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djcrazy
Premium
join:2009-08-05
Minneapolis, MN
Reviews:
·Comcast
·T-Mobile US

4 edits
reply to telcodad

Re: [Caps] What do you think Comcast should do now about its dat

I did not vote because there are a few I would agree with.

I think it should be like this:

Economy -- 100GB
Performance -- 250GB
Blast! -- 500GB
Extreme 50 -- 1TB
Extreme 105 -- 2TB

And any overages should be billed linear to the base service. In other words if I was on Blast and used 550 GB of data, the overage of 50 GB would be billed at 10% ( the 10% comes from being 10% over the stated cap.) of the base price for Blast. In this case Blast is $58.95 so the overage charge would be $5.89 (or $5.90 if you round up). I believe this would totally be fair with respect to the customer and the company as well.

Sure, we would all prefer the cap to be removed but let's be realistic here, that costs the company more to provide. With this scenario, the company is making at least as much per GB (actually slightly more since the basic costs of providing the service are already paid by the base rate). I believe this is totally reasonable.

Sure, one could still get a business account, but that usually requires a contract and more install fees. This idea is a way for users to get what they want and let the company , who needs to make a profit, to still make money, without the headaches of setting up a business account or risking disconnection or outrageous overage fees.

That's just slightly under 12 cents per GB of overage which I believe is totally reasonable here. I actually could see some executives at Comcast reading this and maybe even putting it up on the table for consideration.

There should be an optional account setting to enable this feature, and when disabled, the connection gets throttled back to 128 Kb without overage fees after crossing the threshold and continues until the start of the new month (or billing cycle, which would be preferred.). The metering scenario would be much better if it was measured throughout the billing cycle rather than calendar month IMHO.

Bitch all you want about the cap, but why should Comcast just drop it? It is unfair to have that as the only option and I can see why any talks with Comcast upper level management would fail. My suggestion here is a much better compromise as it's give and take and actually gives the provider something to consider.

As overall average usage per customer goes up, then they should consider adjusting the cap up as necessary.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

1 recommendation

reply to telcodad

They could uncap everything inside their network, leave the 250GB cap for anything arriving/leaving their network, since that's the new choke point post docsis3 (»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peering - is fair when traffic is roughly equal in both directions - which it isn't when the traffic is mostly one way - like Netflix.)

Then everyone would scream about net neutrality. Like with the xbox. Even though essentially content sources like Netflix are asking all comcast subs to subsidize the comcast users who also are netflix users, and stream more than 250GB of netflix a month.

Or, if you prefer, the backup providers like carbonite are asking grandma using 5 GB a month on email and the web to subsidize bob next door backing up 3TB of data a month.

Yeah, that sounds fair

Pure metered billing is the answer. Everyone pays for exactly what they use. We can see how much people LOVE that just by looking at AT&T Wireless.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

Right now, Comcast Business HSI is still unlimited. Does that IP traffic use the facilities and HSI QAMs that residential users in the same neighboring areas use?

Yep. And business users pay dramatically more for the same speeds, especially at the higher tiers.

And business users (like me) while not worrying about caps, often use less than the cap per month. My average over three years is under 200GB/mo, and I serve three websites and provide email for 10 users on my 12/2 account (along with "residential" type use for 3 people, including netflix streaming...)
--
My place : »www.schettino.us

GTFan

join:2004-12-03
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

Pure metered billing is the answer. Everyone pays for exactly what they use. We can see how much people LOVE that just by looking at AT&T Wireless.

No, the answer is actually mandated common carrier status and open access to all comers, with a Chinese wall between content delivery and infrastructure. So we can have a choice between providers and their use of caps, in other words.
But we both know this will never happen, so metered billing is our future! Gotta love the corporatocracy...


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to djcrazy

OK, rather than just "make up" the variable cap values for each tier, I decided to do some actual calculations to try and make them fair relative to each other.

I used the following logic:

Assuming that each tier gets to use their sustained downstream rate for the same amount of time each month, and that the current 250GB/mo. data cap is OK for the highest, current, Economy tier rate (3M/768K), I calculated that at a steady 375KB/s rate, you would reach 250GB in 8 days.

