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telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to DrDrew

Re: [HD] Get Ready for "Ultra-HDTV"

said by DrDrew:

How long until Weather Channel Local on 8's is available in 4K?

BTW, 39" 4K??? You'll to sit so close you can touch it to see the difference from 1080p.... 4' or less.
»carltonbale.com/1080p-does-matter/

NBC News had a report on the new 4K UHDTV sets, saying they are not worth the cost for most people:

NBC News: Don't Buy 4K TV's Picture Claims
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 16, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/tvoneone121613.htm


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

said by telcodad:

Netflix is now testing streaming Ultra-HD content in preparation for a full launch sometime next year:

Netflix Begins 4K Streaming Tests
Netflix Posts Small Batch of 4K Footage Ahead of Anticipated 2014 Launch

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - November 3, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···s/146463

YouTube is also preparing for 4K U-HD:

YouTube ‘ready for 4k’
Advanced Television - November 20, 2013
»advanced-television.com/2013/11/···-for-4k/

Amazon Studios says it plans to start shooting in 4K soon also:

Amazon Studios To Give 4K A Shot
Pilots Selected For ‘Full’ Series Production Will Be Filmed in 4K In 2014

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - December 16, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/technology/···t/147246


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

Netflix is now testing streaming Ultra-HD content in preparation for a full launch sometime next year:

Netflix Begins 4K Streaming Tests
Netflix Posts Small Batch of 4K Footage Ahead of Anticipated 2014 Launch

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - November 3, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···s/146463

A blog item on the MCN site today:

Netflix’s 4K Plan Starts To Clear Up
By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - December 18, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/blogs/baumi···ts-clear


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

NBC News had a report on the new 4K UHDTV sets, saying they are not worth the cost for most people:

NBC News: Don't Buy 4K TV's Picture Claims
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 16, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/tvoneone121613.htm

On the other hand, a British site, HDTVTest.co.uk, found a clear viewer preference for 4K UHDTV:

4K TV Beats 1080p HDTV In 'Pepsi Test'
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 18, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/tvtv121813.htm


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to DrDrew

said by DrDrew:

Yeah... I think current 4k displays without HEVC or HDMI 2.0 hardware are like the early HDTVs with 5:4 CRTs and non-HCDP DVI interfaces. They're strictly for early adopters not particularly concerned with replacing their too soon for prime time displays. Japan seems to be big on launching gear like that.... stuff pre-standard that's obsolete or incompatible with main stream gear released later. Most of the rest of the world hates dealing with that.

And once we get those features standardized in 4K HDTVs, here's some more enhancements that Dolby Labs is now pushing for:

Dolby Proposing Disruptive New Imaging Format, But Can It Slow The 4K Train?
New consumer displays will be unveiled at CES that go beyond 4K resolution, offering a wider color gamut and higher luminance, the company says. Movies supporting the new format could also be on the way.
by Carolyn Giardina, The Hollywood Reporter - December 17, 2013
»www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind···g-666400


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

The network announcements about testing/moving to 4K U-HD are coming out more and more now:

3net Eyes 4K Expansion in 2014
Sony/Imax/Discovery J.V. 'Prepared' To Produce Up To 80 Hours Of Ultra HD Fare Next Year, CEO Says

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - December 19, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···4/147319



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

Hopefully, this will get HEVC/H.265 capable devices out there sooner:

ViXS Begins Shipments of Industry's First SoC to Support Ultra HD 4K and 10-bit
HEVCXCode 6400 Enables New Consumer Devices with Stunning Image Color and Clarity
ViXS press release, Canadian NewsWire - Dec. 18, 2013
»www.newswire.ca/en/story/1282313···bit-hevc



RUNDMC

@comcast.net
reply to telcodad

You do know DirecTV also charges a fee to get HD right? They call it their "Advanced Reciever Fee" and it is anywhere from $10-$25, more then what Comcast charges.


dishrich

join:2006-05-12
Springfield, IL

But you DO realize that Adv Rcvr fee ALSO includes the WH DVR fee as well - which applies to ALL receivers on an account. And not to mention that D* ONLY charges $6 per added receiver - regardless of what kind of receiver it is.

