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coxuser

@cox.net

MoCA POE Filter Questions

When using MoCA network adapters in the home is there any requirement from Cox to install a Point of Entry filter on the incoming line?

Can a neighbors MoCA network negatively impact others on the same tap if they are not using a POE filter?


AnonPhx

@cox.net
Cox only installs a POE filter for their customer's using Whole Home DVR, if you installed a MOCA network yourself Cox has no requirement to install the POE filter.

There is also no reason for Cox to keep your line active, should you choose to setup MOCA without a POE filter, since the resulting ingress would cause service issues for the area.


jchambers28

join:2007-05-12
Alma, AR
what is a POE filter?


AnonPhx

@cox.net
a Point of Entry filter prevents MOCA from back feeding into the cable plant.


coxuser

@cox.net
reply to AnonPhx
said by AnonPhx :

....if you installed a MOCA network yourself Cox has no requirement to install the POE filter.

There is also no reason for Cox to keep your line active, should you choose to setup MOCA without a POE filter, since the resulting ingress would cause service issues for the area.

I am confused by the statements above. So are you saying Cox does require a POE filter or Cox will, or may, terminate service, if the customer does not install one.

Am I allowed to open the Cox entry box and install one myself.

dn0

join:2005-07-05
USA
reply to coxuser
It is a bit confusing, but short answer is Yes you need the filter as it could and likely will back feed out onto the cable plant.
And you can usually get into the box outside, if there is a customer access side like there is on an Arris voice port and some splitter boxes.
Just be sure you re-tighten the filter and connectors with a 7/16 wrench, or you may end up attracting a tech chasing ingress down the line.

JoshuaCA

join:2011-04-06
Chula Vista, CA
reply to coxuser
Due to losses inside the home/drop system and port to port/port to feed isolation at the tap, its 'fairly' unlikely for a home MoCA setup to interfere with the cable plant. (Certainly possible on paper, have not seen/heard of it happeing IRL yet)

Of course, we'd rather not have stray signals running through the plant!

A POE filter is a good idea anyway, as the filter creates RF reflections that MoCA actually uses to increase throughput on the MoCA network.

The side of the house/MPOE is a good generic call on where to install. Idealy you would install it at the deepest common point inside the home where the MoCA equiptment is located.

 
                          |---------MoCA device 1
            |--------POE--|---------MoCA device 2
MPOE -----                  |-------- Non-MoCA  
            |------non MoCA
            |------non MoCA
 

Hoss
Sauters A Walrus

join:2000-10-05
Tulsa, OK
Right now, my filter is on the back of my EMTA. Earlier post tells you how my line architecture is right now. That will change Monday though. Not sure how they will handle that.

wifiSnowman

join:2011-11-23
Warwick, RI
reply to dn0
If you do not filter your in-house system, you will likely end up disconnected at the tap by a line tech tracking ingress. When the MoCA beacon reaches the cable plant, it is around +20dbmv which will make it through most cable taps, causing a nightmare of a situation. Best place to put it is on the input of your first splitter off the drop.

Hoss
Sauters A Walrus

join:2000-10-05
Tulsa, OK
said by wifiSnowman:

If you do not filter your in-house system, you will likely end up disconnected at the tap by a line tech tracking ingress. When the MoCA beacon reaches the cable plant, it is around +20dbmv which will make it through most cable taps, causing a nightmare of a situation. Best place to put it is on the input of your first splitter off the drop.

The way the tech explained it to me Monday, is that the WHDVR should be porting out one line per connection point..i.e., no splitters in the house. So the splits will come off the drop and filter themselves out to each of my four connection points so I will no longer have a splitter in house.

The tech also mentioned that as far as the WHDVR goes, the return signal is the most important (upstream) and the signal levels should resemble what the internet should have. He believes he'll be able to get me 49db on all the drops once he rewires the service. Currently, one client is right at 54, the host is at 52, the other client about 52 as well. My internet service upstream is about at 45 db upstream.

So in this instance, would the tech be better off putting the filter in the interface box outside before he does the 4-way split? As opposed to how it is now (inline to the EMTA)?

wifiSnowman

join:2011-11-23
Warwick, RI
If you have a whdvr the filter always goes at the POE (point of entry) aka your ground block. If you don't have whdvr, but have a MoCA enabled STB, then the filter goes at your MTA or Modem to prevent T3 and FEC issues.

ajwees41
Premium
join:2002-05-10
Omaha, NE
said by wifiSnowman:

If you have a whdvr the filter always goes at the POE (point of entry) aka your ground block. If you don't have whdvr, but have a MoCA enabled STB, then the filter goes at your MTA or Modem to prevent T3 and FEC issues.

were would the filter go for a moca network using tivo's? just one on the cable modem?

dn0

join:2005-07-05
USA
You should still have one at the ground block, or POE, and preferably one at your docsis modem. We discovered a couple years ago that the MOCA signal can cause modem issues, this by chance as Motorola started shipping new set tops with the MOCA already active and at full power out of the box. Techs were having strange problems when a modem would start acting up as soon as a new Moto box was installed.