Figuring that there would also be some upstream data during that time, I decided to go with a figure of 7 days at the downstream rate, about 25% of the time each month, or an average of about 6 hours a day. That seemed reasonable to me.

Using the sustained, DOCSIS 3.0 rates listed in the DSLR's Comcast HSI FAQ »Comcast High Speed Internet FAQ »What are the actual Provisioned Speeds? (thanks Johkal!), I came up with the following tier caps:

Speed Tier -- Monthly Data Cap

Economy (3M/768K) -- 250GB

Performance (12/2) -- 1TB

Blast! (20/4) -- 1.75TB (round it up to 2TB for a nice number)

Extreme 50 (50/10) -- 4.5TB (5TB)

Extreme 105 (105/10or15) -- 9.5TB (10TB)

If you want to assume a different cap for the Economy tier, then the tier speed ratios are 1 / 4.4 / 7.33 / 18.33 / 38.66.

So, if the Economy tier is capped at only 100GB, as djcrazy suggested, the Performance tier cap could then be 400GB, Blast 700GB, Ex50 2TB and Ex105 4TB.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

said by telcodad:

Speed Tier -- Monthly Data Cap

Economy (3M/768K) -- 250GB

Performance (12/2) -- 1TB

Blast! (20/4) -- 1.75TB (round it up to 2TB for a nice number)

Extreme 50 (50/10) -- 4.5TB (5TB)

Extreme 105 (105/10or15) -- 9.5TB (10TB)

Those are fine, but you will need to scale WAY up the monthly fee for every tier that isn't 250GB. The non-linear premium for business class is +$10 to $15 for performance up to +$200 for Extreme 105

Those extra charges are in part to offset the added expense of the expected bandwidth consumption.

The current residential plans are not priced to reflect higher usage at the different tiers. If they were, they would look a lot like the business class prices.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

said by JohnInSJ:

Those are fine, but you will need to scale WAY up the monthly fee for every tier that isn't 250GB. The non-linear premium for business class is +$10 to $15 for performance up to +$200 for Extreme 105

Those extra charges are in part to offset the added expense of the expected bandwidth consumption.

The current residential plans are not priced to reflect higher usage at the different tiers. If they were, they would look a lot like the business class prices.

Wait, so you're saying that a residential Extreme 105 user, who is paying over 6X more a month than an Economy one, should not expect to be able to use alot more bandwidth/data?

Remember, when buying most items in quantity, the prices do not usually scale up linearly, but much slower rate (e.g., 1@$2, 3@$5, 10@$10, etc.).

So I don't see a problem understanding having a tier with a speed/cap that is 40X higher while "only" paying about 6X more.

That is just a merchant's way of encouraging customers to spend more, and reflects the lower differential cost in providing more to the same customer (i.e., a Taxi ride being like $5 for the first mile, $2 a mile after that).

If the issue is total network capacity, then I say to Comcast, don't offer/sell what you can't support!


espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

They could uncap everything inside their network, leave the 250GB cap for anything arriving/leaving their network, since that's the new choke point post docsis3

Even with DOCSIS 3 your building blocks are still 38mbps downstream channels and 27mbps upstream channels. Traffic entering or leaving the network can be built out using 10/40/100gbps links.

The chokepoint is still at the edge.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to telcodad

The speed tier charges are justifable as higher speeds mean less concurrent users per channel.
you are not paying more for additional bandwidth.
on business tiers part of the extra cost goes towards additional bandwidth part for additional support costs.
BTW Business tiers are a bargain right now (building market share?) I wouldn't be supprised to see their rates rise faster than residential in the near future.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

said by JohnInSJ:

Those are fine, but you will need to scale WAY up the monthly fee for every tier that isn't 250GB. The non-linear premium for business class is +$10 to $15 for performance up to +$200 for Extreme 105

Those extra charges are in part to offset the added expense of the expected bandwidth consumption.

The current residential plans are not priced to reflect higher usage at the different tiers. If they were, they would look a lot like the business class prices.

Wait, so you're saying that a residential Extreme 105 user, who is paying over 6X more a month than an Economy one, should not expect to be able to use alot more bandwidth/data?