Unless you get one of the bloated "XF Complete" pkgs from CC, the DVR fee on CC (usually $8) applies PER DVR box - which is on top of the regular A/O charge of (usually) $10 per DVR.



RUNDMC

@comcast.net

The Comcast HD fee also applies to all receivers on the account and there's no need to get multiple DVR's with the new X1 you just pay for the regular AO price. If it isn't included in your package then the X1 is $10 and the HD fee is $9.95, still less then the $25 advanced receiver fee (which can be reduced if you jump through hoops and follow certain guidlines). I've had every service from Comcast to Direct, Dish, Uverse, and WOW and Comcast by far has the most consistent service and the fewest hidden fees. Direct and Dish are pros at adding random fees and hiding them every way they know how.


dishrich

join:2006-05-12
Springfield, IL

4 edits

said by RUNDMC :

The Comcast HD fee also applies to all receivers on the account and there's no need to get multiple DVR's with the new X1 you just pay for the regular AO price.

You obviously then have NOT heard of the 5-tuner WH Genie, which is the same thing as X1 - & which is priced VERY similar to X1; it (too) only requires 1 DVR for all TV's.
You obviously also missed the part of the cheaper A/O ($6) on D* vs $10 on CC.

If it isn't included in your package then the X1 is $10

Try $13
So to correct you, on CC it's $10 HD tech fee & $13 X1 (WH DVR) fee - WOW, a whole $2 LESS than D*
Once you add on a 2nd full (NON-DTA) outlet on CC, you just lost that $2 savings...

I've had every service from Comcast to Direct, Dish, Uverse

I currently have 3 out of these 4 services NOW (one IS CC), as well as I installed both sat services for many years - so I AM VERY well versed (too) on who has EXACTLY what random fees, thank you very much!

Comcast by far has the most consistent service and the fewest hidden fees.

It only takes a quick simple search on this (& other) sites to find MANY people that would totally disagree with you on this point...oh, you must have forgot about CC's new broadcast TV fee being added on to all TV subs bills next month, that neither sat company has (yet)...

»Comcast Rate Hikes Expand, Adds New 'Broadcast TV' Fee

BOTTOM LINE - CC is just AS bad (or good, in your case ) of piling on the bogus hidden fees; people simply have to do their due diligence to find out what (all) the fees they will be assessed, & go with which provider fits their needs & budget.


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to RUNDMC

said by telcodad:

While Comcast is still charging us an "HD Technology" fee, it looks like DirecTV is already planning for "Ultra-HDTV"

said by RUNDMC :

You do know DirecTV also charges a fee to get HD right? They call it their "Advanced Reciever Fee" and it is anywhere from $10-$25, more then what Comcast charges.

My point with that statement back in March 2012, was that Comcast was (and still is) charging extra for HD service, while other providers (like DISH) are now treating HD as nothing special, and that U-HDTV is right around the corner, making HD even more "old hat."

However, I do realize that Comcast can only pack 2 or 3 compressed HD channels into a 256-QAM video carrier vs. 10 to 12 SD ones, so that transmitting HD programming costs them somewhat more (plus they are sometimes charged a bit more for the HD feed by the program supplier), but $120/year extra to get HD in the 21st Century just seems a bit excessive to me.

Thankfully they abandoned their previous idea of charging us a "Color Technology" fee!

dishrich

join:2006-05-12
Springfield, IL

1 edit

said by telcodad:

while other providers (like DISH) are now treating HD as nothing special,

Sorry to have to tell you this, but DISH IS now going to start charging NEW subs for HD on/after 1/17/2014 - JUST LIKE CC & DTV DO! Existing HD for life subs are grandfathered in...at least for now.
It will be like DTV; FREE for the 1st 2 years, then $10 after: (unless presumably subs call in & bitch about it! )

»www.satelliteguys.us/threads/326···t3326084


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3

said by dishrich:

Sorry to have to tell you this, but DISH IS now going to start charging NEW subs for HD on/after 1/17/2014 - JUST LIKE CC & DTV DO! Existing HD for life subs are grandfathered in...at least for now.
:
»www.satelliteguys.us/threads/326···t3326084

Oh well, I just remembered seeing those old "HD is free with DISH Network" commercials that used to be on TV, didn't realize it was a limited-time offer.

