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DJboutit

join:2009-12-10
Houston, TX

Comcast to start Monitoring ISPs July 1

Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, Time Warner Cable and other Internet service providers in the United States will soon launch new programs to police their networks in an effort to catch digital pirates and stop illegal file-sharing. Major ISPs announced last summer that they had agreed to take new measures in an effort to prevent subscribers from illegally downloading copyrighted material, but the specifics surrounding the imminent antipiracy measures were not made available. Now, RIAA chief executive Cary Sherman has said that ISPs are ready to begin their efforts to curtail illegal movie, music and software downloads on July 12th. Read on for more.

“Each ISP has to develop their infrastructure for automating the system,” Sherman said during a talk at the annual Association of American Publishers meeting, according to CNET. Measures will also be taken to establish databases “so they can keep track of repeat infringers, so they know that this is the first notice or the third notice. Every ISP has to do it differently depending on the architecture of its particular network. Some are nearing completion and others are a little further from completion.”

Customers found to be illegally downloading copyrighted material will first receive one or two notifications from their ISPs, essentially stating that they have been caught. If the illegal downloads continue, subscribers will receive a new notice requesting acknowledgement that the notice has been received. Subsequent offenses can then result in bandwidth throttling and even service suspension.

The news comes shortly after the closure of file-sharing giant Megaupload and increased pressure on other networks thought to be major hubs for the illegal distribution of copyrighted materials. Some studies show that these measures have had no impact on piracy, however, so organizations like the RIAA have been lobbying for ISPs to intervene and develop systems that will allow them to police their networks and directly address subscribers who illegally download copyrighted content.

Damn this is not good at all here In Houston Tx Comcast & AT&T are my only 2 choices for high speed internet and both are gonna start monitoring ISPs lame



bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA

VPN


shades

join:2001-06-26
Williamstown, NJ

1 recommendation

reply to DJboutit

comcast is not going to monitor the network for file sharers, it is going to be the same as it always has been, the media companies find someone sharing and they report it to the ISP, the only difference now is you get warning letters from the ISP more often and may get throttled for a bit



fuziwuzi
Not born yesterday
Premium
join:2005-07-01
Atlanta, GA

1 edit
reply to DJboutit

Use a high quality VPN service and turn your ISP into the dumb pipe it is supposed to be anyway.
--
Teabaggers: Destroying America is Priority #1

Expand your moderator at work


dslcreature
Premium
join:2010-07-10
Seattle, WA
reply to shades

Re: Comcast to start Monitoring ISPs July 1

said by shades:

comcast is not going to monitor the network for file sharers, it is going to be the same as it always has been, the media companies find someone sharing and they report it to the ISP, the only difference now is you get warning letters from the ISP more often and may get throttled for a bit

Until they get sued

nysports4evr
Premium
join:2010-01-23
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to shades

said by shades:

comcast is not going to monitor the network for file sharers, it is going to be the same as it always has been, the media companies find someone sharing and they report it to the ISP, the only difference now is you get warning letters from the ISP more often and may get throttled for a bit

People don't seem to understand this. They are not monitoring your access any more than they have been... there is just a new system being put in place to deal with the "warnings" they receive from third parties, they DO NOT monitor their own network.


scooby
Premium
join:2001-05-01
Schaumburg, IL
kudos:1
reply to dslcreature

Encryption for the win?



JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

thank goodness for private torrents



Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1

2 recommendations

Only speaking for myself, but to me the best way around all this is just don't download or steal any material that has a copyright.
Never have to worry about getting a call or nasty e-mail.



anonymust

@comcast.net

copyright must be abolished. copyright is an information monopoly that harms society. information cannot be owned or stolen.

copyright is the author's exclusive right to copy or distribute an original expression of ideas. any text, sound, image or video that exists on the internet or elsewhere is automatically copyrighted.

everytime you access the internet you are infringing copyright if you do not have the author's permission to copy or distribute.

the punishment for copyright infringement is extremely severe. if the copyrighted work is registered in the u.s. government copyright database the author can sue for $150,000 and legal costs for each act of copyright infringement. no proof of financial loss or harm is necessary.


AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL

said by anonymust :

copyright must be abolished. copyright is an information monopoly that harms society. information cannot be owned or stolen.

A bit extreme, especially considering we're talking about movies and tv shows, no?

said by anonymust :

everytime you access the internet you are infringing copyright if you do not have the author's permission to copy or distribute.

Not if the site has permission to distribute. A book, which is copyrighted, can be read by you or any number of individuals.


anonymust

@comcast.net

the regulation of any information exchange is totally unacceptable.