Yes. I am saying the prices reflect the speed difference, not the size of the gas tank. A business class Extreme 105 user pays 3X a residential Extreme 105 user - why do you think that is so?
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to espaeth

said by espaeth:

said by JohnInSJ:

They could uncap everything inside their network, leave the 250GB cap for anything arriving/leaving their network, since that's the new choke point post docsis3

Even with DOCSIS 3 your building blocks are still 38mbps downstream channels and 27mbps upstream channels. Traffic entering or leaving the network can be built out using 10/40/100gbps links.

The chokepoint is still at the edge.

But comcast controls the costs there with congestion management. They can only control the peer usage lopsided relationship and flawed business models of content providers like Netflix via caps. Or usage based pricing.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by telcodad:

said by JohnInSJ:

Those are fine, but you will need to scale WAY up the monthly fee for every tier that isn't 250GB. The non-linear premium for business class is +$10 to $15 for performance up to +$200 for Extreme 105

Those extra charges are in part to offset the added expense of the expected bandwidth consumption.

The current residential plans are not priced to reflect higher usage at the different tiers. If they were, they would look a lot like the business class prices.

Wait, so you're saying that a residential Extreme 105 user, who is paying over 6X more a month than an Economy one, should not expect to be able to use alot more bandwidth/data?

Yes. I am saying the prices reflect the speed difference, not the size of the gas tank. A business class Extreme 105 user pays 3X a residential Extreme 105 user - why do you think that is so?

I thought Business Class HSI service was more expensive not only because it has no data cap, but because of its much better Quality of Service (QoS), with its separate dedicated support group (and different support telephone number) and much shorter response/repair times. That's why I would think "a business class Extreme 105 user would pay 3X what a residential Extreme 105 user does."

What I think you are trying to say is that speed is not the same as the total amount of data.

And that is true. As an electrical engineer, I know that power is not the same as energy.

But what you are saying Comcast is doing is kind of like paying the electric company more to upgrade your service from 100 Amps to 200 Amps (more power), in order to be able to run your new, more powerful, central A/C system, and then having them tell you that you still can't use any more Kilowatt-Hours (energy) than you did before.

So now you can only run that new central A/C system for only 12 hours each day. If you try to use it more, the electric company then calls you an "energy hog" and berates you for "degrading the service to all of your neighbors."

I would then say to them "but why did you offer/sell me 200 Amp service if you won't let me use it! Don't blame me if you haven't upgraded the generators and/or electric cables to now support it!

Having a higher-speed data link only invites more usage, as when you can do things faster you often do more of it.

That's what's happening right now with many iPad users who have upgraded to the "New iPad" with 4G LTE service. Since they can now web surf, etc. faster, they're doing more of it and running into their plan's data cap (which was never an issue for them before).


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

your car can likely far exceed the speed limit, why did they sell you one?
your 200 amp service implies a higher peak load, but the heating or cooling of your home still requires moving the same BTU for the same tempature change.

you can buy beef from $2 to $100 a pound, the higher price is taster and tender but a pound is still 16 ounces.

sending 70 pounds via parcel post takes longer than 70 pounds via Fedex overnight and is priced differently.

what other consumable would you expect to use more of without paying more for?

As I said before, ComCast sells a higher level of bandwidth marketed at a higher price as Business class for those that think they need more.

The iPad problem lies with some other provider, ComCast does some wi-fi but no LTE.



telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 edit

1 recommendation

said by tshirt:

your car can likely far exceed the speed limit, why did they sell you one?

your 200 amp service implies a higher peak load, but the heating or cooling of your home still requires moving the same BTU for the same tempature change.

you can buy beef from $2 to $100 a pound, the higher price is taster and tender but a pound is still 16 ounces.

sending 70 pounds via parcel post takes longer than 70 pounds via Fedex overnight and is priced differently.

what other consumable would you expect to use more of without paying more for?

As I said before, ComCast sells a higher level of bandwidth marketed at a higher price as Business class for those that think they need more.

The iPad problem lies with some other provider, ComCast does some wi-fi but no LTE.

Be careful with your analogies.

The car manufacturers/dealers don't set the speed limits. On the autobahn in Germany you can drive it as fast as it is safe. Are you saying that Comcast shouldn't lease you a DOCSIS 3 modem if your system doesn't have channel bonding yet?