Karl also just put out a news item about DISH price increases for 2014: »Dish Says They'll Be Raising Rates in 2014

dishrich

join:2006-05-12
Springfield, IL

said by telcodad:

didn't realize it was a limited-time offer.

Neither did anyone else - including their dealers...who are understandably NOT happy about this; others are saying DISH has totally lost it's mind!

Obviously DISH is not sharing this publicly; of course, they didn't have much choice of the public finding out immediately, thanks to the sat forums, LOL...


RUNDMC

@comcast.net
reply to dishrich

1. I am wll aware of the Genie and it's capabilities. I still prefer the X1 with its search features, guide, better apps, last 9, On Demand, etc.

2. I have the X1 paying full price and am only paying $10. A quick search shows me most areas are $10 for the X1 so I'm not sure of your area but in the majority of the Comcast serviced areas the price is less.

3. Yes Comcast is getting the $1.50 Broadcast fee but you are WRONG in your statement that Satellite has no such fee. DirecTV has their "Regional Sports Fee" which is $3.00, twice that of Comcast's new broadcast fee.

4. No company is perfect. They all have their advantages, disadvantages, etc, but overall I have found Comcast to be the best. Living in the Midwest especially I'd rather not have to sign a two year contract for constant signal interruptions in the winter. Not to mention if I want a decent internet speed I would have to get that elsewhere and any small savings I may get on the cable portion with satellite is gone when I pay full price elsewhere for a good internet speed.


dishrich

join:2006-05-12
Springfield, IL

1 edit

said by RUNDMC :

I have the X1 paying full price and am only paying $10. A quick search shows me most areas are $10 for the X1 so I'm not sure of your area but in the majority of the Comcast serviced areas the price is less.

Well I looked at our new rate sheets that just came this week in our bills, & actually in our area, X1 (WHD) is actually $11 for the primary MR DVR...so I will stand corrected on that.
BUT, I still stand by the other statement re: 2nd & above A/O's eating up the $4-$5 (any) savings.

said by RUNDMC :

DirecTV has their "Regional Sports Fee" which is $3.00, twice that of Comcast's new broadcast fee.

Yes, but they do not charge it in ALL areas - including mine; it's basically areas that have multiple RSN's for that particular area. (think NYC area that is now up to FOUR RSN's)
CC, OTOH, is charging the broadcast fee everywhere...but I would expect this, since ALL broadcasters are doing this now, to ALL TV providers.

said by RUNDMC :

Not to mention if I want a decent internet speed I would have to get that elsewhere and any small savings I may get on the cable portion with satellite is gone when I pay full price elsewhere for a good internet speed.

Agree, & not to also mention that if you get standalone internet from CC, they sock you that $15 (added) no-other-services penalty...


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

Phillip Swann of TVPredictions.com is predicting that 4K U-HDTV srt sales will exceed current CEA estimates:

Predictions For 2014: 4K TV Sales Will Surprise
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 28, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/prediction···2813.htm



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

said by wolf :

Personally I'm hanging my hopes on OLED much more so than 4k. OLED promises better color reproduction, contrast, less power consumption & motion blur, thinner displays, wider viewing angles etc. And OLED doesn't preclude 4k, Sony showed a 56" prototype OLED 4k set earlier this year (»www.slashgear.com/sony-our-56-in···5296449/).
:
OLED has the promise of being a game-changer in terms of PQ, where increased resolution just becomes an add-on to the basic technology that should far out-perform LCD & Plasma.

Yes, I agree, as I posted before: »Re: [HD] Get Ready for "Ultra-HDTV"

FYI - LG Electronics will be unveiling their new OLED TV lineup at next week's 2014 CES, including their 77-inch class curved 4K UHDTV OLED model, the 77EC9800, along with various new 55- and 65-inch class OLED models:

LG To Showcase OLED TV Lineup At CES 2014
LG OLED TV Brings Its Full Range of Cutting-edge Products to Las Vegas's Annual Electronics Extravaganza
LG Press Release, PR Newswire - January 2, 2014
»www.prnewswire.com/news-releases···501.html

Also an article on the TVPredictions.com site about it: »www.tvpredictions.com/tv010214.htm


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to DrDrew

OK DrDrew See Profile, do you think this 4K UHDTV set has a sufficiently large screen size to take full advantage of 2160p material?

