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iknow

@optonline.net
reply to DonLibes

Here's the law

Federal Court Rejects Nassau County, New York Homeowners Association¡¯s Attempt to Halt Wireless Deployment by NextG Networks
Court Agrees NextG Deployments of DAS Facilities Promote National Wireless Objectives in Support of the Federal Telecommunications Act
SAN JOSE, Calif. ¨C March 11, 2010 ¨C NextG Networks, Inc. announced today that a federal court in New York has dismissed a lawsuit against NextG Networks and other defendants, including the Town of Hempstead, New York in connection with its deployment of a distributed antenna system (DAS) in the community of Merrick within the Town of Hempstead. In rejecting the claims of the Merrick Gables Homeowners Association, the court recognized the overriding public policy promoting the deployment of broadband, competitive wireless networks such as NextG¡¯s DAS networks, which enable wireless carriers to add greater coverage and capacity to their networks.
The residents¡¯ lawsuit (Merrick Gables Association, Inc. et al. vs. Town of Hempstead et al., Case 09©\CV©\4415, U.S. District Court, Eastern District N.Y. (Mar. 10, 2010) MORE HERE. »www.nextgnetworks.net/nextg/libr···1110.pdf these are actually protected by federal law and policy.



John Galt
Forward, March
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Happy Camp
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That pretty much sums it up...



Jack_in_VA
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reply to iknow

quote:
the court recognized the overriding public policy promoting the deployment of broadband, competitive wireless networks such as NextG¡¯s DAS networks, which enable wireless carriers to add greater coverage and capacity to their networks.
That is what people have to understand. If you want a service then you have to allow the infrastructure to provide it. The court was right.


49528867
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Fort Lauderdale, FL
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said by Jack_in_VA:

That is what people have to understand. If you want a service then you have to allow the infrastructure to provide it. The court was right.

Which is exactly why “Smart Meters” and the AMI/AMR infrastructure should be exempted from any “local” regulations as well, it is the same theory you just mentioned, if you want it delivered, this is how you are going to get it delivered.

Wayne
--
"It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." - Charles A. Beard


Jack_in_VA
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said by 49528867:

said by Jack_in_VA:

That is what people have to understand. If you want a service then you have to allow the infrastructure to provide it. The court was right.

Which is exactly why “Smart Meters” and the AMI/AMR infrastructure should be exempted from any “local” regulations as well, it is the same theory you just mentioned, if you want it delivered, this is how you are going to get it delivered.

Wayne

It doesn't take a "smart meter" to deliver electricity, water or gas to my home as wireless cell and data services require antennas placed in strategic places to provide effective coverage . Big difference.

It's up to the customers if they possibly want to pay more instead of allowing the intrusion of their hourly or minute activity. All they need to know is the total used in the billing period. Nothing more. Utilities exist only to serve the needs of their customers not the utilities being the masters of the customers.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
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Onion, NJ
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private utilities are beholden to their shareholders, nothing more or less.



Jack_in_VA
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said by AVD:

private utilities are beholden to their shareholders, nothing more or less.

"As any public company is". Nothing more, nothing less and to expect anything other is foolish.

I guess must states are the same as Virginia. The state will guarantee the utility makes a certain amount of profit and will allow rates that allow them do it.


49528867
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Fort Lauderdale, FL
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reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

It doesn't take a "smart meter" to deliver electricity, water or gas to my home as wireless cell and data services require antennas placed in strategic places to provide effective coverage . Big difference.

Sorry no difference, as part of an overall transmission and distribution interface Smart Meters are just as critical as Micro-Cells or DAS.

Wayne
--
"It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." - Charles A. Beard


Jack_in_VA
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·Millenicom

said by 49528867:

said by Jack_in_VA:

It doesn't take a "smart meter" to deliver electricity, water or gas to my home as wireless cell and data services require antennas placed in strategic places to provide effective coverage . Big difference.

Sorry no difference, as part of an overall transmission and distribution interface Smart Meters are just as critical as Micro-Cells or DAS.

Wayne

Nope you're wrong but you would never admit to it.

Wireless has to be close to the user for the service to work. Electricity, water, gas, air, can be delivered without any meter at all. All that would be needed is a fixed amount to enable the utility to make a profit for the shareholders. Nothing more.


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD

I think I agree with Wayne on this one. The realtime data that utilities gather from their smartmeter deployments will allow them to increase power quality by focusing repair efforts more effectively. From "dying gasp" messages sent at the beginning of an outage to data on momentary dropouts, this will be a big asset for them. I'd say it's about on par with the DAS discussed here.

BGE will be replacing my old mechanical meter in the next few months. Just got the letter in the mail this week.