Yes, the 200 Amp service does allow me to turn on more equipment at the same time, but there is still an expectancy that I can use them whenever I want, and only worry about the size of electric bill (whoops, but that's metering!).

Yes, sometimes there are power shortages during peak usage days, and the electric company then asks people to cut their usage.

That happens because though everyone may have 200 Amp service, normally they are not all using a large amount of current at the same time, and statistically the network can handle it. But on hot days, everyone starts turning on their A/Cs and having them run longer duty-cycles, so the network is strained. If this starts happening more frequently, then the electric company needs to improve their system, or stop hooking up more customers.

Yes, a tastier cut of meat is more expensive, like a better QoS - that's why Business Class costs more than residential.

The same goes for Fedex vs. Parcel Post, but now you are also talking speed. However, does Fedex limit how many boxes you can ship each day? If they start getting overwhelmed with shipments, then they need to either add more planes and trucks, or stop taking packages.

I thought my example with the New iPad with a faster data link clearly showed that giving people more speed only leads them into using more data.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

Pure metered billing is the answer. Everyone pays for exactly what they use. We can see how much people LOVE that just by looking at AT&T Wireless.

Unfortunately, it will most likely end up that way. That's the way most utilities (electric, natural gas, water, etc.) are.

However, some utilities, like land-line telephone, have gone the other way, when once you may have paid for the distance and duration of each phone call, now most local and continental LD service is unlimited.

Why did that happen? Heavy competition in the land-line telephone market (first in Long Distance, then later in local).

Otherwise the usage issue with cable HSI is similar to telephone (except everyone had their own copper loop to the telco office, like FiOS fibers) with more people talking more often possibly straining the telephone system. Making it unlimited for a set price only encouraged more use!

Cable was (and in many places still is) a franchised utility-like service. However, with telco DSL (like AT&T U-verse), Satellite TV (DirecTV and Dish), Verizon FiOS, etc. there is much more competiiton now.

Given how Comcast is acting, however, I guess there just isn't enough of it yet. Only Verizon's FiOS, which still has only limited availablity, can match Comcast in residential HSI speeds.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

Be careful with your analogies.

Now I believe you are being deliberately obtuse.
I'm done with this thread.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

said by tshirt:

said by telcodad:

Be careful with your analogies.

Now I believe you are being deliberately obtuse.
I'm done with this thread.

Sorry that you feel that way. I just explained why I thought your analogies didn't fit this case.

I guess we just see things differently on this. Otherwise I enjoy (and agree with) most of your posts.

KevTech
Premium
join:2002-08-22
Seattle, WA
reply to telcodad

This is another waste of space thread just like....»[Caps] Please sign the petition to raise or eliminate the cap

Cap is not going away anytime soon if ever.



NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

said by KevTech:

This is another waste of space thread just like....»[Caps] Please sign the petition to raise or eliminate the cap

Cap is not going away anytime soon if ever.

The phrase "just like" is apt since this thread is simply a continuation of what got the other thread locked.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

I thought Business Class HSI service was more expensive not only because it has no data cap, but because of its much better Quality of Service (QoS), with its separate dedicated support group (and different support telephone number) and much shorter response/repair times.

Yep, that's a fixed cost difference between res and business... The remainder (and the reason the difference between res and business is nonlinear based on the speed tier) is due to the expected consumption differences.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

said by JohnInSJ:

said by telcodad:

I thought Business Class HSI service was more expensive not only because it has no data cap, but because of its much better Quality of Service (QoS), with its separate dedicated support group (and different support telephone number) and much shorter response/repair times.

Yep, that's a fixed cost difference between res and business... The remainder (and the reason the difference between res and business is nonlinear based on the speed tier) is due to the expected consumption differences.

Yes, that's true, businesses are expected to have more internet usage than a typical residence, for their office use.

I guess their websites are then hosted on a Comcast server. The internet access to those servers must be at a multi-Gbps rate and possibly asymmetrical the other way (higher on the upstream than downstream).


IPPlanMan
Holy Cable Modem Batman

join:2000-09-20
Washington, DC
kudos:1

2 edits
reply to telcodad

No analogies are necessary here, and they distract from the main issue.