Samsung Selling a 110-inch 4K TV
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 30, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/tv123013.htm



wolf

@comcast.net

According to Sony & NHK the 4k rule of thumb for optimal viewing distance is 1.5 times the height of the display (they base this on a display picture fully immersing the viewer's field of vision but there are differing opinions out there about this). For 16:9 format displays Height = Diagonal size times 0.49. So a 110" tv would have an approximate height of 54", and a (Sony) optimum viewing distance of 81", or slightly less than 7 feet. That seems like a realistic distance to sit from your tv, unlike for let's say a 60" tv that calls for a distance of approx. 3.7 feet. On the other hand when I stand 4 feet from my 52" 1080p tv the relative picture size seems immense to the point of overwhelming my field of vision so...

The bigger questions about a 110" tv would be how many people have viewing rooms that can accommodate this size, the power consumption (and sheer weight) of such a tv & if their spouse would allow it. In other words the necessity of scaling up the display size to levels where the extra 4k picture detail is visible (as a factor of viewing distance) versus the more practical considerations around accomodating displays of that size in real-life living rooms.

I've read (and agree with) opinions about 4k that most viewers will most likely not change their current viewing distance solely based on availability of TV's with greater resolution. In other words if they sit 9' feet from their current 1080p tv then they'll most likely still sit about 9' from their new 4k tv as well, especially given the same/similar diagonal tv size (also since this is often dictated by the physical space requirements of the room). This is what really necessitates much larger display sizes for 4k, if the goal is to maximize the visible detail or even be able to see differences vs 1080p. Comfort and aesthetics tend to overrule technical requirements. Presumably making viewers change their viewing distance requires selling them bigger TV's which they can hopefully fit into their living rooms. How big would a tv have to be to make you rearrange your living room, assuming you can fit it in? Then again here's a recent side-by-side test claiming that viewers can tell the difference in detail of 1080p vs 4k on 55" TV's at a distance of 9': »www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/4k-resol···3517.htm.

Again, the bigger issues that trump sheer resolution numbers are other factors such as contrast/dynamic range, color accuracy/saturation & motion blur. I think that Dolby is going down the right path in focusing on those other (and arguably more important) factors instead of concentrating almost exclusively on the resolution numbers (which is how most 4k TV's to date seem to have been marketed): »advanced-television.com/2013/12/···ltra-hd/.



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

Well, you know that whenever/wherever there's new digital content, there's bound to be new DRM closely following it:

SeeQVault Ushers in New Era of Content Mobility
Panasonic, Samsung, Sony and Toshiba technology creates new business opportunities for High Definition/4K Ultra High Definition viewing, flexibility and security

SeeQVault Press Release, Business Wire - January 2, 2014
»www.businesswire.com/news/home/2···Mobility



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3

1 edit
reply to SpHeRe31459

said by SpHeRe31459:

said by DrDrew:

BTW, 39" 4K??? You'll to sit so close you can touch it to see the difference from 1080p.... 4' or less.

What's more the Seiki is a big pile of junk, it's the kind of cheapo Chinese TV that you'd get for like $150 on Black Friday if it were just a 1080p model.

BTW - A 50-inch Polaroid-branded 4K UHDTV (by Empire Electronics, a Polaroid licensee) will be debuting at the CES with an MSRP of $1,000. The Polaroid 50GSR9000 UHDTV is part of a new line of 4K TVs with screen sizes ranging from 32 to 69 inches:

Polaroid to offer smart TV with built-in Roku Stick
By Brian Santo, CED Magazine - January 2, 2014
»www.cedmagazine.com/news/2014/01···ku-stick

EDIT: The Polaroid Press Release: »www.businesswire.com/news/home/2···tainment


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

said by mikedz4:

so 3d (lifelike) tv is on it's way out?

Well, it certainly looks like that, at least until glasses-free 3DTV is perfected. 4K U-HDTV is the new fad with TV manufacturers now.