Jack_in_VA
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North, VA
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·Millenicom

said by PSWired:

I think I agree with Wayne on this one. The realtime data that utilities gather from their smartmeter deployments will allow them to increase power quality by focusing repair efforts more effectively. From "dying gasp" messages sent at the beginning of an outage to data on momentary dropouts, this will be a big asset for them. I'd say it's about on par with the DAS discussed here.

BGE will be replacing my old mechanical meter in the next few months. Just got the letter in the mail this week.

Our POCO has a very effective phone outage notification system. They don't need to spend the millions required to replace the meters they just replaced a few years ago to allow remote reading.

As with anything there can be many justifications thrown in to mask the true intent which IMO is not notification of an outage.


49528867
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reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

Electricity, water, gas, air, can be delivered without any meter at all.

While it can be done without a meter, it is neither practical nor wise to try and do so, the meter or more specifically, a smart meter provides end point data which with each passing day becomes more valuable to a power utility, without such data capacity managers and planners are really in the dark as to what is coming their way until it actually hits them.

As it is now power utilities are in a quandary as to how to manage connecting electric vehicles to their grid, they know for example it will only take a few vehicles per transformer to overload residential distribution and without the deployment of smart meters to shift those loads later into the evening when overall consumption is reduced, the alternative being monitoring overload induced outages to drive feeder and transformer upgrades, the cost of which would be burdened by all the ratepayers not those driving the need for the upgrades.

As such the need for the smart meter is quite real, and the day will come when the DOE will step in and overrule the local authorities who are carving out exemptions to the deployment of those meters much in the same manner to which the FCC has overruled local zoning boards over the deployment of communications facilities.

Wayne
--
"It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." - Charles A. Beard


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
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reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

Our POCO has a very effective phone outage notification system. They don't need to spend the millions required to replace the meters they just replaced a few years ago to allow remote reading.

As with anything there can be many justifications thrown in to mask the true intent which IMO is not notification of an outage.

When I'm not home I can't call if power is out. Meanwhile my fridge is getting warmer.

I like that they know when power is out.


Jack_in_VA
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Reviews:
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3 edits

said by fifty nine:

said by Jack_in_VA:

Our POCO has a very effective phone outage notification system. They don't need to spend the millions required to replace the meters they just replaced a few years ago to allow remote reading.

As with anything there can be many justifications thrown in to mask the true intent which IMO is not notification of an outage.

When I'm not home I can't call if power is out. Meanwhile my fridge is getting warmer.

I like that they know when power is out.

How many times does that happen? I've been here since 1989 and had many power failures and only lost food one time and that was after Isabel when the power was out 17 days and no meter smart or not would have made any difference one way or the other . Besides I have insurance to cover a "REAL" loss. You're grasping at straws. Your opinion is your opinion only and is subject to review by others.


Terri

@verizon.net
reply to Jack_in_VA

What about the right of a purely residential community to decide if they want a DAS or not, after all it serves such a small area the people of that area should have the right to want them there or not. Why can't the residents be part of the approval process? 20ft. from children's bedrooms and a 60 ft. pole in your front yard (2 feet away from your property line) seems extreme. Who will pay if no one wants to buy this house? Real Estate prices will go down 5-10% according to my realtor and the house will take longer to sell. Also, if your family develops leukemia or other cancers how can you prove it was from the antenna? can you prove which cigarette will give you lung cancer? This is a for profit company that is making billions of dollars.

There are no studies on cumulative long term exposures, there are not even guidelines by FCC on long -term exposures. How can the FCC expose us for 10-20 years our however you live in your house 24/7 without looking at this more thoroughly ?



Jack_in_VA
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Tin Hats on sale at Walmart and Target.

There is no evidence that any cancers are caused by this emf.

Using your logic the company should be able to decide to not provide service to the small purely residential community that doesn't want the towers.

quote:
There are no studies on cumulative long term exposures, there are not even guidelines by FCC on long -term exposures. How can the FCC expose us for 10-20 years our however you live in your house 24/7 without looking at this more thoroughly ?
Not factual at all.


whizkid3
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Queens, NY
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1 recommendation

said by Jack_in_VA:

quote:
There are no studies on cumulative long term exposures, there are not even guidelines by FCC on long -term exposures. How can the FCC expose us for 10-20 years our however you live in your house 24/7 without looking at this more thoroughly ?
Not factual at all.

Agreed, 100%. There are a myriad of studies of long-term exposure to radio-waves of all frequencies and strengths. One merely has to go back to the first page in this thread to see links I posted to World Health Organization and International Agency for Research on Cancer conclusions on such studies:
»Re: how close can a cell tower be to a house?