Comcast has done several things to show that congestion is a canard and that its 250GB cap is prohibitively low for residential usage.

If the 250GB cap was really high enough (Not having been raised since October 2008), why would Comcast go out of its way to tell you that streaming to an XBox doesn't count against your usage cap. If hitting the cap wasn't an issue for all but the biggest data hog customers, which are supposedly less than 1% of users, why would Comcast say that so publicly for everyone to read?

Comcast has a real-time congestion management system... The 250GB cap does nothing to address real-time congestion. If there's no congestion, what's the problem? Comcast would have you believe there's one so that you use their Video-On-Demand services instead of conservatively using iTunes/Apple TV/Vudu/Netflix.

Comcast sells a business tier, for a nominal price increase....Starting at 59.95.... with no 250 GB cap. This price includes a whole bunch of goodies: Outlook mail, Sharepoint, Microsoft Cloud Services, Webhosting, 24x7 Business Class Support, which don't come with the residential tier. Is Comcast expecting me to believe that it can offer all these extras with no 250 GB Data Cap, for only a smidgen more than the residential tier? So if the price is nearly the same, I would postulate that data usage from these customers isn't an issue either. It also shows that the 250 GB Cap, which hasn't changed since October 2008 is completely arbitrary and designed to prevent cord cutting to Netflix/iTunes/AppleTV/Vudu by residential users.

Like I said years ago, with resolutions increasing (Apple TV now supporting 1080p for example) and file sizes getting bigger, 250 GB gets you less and less of the Internet every day.

Not fooling me Comcast. Not in the slightest.
--
"We're going to start at one end of (Fallujah), and we're not going to stop until we get to the other. If there's anybody left when that happens, we're going to turn around and we're going to go back and finish it."
Lt. Col. Pete Newell: 1st Inf. US Army



telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

Yes, I mostly agree.

While the cap may have originally been used to avoid speed slowdowns in the local cable plant (see the anti-cable FiOS commercials), with the wide deployment of DOCSIS 3.0 and the extra spectrum available now, from the digital migration, for more HSI QAM carriers (not all that freed B/W needed to go to HDTV/VoD), this is no longer an issue.

However, the current cap is keeping a lid on many heavy residential users, so if the cap was suddenly removed, the probable resulting spike in traffic may again cause speed slowdowns in many areas again.

That's why I'm in favor of speed-tier varying caps, or paying an extra fee to run higher/un-capped.

Of course, for the heaviest residential users, nothing is keeping them from getting uncapped right now by moving to Business Class HSI but a higher cost. Does Comcast restrict the number of Business Class HSI users per HSI node?

There is a good article on the Digital Trends site about ISP data caps:

Are bandwidth caps about easing congestion, or protecting television?
Digital Trends - February 16, 2012
»www.digitaltrends.com/computing/···evision/



espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2

said by telcodad:

There is a good article on the Digital Trends site about ISP data caps:

Are bandwidth caps about easing congestion, or protecting television?
Digital Trends - February 16, 2012
»www.digitaltrends.com/computing/···evision/

The fallacy of the "cap protects video" argument is that even without a cap the infrastructure simply doesn't exist to support even a 1% full-time conversion of people from traditional video to online-only delivery.

We've had this discussion here before: »Re: [Caps] the dreaded call - 1,817G


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

Thanks for the link to that thread, it was very informative. It was around a bit before I became a CHSI user last September, and it appears the "cap discussion" comes around periodically (this time triggered by the Xbox VoD app's cap exclusion).

I have a particular problem with at least one of the types of pro-cap arguments that is typically given, the "I/My whole family/Everyone I know doesn't come anywhere near the current 250GB data cap, so you must be doing something illegal with your HSI service" one.

That's like telling someone who has a very long, daily work commute that they must be drug running or bootlegging because they are putting 3000 miles on their car a month, because "most people" put less than a 1000 on theirs. The person obviously has a very legit reason for putting so much mileage on his car.

When people then see that, they then say "why don't you just switch to public transportation (Business Class)? Well, maybe they don't want to incur the higher cost of doing that or like riding in those types of vehicles (limited choice of modem).