See this earlier thread: »More on the death of 3DTV

and:

Is 3-D dead?
First ESPN dropped their 3-D sports channel. Now the BBC is putting a hold on 3-D. Is 3-D doomed?
By Robin Harris, ZDNet - July 8, 2013
»www.zdnet.com/is-3-d-dead-7000017767/

Well, it looks like Stream TV Networks is trying to revive 3DTV now with its 4K U-HDTVs that feature their "Ultra-D" glasses-free 3D technology:

Stream TV to Present Consumer-Ready 4KTVs with Glasses-Free 3D at CES 2014
Stream TV Press Release, PR Newswire - December 30, 2013
»www.prnewswire.com/news-releases···121.html


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

YouTube is also preparing for 4K U-HD:

YouTube ‘ready for 4k’
Advanced Television - November 20, 2013
»advanced-television.com/2013/11/···-for-4k/

Looks like YouTube will be demonstrating their 4K streaming capability at next week’s CES:

YouTube Casts An Early 4K Vote
By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - January 2, 2014
»www.multichannel.com/blogs/baumi···-4k-vote


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

Phillip Swann of TVPredictions.com is predicting that 4K U-HDTV srt sales will exceed current CEA estimates:

Predictions For 2014: 4K TV Sales Will Surprise
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 28, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/prediction···2813.htm

Phillip Swann also has an article today regarding next week's CES 2014 »www.tvpredictions.com/ces010314.htm in which he looks for "10 big TV questions that could be answered during the CES," where all but 2 of them involve 4K U-HDTV, OLED and/or 3DTV:
quote:
1. Will 4K TV Makers Convince America Their Sets Really Offer a Better Picture?
Since the introduction of the 4K TV at the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show, display experts, tech pundits and just about anyone who has entered a Best Buy has debated whether it delivers a better picture than today's 1080p HDTVs. While no one doubts that the 4K TV has more pixels, some display analysts say the average consumer can't see a difference unless the TV is enormous (65 inches or bigger) and/or they sit a few feet away from the screen. 4K TV makers need to bury that argument in Vegas if they want consumers to pay a few thousand dollars or more to buy a large-screen 4K set.

2. Will the OLED TV Be Regarded As a Credible Technology?
The ultra-sleek TV delivers a dazzling picture and it looks fantastic with a panel as thin as 0.15 inches. But Sony and Panasonic just dumped their partnership to make OLED sets, noting the difficulty in mass producing them, largely because of those thin panels. LG and Samsung, the only companies making OLED sets now, will have to persuade the press that OLED's future is as bright as its picture.

3. Will 4K TV Makers Announce Lower Prices?
The other big obstacle facing the 4K TV is the lofty price tag. Samsung, for instance, just began selling a 110-inch 4K set for $150,000. That's the kind of lavish announcement that tells consumers to stay away. But we might see TV makers take advantage of the media spotlight to introduce some 4K sets at affordable prices. Polaroid has already said it will introduce a 50-inch 4K TV for $999, but it would be interesting if Sony and Samsung followed suit with significant price drops.

5. Will Google's 4K Streaming Codec Win Hearts & Eyes?
Google says it has developed a streaming technology, called VP9, that will deliver 4K streaming video at half the bandwidth required of today's high-def streams. The streams will be showcased at several booths on the show floor. Will the press be impressed? If so, it could go a long way to making Google's codec an industry standard -- and give 4K TV buyers something to watch in 2014 and beyond.

6. Will the Curved-Screen Be Seen As a Gimmick?
LG and Samsung are now selling curved-screen OLED TV, but other TV makers have introduced curved-screen LED sets. This will be the first time that most journalists will get a look at them. Do they truly offer a more immersive experience when watching TV, as the TV makers say. Or will they be seen as just a gimmick, not worth the extra money?

7. Could No-Glasses 3D TVs Revive the 3D TV
A few companies are expected to showcase 3D TVs that don't require glasses, one of the many things that consumers have said they hate about current 3D sets. Would an affordable, glasses-free 3D TV trigger new interest in the concept of watching 3D at home?

8. What Does Netflix Have Planned?
Netflix has been experimenting with a host of new features, from a new pricing structure to 4K streaming. The company might use CES to announce to some new partnerships as well as some technological innovations.

10. What Will Be Labeled 'The Next Big Thing?'
What new product or innovation will capture the attendees' fancy? Could it be a flexible display TV or mobile device? The curved-screen TV? The 4K TV? Every year, the press seems to become fixated on a particular product and declares it the next big thing. That doesn't mean it will eventually become a winner at retail. The OLED TV was a hit at CES 2012, for instance. But the added press coverage does help get people interested.