JPnATL

join:2011-11-16
Bethlehem, GA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to DJboutit

I think its great because the only people who may have a problem with it are doing something they should not be.Maybe they can stop some of the online underage garbage that goes on as well.Why do u say its not good there in Houston and that u only have 2 choices because as long as you are doing what your suppose to be doing instead of what you listed u have nothing to worry about and if you are doing those things I hope your the first one they get.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
San Jose, CA
reply to Wayne99021

said by Wayne99021:

Only speaking for myself, but to me the best way around all this is just don't download or steal any material that has a copyright.
Never have to worry about getting a call or nasty e-mail.

Yep... "don't steal stuff" - seems simple enough.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Camaro
Question everything
Premium
join:2008-04-05
Westfield, MA
kudos:1
reply to DJboutit

And I am going out on a limb here but I think WiFi cracking is going to increase with this.


sabretooth

join:2012-02-14
Marietta, GA

I'll be a great defense, "Your honor, I was hacked"



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:5

An article on the Digital Trends site today about all this:

Six strikes and you're screwed: What the upcoming piracy crackdown means for you
Digital Trends - March 29, 2012
»news.yahoo.com/six-strikes-youre···247.html

"How does it work, in a nutshell?

Anytime copyright holders find that their content is being illegally downloaded, they will contact the participating ISPs. The ISPs will then send out an initial “copyright alert” to accounts linked to the alleged infringement. If a subscriber’s account continues to be linked to infringement, his or her ISP will send out up to four written notices, the natures of which are sometimes vague and varying. If the alleged infringement continues still, the ISP will then take “mitigation measures,” which include bandwidth throttling (i.e. slowing down the accused subscriber’s connection), or even temporarily cutting off full Web browsing abilities. In cases where alleged infringement persists after the initial mitigation measure, the subscriber may face lawsuits from the copyright holder, and/or have their Internet access cut entirely, in accordance with section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DCMA) (»www.copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf).

Who is in charge of this system?

Administering “six strikes” is a new entity called the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), which was established by the entertainment industry and the ISP industry. (Internet users were not part of the negotiations.) The CCI will be governed by a six-person executive committee, made up of three representatives of the copyright industry, and three representatives of participating Internet service providers. There will also be a three-person advisory board, made up of people “from relevant subject matter and consumer interest communities,” who represent us, the Internet users, in all this. Though, from the looks of it, the advisory committee appears to be mostly ornamental.

The CCI develops the “educational material” part of the alerts, and develops a set of “best practices” for the copyright alerts system to abide by. According to the CCI’s FAQs (»www.copyrightinformation.org/faq), the CCI will also “benefit from guidance by consumer advocates and technical experts serving on its advisory committee or providing other expert services,” whatever that means.

Which ISPs are part of this plan?

The big ones. Those currently on board include AT&T, Cablevison, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon. Smaller, local ISPs are not yet included in the plan. But more may climb aboard by the time the plan sets sail this summer.

What are these alerts?

Officially, the plan contains six levels of “copyright alerts,” and the consequences at each depth intensify. They are as follows:

First alert: An ISP will send a written alert (probably via email), which informs the subscriber that his/her account has been linked to infringing activities. This alert will also direct the subscriber to “educational resources” which will “(i) help him/her to check the security of his/her computer and any Wifi network, (ii) provide explanatory steps which will help to avoid content theft in the future and (iii) provide information about the abundant sources of lawful music, film and TV content,” according to the CCI. Of course, all of these “educational resources” are provided by the entertainment industry and their ISP cohorts, so you can guess what kind of advice these one-sided resources provide.

Second alert: This alert nearly mimics the first, but will “underscore the educational messages.” Also, ISPs may choose to simply skip this alert, and jump to option number three.

Third alert: At this level, things get creepy. Once an account is linked to infringing behavior a third time, the ISP will issue the alert through a “conspicuous mechanism,” like a pop-up window or landing screen, when the user goes online. The user must then explicitly acknowledge that he/she has seen the alert, which reminds that “content theft” is taking place through his/her account, and re-informs him/her the consequences of illegally downloading copyrighted content.

Fourth alert: The fourth alert is essentially identical to the third alert.

Fifth alert: Now the “mitigation measures” begin. In addition to sending an alert (probably the same alert as the third and fourth alerts), the ISP can choose to a) reduce Internet connection speeds (i.e. throttling); b) impose a landing page, which the accused subscriber cannot bypass until he/she contacts the ISP “to discuss the matter” — or reviews and responds to more of that enlightening “educational material.” According to the agreement, the ISPs have some freedom to choose which mitigation measures to take at this point in the alert process. And these measures may include some that are not listed here.

Sixth alert: At this point, the ISP may issue another mitigation measure. But the company could, legally, suspend the customer’s account altogether — though that is not an official part of the plan. Also, the subscriber could be sued by the copyright holders under DCMA. That said, the specific consequences at this stage remain dangerously unclear. (We’re putting our money on lawsuits.) The CCI does not expect many subscribers to reach this level of alert."



