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xspork

@comcast.net

1 edit

[Connectivity] Help:We accidentally cut our comcast HSI line

So we were tilling our yard yesterday and the cable was only buried about 4 inches deep. No surprise that the tiller cut the cable.

Now, I'm wondering if Comcast will charge us to fix this since we cut it.

Also, would it be possible to just stick a connector on the cut cable, run a new cable to the wall and use some of that heatshrink with the glue on the junction? Rebury and be OK?

Don't mind doing it myself today yet cause my wife really wants to watch something on TV tonight lol...I have coax strippers, so I'm thinking the heat shrink, push on connectors and a 10 foot length of coax should run me about $10-15...

Probably cheaper than the service charge if there is one, and then my wife or I won't have to miss work for the visit.


xspork

@comcast.net

Re: [Connectivity] Help: We accidentally cut our comcast HCI lin

Oops just noticed the typo in the title, should be HSI line. We have HD TV and HSI coming in on the cable we cut, so that's why I'm worried about a DIY job...I'm thinking any noise from the patch might cause some connectivity issues...


defiant
MVM
join:2000-09-04
Monroe, MI
kudos:2
reply to xspork
Push-on/crimp-on connectors have long since fallen out of favor for compression-type connects, which are much more secure and weather resistant. You might be able to get a compression style tool and connectors kit at a local HomeDepot/Lowe's (or similar). Also, like you said, some RG-6, barrel connectors and some heatshrink just might do the job, provided you read up on properly stripping and terminating the coax.
--
Employee of Charter Communications. The views and opinions expressed in the post above may not reflect those of my employer.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
by the time you buy decent tools, connectors, and cable you will have spent more the what ComCast MIGHT charge you for the repair.
if you are finish tilling just have the repair done correctly by CC.


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
usually the tool itself costs a good deal, so yeah its probably better to have Comcast fix it


defiant
MVM
join:2000-09-04
Monroe, MI
kudos:2
reply to xspork
For example:
»www.lowes.com/pd_231102-12704-33···cetInfo=

If someone near you carries something like this. Connectors and tool, $20. I also saw Lowe's carry compression splices, which would eliminate the need for the barrels, but I'm not sure if the included tool is compatible with the T&B compression splices.

It's your call...
--
Employee of Charter Communications. The views and opinions expressed in the post above may not reflect those of my employer.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to xspork
should have called 811.....

just get a service call so it wont cause any more problems....
--
I'm better than you!


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 recommendation

said by gar187er:

should have called 811.....

Not sure if you were being funny, but the OP said "the cable was only buried about 4 inches deep. No surprise that the tiller cut the cable." It wasn't like they were installing an in-ground sprinkler system or a pool.

What is the minimum/usual depth these cables should be buried?

Who, buried it? Comcast or someone else?


Robotics
See You On The Dark Side
Premium
join:2003-10-23
Louisa, VA
reply to xspork
Comcast can not charge you. If indeed the cable is only 4 inches below ground, then the cost is on them or the contractor they have. I don't think they will attempt to charge you, when you mention it only being 4 inches deep.

Out here in Virginia, 8 to 12 inches depth is the norm for cable and phone.
--
Long you live and high you fly, and smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry,
and all you touch and all you see, is all your life will ever be.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
there is no set depth for cable burial(unlike other utilities).....they can charge the customer for not calling 811 and being the one to damage the cable.
--
I'm better than you!


xspork

@comcast.net
said by gar187er:

there is no set depth for cable burial(unlike other utilities).....they can charge the customer for not calling 811 and being the one to damage the cable.

Thats what I am worried about...I mean we didn't call becuase like someone else said we were only tilling the yard. We didn't expect the cable to buried so shallow. But we do get signs like thay saying call before you dig and if there is no regulations on cable depth we are screwed.

Anyway, my neighbor ended up having a stripper tool, so I got 2 heatshrink tubes with glue on the inside, barrel connectors and the pushon connectors at Home Depot for a little over $10....

So far so good, TV looks fine and for the modem we have for downstream:

Signal strength: 3.3635 dBmV 3.8685 dBmV 3.4042 dBmV 3.4870 dBmV
Signal noise ratio: 38.258 dB 38.605 dB 38.258 dB 38.258 dB

and upstream:
Transmission signal strength: 48.7500 dBmV 49.0000 dBmV

Now I guess I just have to hope that those heatshrinks will stay water tight and fend off any corrosion...


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 edit
reply to gar187er
said by gar187er:

there is no set depth for cable burial(unlike other utilities).....they can charge the customer for not calling 811 and being the one to damage the cable.

OK, so what is considered "digging" (vs. only "tilling")?

If the OP wanted to walk over his lawn wearing Aerating shoes (»www.amazon.com/Clean-Air-Distrib···03EGIBXK), would he still be required to call 811?


beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5
Anything that disturbs soil in the yard. If you are going to be doing anything like that near where the utility lines run, call 811 and have it marked. It's free.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.


beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5
reply to xspork
I would still call to have it repaired properly before you bury it again.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to xspork
oh god push ons........CALL IN.....
--
I'm better than you!


