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BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to chgo_man99

Re: future t mobile customer former att

They should work to get rates down, and how is there not competition? All four carriers do global roaming, and yet none of them have worked to get rates out of the stratosphere. There is no technical reason that international roaming should cost much of anything, yet it is absolutely insane.

Part of the issue is a regulatory body, but even the EU is weak in this regard. They set the limit at $1/MB, which is still totally insane. I think they should have set it at $.05/MB (ignoring $-Euro exchange, since when you're talking about such large numbers, it's almost irrelevant).

Maybe some MVNO should come along and do it, and do it right, and cater to that user base, and force the real carriers to get with the program.

It's interesting that Apple allowed them to do that. Apple seems to be losing it's backbone. It seems the equivalent to the $30 price point with no contract is what they are doing.

That's a very interesting article, I saw something recently about how US companies are losing $6bn of revenue on international roaming because it is so insanely expensive that most people don't use it.

I'm surprised this type of thing hasn't been addressed either by the FCC or by state AGs, since it can create serious bill shock situations. I'd like to see it be the law that they can't charge more than 5x the rate that they do in the US, so it would be $.05/MB or $50/GB for international, etc. It's a little harder with text, since it's unlimited, so it's really hard to figure out what the cost of a text actually is.

What is also interesting is that AT&T got rid of it's $65/mo unlimited international data plan, and now they have no caps on overages.

Overages, should in general, be capped at 150% of the base monthly rate. AOL did it back in the day, if you were on the hourly plan, they'd stop charging around the $37 mark, since it was 1.5x unlimited. The same should be true, by law, for the wireless providers, since they have not been honest in self-regulation in this area. So international data overages would be capped at $100, domestic voice minutes under $150, and domestic text overages at $30/line or $45/plan. The very idea that Verizon had the audacity to send someone a $10,000 bill for text overages is just insane and despicable.


chgo_man99

join:2010-01-01
San Jose, CA

Did u ready my previous article? it states theory why international roaming is insanely expensive. One of the reasons being u don't know on whom you roamed when you come back, usually no choice to who roam on, no regulation at all between countries, and fact that they make more on cashing users mistakes than probably the plan you proposed. Will this ever change? I dunno. Voice domestic roaming changed in the US but it was within US boundaries and because people move and use mobile frequently outside home.

As for international roaming, its interesting that Canadians have little bit more generous roaming voice/text plans to the US, including unlimited texting than what we Americans have. We pay the same rate for texting whether we talk or travel to Canada, Mexico or Europe.

If you check rates for Wind mobile in Canada, they have unlimited US texting and calling for $10. They also have for $8 unlimited texting to the world.

Their US or global roaming rates for data are still insanely expensive though and even at worse deal than what at&t offers. For instance the best u can get with Wind is $0.5/Mb. Its same under at&t global add-on $25 for 50Mb. When you go higher it drops to 0.25/Mb.

Its interesting international authorities (especially US) have more time to bust petty criminals on marijuana on which no one ever dies from overdose. But they totally overlook $100,000 bills travel citizens when returning to the U.S.


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH

Yes, I read it. The customer shouldn't have to control what roaming partner they are on. It should all be handled by the carrier, but not at stratospheric rates.

The thing is, once people realize how expensive they are, they won't use them. That's not good for carrier revenue. If they offered reasonable rates, or a plan that was more money for home rate use abroad, that would be a legitimate, sustainable revenue stream.

All it takes is one company to break the status quo. Maybe a company like T-Mobile will want to do it to differentiate themselves from Verizon and AT&T, and that will break the logjam. My suspicion is that it will come with a plan that's $10-$20/mo more than the regular plan with a 2-year contract, but either have very low international rates or international extended home type of service. It would be a great way to boost ARPU, and very low risk/cost if the roaming agreements are set up the right way.

We can get a Canada plan on AT&T that covers voice and text, but it doesn't cover data. Canada should just be regular roaming, the US and Canada are even on the same phone system.

Interestingly enough, Sprint MVNO Ting is $.15/min and $.50/MB when in Canada, which while still outrageous, is at least out of the stratosphere. I don't know if they are operating through a Sprint roaming agreement, or if they have their own. It's a little difference, since they are CDMA, and run on CDMA up there. Texting is also free in Canada for them, so that would be a way to avoid costs.

Technically speaking, there is no reason why there should even be the concept of international roaming. Certain places, like Barrow, AK, or islands in the pacific that have no land-based connectivity would just have an extra charge on them. Everything should be one, flat rate to call or text anywhere. Why is it that I can pull gigabytes of data from Australia for free, yet AT&T can't manage to do free roaming in Europe?

Don't even get me going on Cruise ships, they are insane too. At least in that environment, you don't really need data, so you can just put the phone in airplane mode, use your GMRS radios, and be all set.