6) connection through several walls and a floor, something I haven't been able to do in the same environment with another router.

Of course, the 600mW output and 5dbi antennas on the unit are the primary reasons why the system works better now than it did before, but I have to give Amped credit for making a very slick GUI and doing pretty well with routing performance and jitter, even though the router doesn't have USB ports or N900 capability like the other router I thought about buying, the upcoming Asus "Dark Knight." Then again, I have a nettop that I can use for NAS and printer sharing duties (as well as media center duties), so I don't particularly need a router that can do that stuff.

SmallNetBuilder recommended this router, or did so by proxy due to phenomenal throughput numbers on their wireless and routing test suites.

So, anyone have any similar "this is an awesome wireless router" stories to share?


ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA

Can you post UI pictures ?



Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:9
reply to iansltx

Looks good for coverage, but it lacks the 5GHz band & USB for network storage/Printer.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast

As mentioned in my post, I don't need USB so that part works just fine for me

As for 5GHz, the idea of 5GHz on a router designed for long-range communications is...a bit oxymoronic unfortunately. Particularly when you're trying to push a signal through walls indoors



Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:9

I use my 5GHz band for clients in a relative distance inside my dwelling, while using the 2.4GHz band for clients outside my dwelling. It's also my choice to join either of my networks at will.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast

That's fair, but what's the performance like on 5GHz vs. 2.4? If you're just trying to isolate clients based on some network type, VAPs on this router do a decent job *shrugs*. Also, I have a fair number of devices (phones, tablets) that dont support 5GHz anyway, so while it would be a kind of nice feature it's far from needed in my use case


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast
reply to ExoticFish

How about a full-on screencast?

»youtu.be/0sJvoqL-p34


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:9
reply to iansltx

Performance is exactly why I segregate only a few clients to the 5GHz band. Throughput is no comparison while doing large data transfers. The 5GHz network is used primarily for only 3 laptops that do have full shared permissions to not only access my network HDD, but each other. The 2.4GHz band provides for the remainder of the 25 "G" & "N" clients that do not have access permission to each other but to the HDD.
--
In God we trust; all others bring data!


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2

Makes sense.

What router are you using?



Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:9

I have the WRT610N v2. The "V2" is the less problematic version.



Tobin

join:2003-09-21
Burlingame, CA
reply to Johkal

That is exactly what I do with my home network. My most important devices like my NAS, desktops and laptops have access to my 5GHz network. I have 2.4GHz SSID for devices that don't support 5GHz like my iPhone and Eye-Fi. Then I have a guest network on the 2.4GHz band so I don't have to hand out my WPA2 keys to random houseguests.

I was using a WRT610N v1. Never had any problems with the hardware plus DD-WRT, but recently switched back to my AirPort Extreme router.


n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA
reply to iansltx


FTP test w/two Win7 PCs
I purchased a Netgear WNDR3700 v2 a week ago. So far it's been working exceptionally well. It fits all of my criteria: dual-band wireless, relatively fast SoC/routing, and a decent amount of RAM. It replaced a freebie Linksys WRT150N, which replaced a WRT54GL about a month ago (had the GL since 2006).

The 5 GHz coverage is slightly less than 2.4 in my house, but that was to be expected. The main benefit is the lack of interference from other routers/APs. Doing a site survey on 2.4 shows 14-18 other signals in my neighborhood, whereas nothing else shows up on 5. My TouchPad easily hits 35 Mbps on it.

As for routing performance, well, take a look at the picture . I'm not sure exactly what Netgear did with the stock firmware to get it to such high throughput levels, but even with DD-WRT it's WAY more than I need. DD-WRT runs well on it too. The web interface is snappy and it's been stable so far. It's easy to flash it on there, and the router's recovery mode makes it easy to recover from a failed flash.
--
KI6RIT


cork1958
Cork
Premium
join:2000-02-26

That picture just isn't right?!

My Linksys E2000 get's EXACTLY the same throughput with or without DD-WRT.

Yes, I do see that your router isn't a Linksys.
--
The Firefox alternative.
»www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/



mb

join:2000-07-23
Washington, NJ
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to iansltx

said by iansltx:

...Of course, the 600mW output and 5dbi antennas on the unit are the primary reasons why the system works better now than it did before...

Don't foreget, power output at the router is only one half of the equation. You are using a duplex (two-way) connection and if it doesn't "hear" the remote device well throughput will suffer.


r81984
Fair and Balanced
Premium
join:2001-11-14
Katy, TX
Reviews:
·row44
reply to iansltx

600mW means nothing if your remote device is not powerful to go through walls to talk back to the router.
Tablets/phones can be as low as 10mW while laptops around 20 to 50 mW.

Higher gain antennas will help you receive the weaker signals, but 600mW of transmitting power will not help you at all unless you have a device that can transmit back close to that.

You could have flashed your WRT310N with DD-WRT and added external antennas »www.ebay.com/itm/7dBi-Antenna-Mo···95703653
--
...brought to you by Carl's Jr.


Emiya

join:2006-03-30
Southington, OH

1 recommendation

reply to n_w95482

DD-WRT is slow at routing because it's got a decent SPI firewall as well as a lot of other bells and whistles. If you search their forums this is already well known. The Kong Mod releases are much faster at routing if your router is supported: »www.myopenrouter.com/download/19···-Samba3/

Also, 5GHz will always have less range and penetration to 2.4GHz, it's the nature of RF. Lower freqs have better range.


n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA

said by Emiya:

DD-WRT is slow at routing because it's got a decent SPI firewall as well as a lot of other bells and whistles. If you search their forums this is already well known. The Kong Mod releases are much faster at routing if your router is supported: »www.myopenrouter.com/download/19···-Samba3/

Also, 5GHz will always have less range and penetration to 2.4GHz, it's the nature of RF. Lower freqs have better range.

Yeah, I figured there was something under the hood that made it slower, but 210/133 is several times more than what I need currently. I'll stick with the current DD-WRT build for now.

As for 5 GHz range, I know about that already . My house is small enough where the differences are negligible.
--
KI6RIT

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
reply to r81984

I had DD-WRT on my 310N. The last DD-WRT upgrade I attempted on the router resulted in a complete and utter brick

As for external antennae, I didn't feel like modding the router.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast
reply to r81984

As for the huge imbalance of power between the router and its clients, it isn't just the transmit power difference that improves coverage. The router has a low-noise Rx amp as well, which I'm sure doesn't make up for really low power WiFi chipsets in some devices but does help.



r81984
Fair and Balanced
Premium
join:2001-11-14
Katy, TX
Reviews:
·row44
reply to iansltx

said by iansltx:

I had DD-WRT on my 310N. The last DD-WRT upgrade I attempted on the router resulted in a complete and utter brick

As for external antennae, I didn't feel like modding the router.

You have to install certain firmwares made for the 310N or it will brick.
Your router can be un bricked most likely with TFTP or by connecting a JTAG cable. - »www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Re···ad_Flash

All that expensive router has that is helping your range is the extended antennas, there are plenty of much cheaper routers that have external antennas connections that you can just swap the antennas for higher gain antennas.

If you dont want to unbrick your router you should try to sell it in the for sale section, someone will probably buy it off you.
--
...brought to you by Carl's Jr.

KevTech
Premium
join:2002-08-22
Seattle, WA

1 recommendation

reply to iansltx

Not sure I would want to spend that much money on something that does not have a 5GHz radio or support IPv6 since ISP's will start deployment this year.

I just bought a RT-N66U about a month ago and am really happy with it so far.