Panic, superstition and repeating old-wives tales seems to take hold with anything that is invisible and not easily understood by those who had little interest or education in science. (Like sitting too close to the television; or the hideous dangers of radiation from microwave ovens.) Simply mention the word 'radiation' and it conjures up images of horrible burns and cancers from Hiroshima. The two types of 'radiation'; ionizing (Nuclear bombs, x-rays, gamma rays) and non-ionizing (radio-waves) have little to nothing to do with each other.

Terri, your kids have much more chance of getting cancer from the ionizing radiation of the sun; then they do from a tiny radio transmitter on the side of your house. If you are so concerned and misinformed, please start dressing them in burka's and sunglasses. This way they will be only slightly safer from getting cancer (from the sun). The fact is, they are exposed to the very same electro-magnetic waves coming from the hidden wiring in your home's walls; and the endless radio-waves that have existed all around us since the big-bang. They have much more a chance of getting cancer from the ionizing radiation given off by the concrete streets they walk on and the bricks in your house, than they do from a wireless meter.


toby
Troy Mcclure

join:2001-11-13
Seattle, WA
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by fifty nine:

said by Jack_in_VA:

Our POCO has a very effective phone outage notification system. They don't need to spend the millions required to replace the meters they just replaced a few years ago to allow remote reading.

As with anything there can be many justifications thrown in to mask the true intent which IMO is not notification of an outage.

When I'm not home I can't call if power is out. Meanwhile my fridge is getting warmer.

I like that they know when power is out.

How many times does that happen? I've been here since 1989 and had many power failures and only lost food one time and that was after Isabel when the power was out 17 days and no meter smart or not would have made any difference one way or the other . Besides I have insurance to cover a "REAL" loss. You're grasping at straws. Your opinion is your opinion only and is subject to review by others.

Others like myself have several power outages per year due the weather or due to people running their trucks into power poles.

We do have a smart meter, but all our power is underground for several miles, so the power company only gets the power readings when they drive up our roads with their antenna pointing at houses or cabins in the forests.

When the power is out for more than a few hours, our CenturyLink phones no longer work. We have no phone service, we have no cell service, we have no power.

So if these meters help us in the surrounding areas to get power back quicker, then its ok by us.

A claim on insurance makes the premium go up, or at least stops it going down.


Jack_in_VA
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Reviews:
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said by toby:

Others like myself have several power outages per year due the weather or due to people running their trucks into power poles.

We do have a smart meter, but all our power is underground for several miles, so the power company only gets the power readings when they drive up our roads with their antenna pointing at houses or cabins in the forests.

When the power is out for more than a few hours, our CenturyLink phones no longer work. We have no phone service, we have no cell service, we have no power.

So if these meters help us in the surrounding areas to get power back quicker, then its ok by us.

A claim on insurance makes the premium go up, or at least stops it going down.

quote:
When the power is out for more than a few hours, our CenturyLink phones no longer work. We have no phone service, we have no cell service, we have no power.
Here our Verizon POTS continues to work and our Verizon Cell phones continue to work as the tower has a "Big" generator. We have never been without phone service even after Isabel when the power was out 17 days.

I don't recall ever having a problem reporting an outage so the smart meter argument is just a smoke screen for the real reason to deploy them.

After having a claim then for lost food the adjuster said that events like that (Power failures) due to weather have no effect on individual rates going up.


AVD
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Onion, NJ
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said by Jack_in_VA:

Here our Verizon POTS continues to work and our Verizon Cell phones continue to work as the tower has a "Big" generator.

Its not the size of the generator, its the size of the fuel tank.
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Jack_in_VA
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said by AVD:

said by Jack_in_VA:

Here our Verizon POTS continues to work and our Verizon Cell phones continue to work as the tower has a "Big" generator.

Its not the size of the generator, its the size of the fuel tank.

Very true but they managed to keep it going for 17 days. However the generators they put on their POTS electronic switches kept being stolen almost as fast as they put them on.


49528867
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Fort Lauderdale, FL
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1 edit

said by Jack_in_VA:

Very true but they managed to keep it going for 17 days. However the generators they put on their POTS electronic switches kept being stolen almost as fast as they put them on.

That’s bullshit, switches in a central office or MTSO have their own on-site generators.

As to the field where remote terminals or sites are powered by generators that are tied down and booted.

Wayne
--
"It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." - Charles A. Beard


Jack_in_VA
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Are you saying i'm lying? Ok mods this is a flame. I don't know what your problem is Wayne but you have one.

You weren't here and I was very much without POTS many times due to batteries running down because generator at the switch 2-1/2 miles from me was stolen. They cut the chains to get them.