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:5

An article yesterday evening on the Venture Beat site:

Media companies & ISPs outline plan to stop piracy
Venture Beat - April 2, 2012
»venturebeat.com/2012/04/02/pirac···esponse/

"Another cog has fallen into place for the music and movie industries’ plan to transform major internet service providers into a copyright violation task force.

Today ISPs and media companies announced new plans for the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), a joint organization set up to curb illegal downloading and streaming of copyrighted content. Former lobbyist head Jill Lesser was named the organization’s executive director. The CCI’s six main directors all have ties to either ISPs or entertainment companies, but it’s advisory board does feature several tech/privacy advocates, including Public Knowledge CEO Gigi Sohn, iKeepSafe.org President Marsali Hancock, Internet Education Foundation Chairman Jerry Berman, and others.

Both the Recording Industry Association of America and Motion Picture Association of America met with several ISPs last July to discuss voluntary policies to discourage internet subscribers from illegally downloading music, movies, video games, and other software. The ISPs participating in the anti-piracy measures — Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon FiOS, Time Warner Cable, and others — should be ready to implement the new policies by this summer. Those policies include having each ISP set up its own method of tracking subscribers’ internet activity as well as setting up the CCI.

The CCI will support a new anti-piracy initiative called “graduated response”, which allows media companies to contact ISPs about users suspected of piracy and allows ISPs to subsequently send notices to educate those users about the consequences of copyright infringement. Users who are repeatedly notified can face suspension of their Internet service, bandwidth throttling, and “other measures that the ISP may deem necessary to help resolve the matter,” according to the CCI. Anyone who feels they have wrongly been accused of piracy can appeal by requesting an independent review of their internet activity, which costs a cool $35.

In regards to the graduated response initiative, Lesser said she plans to focus on “education and deterrence, not punishment.” That’s somewhat comforting, but ultimately we’ll have to see how the group operates once everything is set in motion this summer."



ichibeer

join:2005-12-06
Seattle, WA
reply to DJboutit

The Internet has no centralized governance in either technological implementation or policies for access and usage; each constituent network sets its own standards. Only the overreaching definitions of the two principal name spaces in the Internet, the Internet Protocol address space and the Domain Name System, are directed by a maintainer organization, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). The technical underpinning and standardization of the core protocols (IPv4 and IPv6) is an activity of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), a non-profit organization of loosely affiliated international participants that anyone may associate with by contributing technical expertise.

So, start your own TCP/IP network = IP gateway:)
Ask Comcast for a Business Class Service with your own static IP and gateway services to Internet. And then tell'em, "just forward my TCP/IP traffic and stfo away from my TCP/IP network" - hehe
--
#-------------------------
Plan for the future.
Live for Today.
Play Now!
------------------------#


neil0311

join:2005-07-24
Marietta, GA

1 recommendation

reply to DJboutit

said by DJboutit:

Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, Time Warner Cable and other Internet service providers in the United States will soon launch new programs to police their networks in an effort to catch digital pirates and stop illegal file-sharing. Major ISPs announced last summer that they had agreed to take new measures in an effort to prevent subscribers from illegally downloading copyrighted material, but the specifics surrounding the imminent antipiracy measures were not made available. Now, RIAA chief executive Cary Sherman has said that ISPs are ready to begin their efforts to curtail illegal movie, music and software downloads on July 12th. Read on for more.

Good. As someone who makes my living from software development, I think it's disgusting to read the comments from many of you who think it's OK to steal the hard work of others.

Piracy is wrong, illegal, and is no different than walking into a liquor store with a gun and taking the cash from the register.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
San Jose, CA
reply to sabretooth

said by sabretooth:

I'll be a great defense, "Your honor, I was hacked"

Not a defense, sadly. If you choose to add wifi, you are responsible for what happens. The cat downloaded kiddy porn defense also fails, unless you can prove your cat did it, or that you were hacked exactly when the infringement happened. Besides, there is no court, or honor here. Just no internet for you for a year.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


ichibeer

join:2005-12-06
Seattle, WA

3 edits
reply to neil0311

TCP/IP global data networks and Internet service were not developed or designed to be a secure commercial network of web boutiques or supermarkets for peddlers of goods or services. Internet is based on Open Source protocols, services and tools. But, if you wish to carry on with commercial activities and services on Internet, it is up to you and your lawyers to deal with security and copyrights issues. Anyone can build and OWN private and secure commercial network(s), over private data communication channels to promote and sell to others on the network(s), which are not part of Internet!
AOL tried that initially, the private data network concept with no or minimal Internet access. Where are they now? Who cares

I'd like to dare Comcast, Verizon or AT&T to turn into private and secured network providers with their own data protocols, standards, custom equipment, content and then ridiculous rules or agreements regarding Internet access. Wonder how long they would last as a profitable multimedia or data access companies.