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

OK DrDrew See Profile, do you think this 4K UHDTV set has a sufficiently large screen size to take full advantage of 2160p material?

Samsung Selling a 110-inch 4K TV
By Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com - December 30, 2013
»www.tvpredictions.com/tv123013.htm

LG is showing a 105-inch 4K U-HDTV at this week's CES:

CES 2014: LG to Unveil 105-inch, Cinema-Wide 4K TV
TVPredictions.com - January 5, 2014
»www.tvpredictions.com/tv010514.htm


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3

1 edit
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

said by telcodad:

Netflix is now testing streaming Ultra-HD content in preparation for a full launch sometime next year:

Netflix Begins 4K Streaming Tests
Netflix Posts Small Batch of 4K Footage Ahead of Anticipated 2014 Launch

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - November 3, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···s/146463

A blog item on the MCN site today:

Netflix’s 4K Plan Starts To Clear Up
By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - December 18, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/blogs/baumi···ts-clear

FYI - On the B&C site today:

CES: Netflix To Stream 4K Content on LG TVs
'House of Cards' will be available in UltraHD in 2014
By George Winslow, Broadcasting & Cable - January 6, 2014
»www.broadcastingcable.com/news/t···s/128266

EDIT: LG's press release: »www.prnewswire.com/news-releases···461.html


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3
reply to SpHeRe31459

said by SpHeRe31459:

said by telcodad:

Not sure how good their U-HDTV sets are (e.g., a 4K mode refresh rate of only 30Hz), but SEIKI Digital has released some 4K U-HDTV sets at some (relatively) low prices - an MSRP of $1500 for their SE50UY04 50-inch set and an MSRP of $699 for their SE39UY04 39-inch set, with plans to release a 65-inch model by this fall:

SEIKI Expands Its 4K Ultra HDTV Line With A New 39-inch Model
SEIKI to Introduce a 65-inch 4K Model by Fall 2013

Press Release, PR Newswire - June 24, 2013
»www.prnewswire.com/news-releases···501.html

The Seiki is barebones, super cheap Chinese stuff. It has poor black levels, inaccurate settings, and no ability to really be tweaked. A bunch of legit home theater reviewers have had hands on with it and found it to be terrible at dealing with anything but perfect 1080p and 4k material, which of course means all cable and DVD content looks like crap on it. As you could imagine that means they cheaped out on any kind of proper scaling/deinterlacing that becomes critically important at three times the resolution of 1080p.

 
A recent WSJ article on the coming wave of these cheap, Chinese 4K U-HDTV sets:

Inexpensive Ultra High-Definition TVs on Horizon
Strong China Demand Has Set Makers Aiming to Quickly Lower Prices
By Kana Inagaki and Jonathan Cheng, The Wall Street Journal - January 2, 2014
»online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB1···76600834
quote:
Meanwhile, Japanese TV makers are trying to justify their price tags by using extra chips that adapt regular high-definition content so an improvement is noticeable on 4K sets. The picture quality of moving images, analysts say, is also superior, with colors and details that can capture water drops, the shadow of a fire and beads of sweat.

LG's Mr. Alessi says he fears that the lack of such features on the less-expensive Chinese-made sets will give UHDTV a bad name.

"Side-by-side comparison tends to show a big difference," says Paul Gagnon, director of North American TV research at NPD DisplaySearch. "The question is whether or not it is worth two times the price. That's something that's going to take time to figure out."

Chinese companies such as Skyworth Digital Holdings Ltd. and Sichuan Changhong Electric Co. are determined to crack the global market, aided recently by low-cost display panels from Taiwan.

Xu Ming, general manager of Changhong Multimedia Business Co., a unit of Sichuan Changhong, concedes that the quality of entry-level Chinese 4K TVs lags that of companies like Sony and Samsung Electronics Co. ...



telcodad

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reply to telcodad

An article on the Seattle Times site today:

CES 2014: Breakout year for 4K TV
By Brier Dudley, The Seattle Times - January 6, 2014
»blogs.seattletimes.com/brierdudl···r-4k-tv/