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ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA
reply to KrK

RaspberryPI is a bunch of BS and binary blobs from Broadcom

RaspberryPI is a bunch of BS with no documentation and, subsequently, no open-source support (if you don't believe it, google what Theo de Raadt had to say about it).

If anything, the standard arm linux off-the-shelf routers are more available and are both cheaper and have better support than RaspberryPI.

The advantage of going x86, however, is that most of the router solutions featured over here don't run on the off-the-shelf arm-based routers at all. Most people praise pfSense (based on FreeBSD) or straight pf on OpenBSD, and both require x86 (unless you have some rare non-x86 hardware like landisk that OpenBSD does support, too). Personally, I think netbooks (w/ USB GigE sticks) is as best as you can get to the state-of-the-art DIY home router for the average home, both in terms of open architecture, price, space, power consumption, flexibility and, last but not least, the free integrated UPS. (-: (Of course, if you are a true power hungry user or simply have real broadband internet (like nearly noone in the US has — 18/1.5 is not broadband), a netbook processor and USB GigE may easily be the bottleneck.)

I'm looking forward to the time when someone will come up with a USB 3.0 to 4-port GigE switch, as well as USB 3.0 making it onto the netbooks. (-:



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

Click for full size
Here's what I have acting as a server.

It's a Gigabyte GA-H55M-SV2 running an Intel I3-550 (integrated video). It's running of all things, Vista Ultimate x64, I started with Windows XP Pro, but there was some sort of incompatibility (Slips my mind) and so Vista was the only other OS I own.

All it does is run a dedicated Minecraft Server, an FTP Server and stores backed up files, so not quite a router. The nice thing is that it only uses between 38 and 43 watts.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini


jap
Premium
join:2003-08-10
038xx
reply to ConstantineM

said by ConstantineM:

RaspberryPI is a bunch of BS with no documentation and, subsequently, no open-source support (if you don't believe it, google what Theo de Raadt had to say about it).

Link please. Maybe my search skills suddenly suck. The ale certainly doesn't.

I want to see what sort of nutjob writes articles lambasting Raspberry Pi for lack of documentation & support. It's a deliberately uber cheap, half-baked learning tool for school kids created by a registered non-profit. It's not supposed to have any support or an abundance of documentation. de Raadt is an ass if he wrote the things you claim.

The fact that non-edu buyers are swarming to the board is actually a bit awkward. It undermines the applied learning challenge when semi-pro implementation solutions are everywhere. In any event the $25 price point, the overwhelming buzz, and the "buy one, give one" purchase incentive will get the board into the hands of many more students. Development of purpose-specific embedded linux devices is an excellent thing to be preparing young minds for. In my humble opinion.

To make amends for your vilifying ways I suggest you donate a dozen to your nearest, most under funded tech club or vocational training program.

- - - -

@Ryan, Sorry for taking the Raspberry Pi comments OT. Had to come to the defense of a good social project. Of course it's a ridiculous board for creating a deployable software router. To settle that the specs are here.

Count me in with the electricity/noise/heat/space issue of using old large formfactor hardware. Many early atom-based netbooks are being tossed and I'm wondering how robust a solution they are a good for. Not major enterprise but perhaps a better-than-consumer option adequate for small/med biz and big home net applications.

ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA

Raspberry PI w/ binary blobs from Broadcom still suck

You have no clue what you're talking about in regards to open-source systems programming.

From the official FAQ:
»www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

What hardware documentation will be available?

Broadcom don’t release a full datasheet for the BCM2835, which is the chip at the heart of the Raspberry Pi. We will release a datasheet for the SoC which will cover the hardware exposed on the Raspi board e.g. the GPIOs. We will also release a board schematic later on.
...

Translation: we'll release 205 pages out of a 4000+ page document.

»www.raspberrypi.org/forum/featur···atasheet
»www.raspberrypi.org/forum/featur···/page-11

Compare and contrast:

»www.raspberrypi.org/wp-content/u···rals.pdf (205 pages)
»www.ti.com/lit/ug/spruh73c/spruh73c.pdf (4593 pages)

It doesn't take much Google skill to figure out that this question is indeed frequently asked and commented on, BTW. And it is also rather clear that the answer doesn't satisfy system programmers at all.


jap
Premium
join:2003-08-10
038xx

said by ConstantineM:

You have no clue what you're talking about in regards to open-source systems programming.

You have no clue what you're talking about in regards to diving for sea urchins.

Forget about the de Raadt article. I'll assume his perspective is similarly fixated. Context is everything.

ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA

The difference being is that I'm not talking about diving for sea urchins.

Forget about Raspberry PI, you still don't even know who de Raadt is! He didn't write any articles! Context is indeed everything, and Raspberry PI is hardly worth being mentioned in unrelated discussions, let alone praised. Unless you intend to be teaching the pupils on NDA, corporate interests (and greed), undocumented hardware and reverse-engineering, of course! :-p