#-------------------------
Plan for the future.
Live for Today.
Play Now!
------------------------#



scooby
Premium
join:2001-05-01
Schaumburg, IL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
reply to neil0311

said by neil0311:

Good. As someone who makes my living from software development, I think it's disgusting to read the comments from many of you who think it's OK to steal the hard work of others.

Piracy is wrong, illegal, and is no different than walking into a liquor store with a gun and taking the cash from the register.

While I agree that piracy is wrong (I work at a software development firm), your analogy is incorrect. Its hard to describe since pirates are not stealing something physical.

The first software firm I worked at did not have a product under $50k. We found that most people who pirated our products would have never bought it anyway. Does that make piracy acceptable? Hell no, but it did mean that piracy was not costing us money.

»www.aaideas.com/wp-content/uploa···eft3.jpg


nerdburg
Premium
join:2009-08-20
Schuylkill Haven, PA
kudos:1
reply to neil0311

said by neil0311:

Piracy is wrong, illegal, and is no different than walking into a liquor store with a gun and taking the cash from the register.

I'm no lawyer, but I'm pretty sure there is a difference between armed robbery a downloading the latest episode of a TV show. I suppose there would be more armed robberies tho if the only consequence was a strongly worded letter.


fuziwuzi
Not born yesterday
Premium
join:2005-07-01
Atlanta, GA
reply to DJboutit

I don't steal anything, but I'm giving some good money to a VPN provider because I do not trust my ISP and I certainly do not trust the MPAA/RIAA with even my initials, much less the knowledge of what I do or don't do on the internet. It is none of their damn business. Demanding privacy does not equate to doing something illegal.
--
Teabaggers: Destroying America is Priority #1



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:5
reply to DJboutit

Well, if anyone is currently experiencing a copyright infringement issue, and you're located in northern Florida, you might want to check out this post of mine in another copyright infringement thread: » two Comcast copyrights infringement letters


Chubbysumo

join:2009-12-01
Superior, WI
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by Wayne99021:

Only speaking for myself, but to me the best way around all this is just don't download or steal any material that has a copyright.
Never have to worry about getting a call or nasty e-mail.

Yep... "don't steal stuff" - seems simple enough.

stealing implies that the original owner has lost something, but in the case of filesharing, you are not making it so that the owner cannot hold it anymore. Its getting harder and harder to simply say that copyright infringement is stealing, and that they lost vast sums of monies, when in actuality, the copy may not have been a sale, and at most, they lost a few bucks, not thousands. Copyright laws need a refresh, in the right way, to allow digital goods to flourish in an age where everything can be found for free. hell, if the companies gave us a legal alternative that didnt suck, i would probably use it. Look at what Steam did to game piracy and prices. So far, the MPAA and RIAA, and copyright trolls are more concerned about making money from litigation versus the actual act of the infringement, and what possible damage it has to their business. Again, look up the definition of stealing, and you will see that there is no "copy" in theft. File sharing is NOT theft, and never was.


berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to DJboutit

I consume Open Source Software and I recognize the development of this product entails the labor of individuals, no less deserving of compensation than my labor as a general contractor. I do make monetary compensation, which is voluntary, at this stage of OSS in the commercial market. In consideration of reducing the financial burden to the producers of such software, I might choose to download it with a file sharing program, such as aria2c, using torrent files. I am concerned that this attempt by the entertainment industry to control intellectual property might not be intelligent enough to separate out the legal distribution of free software.

My girlfriend's sister has an iPad and asked me to help her put copies of the children's movies she paid this industry for to get them on dvd. Another thing that concerns me is how this industry feels entitled to prohibit their customers from using copies of their product on the customers' devices of choice.

Although Sony, Hollywood, et al claim to have the interests of the artists in mind, I don't think they care about anything but their own financial gain without bound.
Music FAILS: Occupy the Music Industry

Posted: 07 Mar 2012 01:06 PM PST




From Lester Chambers, the former lead singer for 60s soul group The Chambers Brothers, who posted this to his Facebook wall.

BRB, going to go pirate music.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
San Jose, CA
reply to Chubbysumo

said by Chubbysumo:

said by JohnInSJ:

said by Wayne99021:

Only speaking for myself, but to me the best way around all this is just don't download or steal any material that has a copyright.
Never have to worry about getting a call or nasty e-mail.

Yep... "don't steal stuff" - seems simple enough.

stealing implies that the original owner has lost something, but in the case of filesharing, you are not making it so that the owner cannot hold it anymore.

You know how silly that argument sounds, right?
--
My place : »www.schettino.us