The thing is, some residential HSI users have very legitimate reasons for using so much more data (frequent downloading of large application/game/multimedia files, on-line backups, etc.) that the average residential HSI user. Just telling them to "sign up for Business Class" isn't always the answer.

Having a way to increase your cap, by paying an extra fee, signing up for a more costly, higher-speed tier that has a higher cap, etc. I think would be a more acceptable solution.

Look, I don't come anywhere near the 250GB cap myself, but by Comcast excluding their new Xbox VoD app from the data cap, it just indicated to me, and many others, that the cap just "protects video" by limiting Comcast's competition.

Comcast's original excuse was that the VoD app's data was “being delivered over our private IP network and not the public Internet.” However, it still passes through the same local HFC plant. Once they realized that excuse would't fly, they changed it to "it's similar to traditional cable television service that is delivered to the set-top box" and the app essentially acts as an additional cable box." (see: »gigaom.com/video/comcast-xbox-faq-update/)

Some say the excuse is - "the Xbox VoD people/microsoft is paying them extra for that," then why can't Netflix users pay an extra fee to raise their cap?

Some people's rational is - "there are only a relatively few Xbox VoD users, their streaming traffic won't impact the local HSI plant much," but who's to say that the app won't take off and use grow to a significant amount, or that some areas may have a high-density of Xbox 360 users?

That's why I think this new app should cause Comcast to modify their current 250GB cap in some fashion, if only because it hasn't been changed in all this time, while the offered speeds and typical usage has since greatly increased.



espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2

said by telcodad:

Just telling them to "sign up for Business Class" isn't always the answer.

Having a way to increase your cap, by paying an extra fee, signing up for a more costly, higher-speed tier that has a higher cap, etc. I think would be a more acceptable solution.

I'm not sure where you're going with this. Ignore the product labels for a minute and Comcast sells 2 major types of HSI service: One has a selection of available transfer rates, each has a 250GB cap, and adheres to a defined price schedule. The other also has a selection of transfer rates, has no cap, and has a higher price schedule.

said by telcodad:

Some people's rational is - "there are only a relatively few Xbox VoD users, their streaming traffic won't impact the local HSI plant much," but who's to say that the app won't take off and use grow to a significant amount, or that some areas may have a high-density of Xbox 360 users?

Have you read the reviews? The Reader's Digest version: "It's all the things available on demand with the cable boxes, just with lower video quality." Awesome. Sounds exactly like the type of service that is going to catch on like wildfire.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

said by espaeth:

said by telcodad:

Just telling them to "sign up for Business Class" isn't always the answer.

Having a way to increase your cap, by paying an extra fee, signing up for a more costly, higher-speed tier that has a higher cap, etc. I think would be a more acceptable solution.

I'm not sure where you're going with this. Ignore the product labels for a minute and Comcast sells 2 major types of HSI service: One has a selection of available transfer rates, each has a 250GB cap, and adheres to a defined price schedule. The other also has a selection of transfer rates, has no cap, and has a higher price schedule.

Yes, but there are other differences with Business Class, like restricted choice of modem.

Since the residential HSI would still be capped, I would expect that it would be somewhat less expensive for the same rate.

julian4

join:2011-04-24
Palm Beach, FL

As long the internet keeps slipping away into the dark reaches of the corporate realm, instead of being the medium it started out as.
We can barter with ourselves forever mercilessly about what a free medium should now cost.
I don't know why the internet is not utility now, in which you just pay to be hooked up to a national fiber structure, coast to coast, and everywhere in between, just like the electrical grid, with rates that are totally reasonable to all, and the same service to all. Maybe it should have a place in our property taxes, like the garbage collection service, like building roads. There is no one who can deny this scenario as a feasible means of service.
Comcast will NEVER give the people what is fair. (or any other provider for that matter) (Being content providers make it double trouble)



espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
reply to telcodad

said by telcodad:

Yes, but there are other differences with Business Class, like restricted choice of modem.

I'll bite: why would anyone care about this?


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

said by espaeth:

said by telcodad:

Yes, but there are other differences with Business Class, like restricted choice of modem.

I'll bite: why would anyone care about this?



--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.