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
reply to xspork
IMO, I don't recommend a "D.I.Y." for a UG (underground drop).


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
reply to gar187er
well first i never heard of 811 and second the OP could always blame it on vandelism and play dumb.


defiant
MVM
join:2000-09-04
Monroe, MI
kudos:2
reply to gar187er
said by gar187er:

oh god push ons........CALL IN.....

Well... a few bucks more and it could have been done reasonably right. I tried...
--
Employee of Charter Communications. The views and opinions expressed in the post above may not reflect those of my employer.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to Mike Wolf
or he just call and be honest.....such a novel idea....
--
I'm better than you!


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to beachintech
said by beachintech:

Anything that disturbs soil in the yard. If you are going to be doing anything like that near where the utility lines run, call 811 and have it marked. It's free.

Checked »www.call811.com/when-to-call/default.aspx and this is what it says:

"Homeowners often make risky assumptions about whether or not they should get their utility lines marked, but every digging job requires a call - even small projects like planting trees and shrubs. The depth of utility lines varies and there may be multiple utility lines in a common area."

It's just hard to believe that there is no specific depth criteria to use to make the decision to call.


pende_tim
Premium
join:2004-01-04
Andover, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to defiant
said by defiant:

said by gar187er:

oh god push ons........CALL IN.....

Well... a few bucks more and it could have been done reasonably right. I tried...

Well in a year or so if the connection fails, then call Comcast, play dumb, and let them fix it properly.
--
The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.


defiant
MVM
join:2000-09-04
Monroe, MI
kudos:2
Or, when they catch the ingress/egress.
Expand your moderator at work


kara

@comcast.net
reply to xspork

Re: [Connectivity] Help: We accidentally cut our comcast HCI lin

If no one has told you yet, you don't want to touch the cut cable outside just call comcast support they let dispatch know to send maint tech to repair it. I have yet to see someone charge for it only cable you maybe charge for is for tamper with comcast cables like the cut one and box on house that against the terms of service. Be smart and call them. Now repair inside the house it customer maybe charge but service protection plan helps it you leave in stand alone home.


jaynick
lit up
Premium
join:2001-02-06
Sterling Heights, MI
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Mike Wolf
said by Mike Wolf:

well first i never heard of 811.

I hadn't either but things evolve all the time. During my career with Ma Bell it was known at least in these parts as Miss Dig.


kara

@comcast.net
reply to xspork
Sorry for spelling errors late nite and i just got off work lol.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to gar187er
said by gar187er:

there is no set depth for cable burial(unlike other utilities).....they can charge the customer for not calling 811 and being the one to damage the cable.

this is a gross over-generalization. It depends on the jurisdiction.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
google this "(sqrt(cos(x))*cos(200*x)+sqrt(abs(x))-0.7)*(4-x*x)^0.01, sqrt(9-x^2), -sqrt(9-x^2)"


Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to xspork
I have been following this tread from its beginning and agree with parts, but not all.
The maintenance guy at my house was digging and cut the underground RG6 into. Of course everything died. This happened a year before Comcast took over so guess it was AtHome, AT&T or whatever.
I got some in line connectors from a Dish guy and redid the connection. I didn't have any compression connectors or the tool so just used the crimp on type connectors. Used some heat shrink and a couple underground splice kits I had left over from my Bell Telephone days. Put it in the ground and covered it up.
I figured if it started having trouble I would call whoever the ISP was.
That was over 10 years ago and have not had any problems with that connection at all. My signal levels are excellent.
So because a person doesn't have Comcast fix the cut doesn't mean it's not going to work for many years.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by Wayne99021:

So because a person doesn't have Comcast fix the cut doesn't mean it's not going to work for many years.

You are right, it doesn't, but the other sceniro is it dies when the new lawn is in, and the the op can't quite remember exactly where the cut was so the tech spends more time and make a mess of the new lawn...OP complains
or it happens under 3 feet of snow with the ground frozen solid, etc. etc.
What is a simple to repair correctly today, is a timebomb for ComCast somewhere down the road, which is why often the tech won't push the bill for today's repair, even in an obvious negligence case like this.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to telcodad
Looks like the criteria vary from state to state. On the NJ "811" site (»www.nj1-call.org/), I found this section in the NJ "Underground Facility Protection Act" (»www.nj1-call.org/docs/N.J.S.A.%2···0seq.pdf ):

"Excavate" or "excavating" or "excavation" or "demolition" means any operation in which earth, rock, or other material in the ground is moved, removed, or otherwise displaced by means of any tools, equipment, or explosive, and includes but is not limited to drilling, grading, boring, milling to a depth greater than six inches, trenching, tunneling, scraping, tree and root removal, cable or pipe plowing, fence post or pile driving, and wrecking, razing, rending, or removing any structure or mass material, but does not include routine residential property or right-of-way maintenance or landscaping activities performed with non-mechanized equipment, excavation within the flexible or rigid pavement box within the right-of-way, or the tilling of soil for agricultural purposes to a depth of 18 inches or less;"

So, in NJ, it looks like you're OK if you don't dig deeper than 6 inches (or tilling your farm soil to a depth of less than 18 inches).