dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1353
share rss forum feed


Bob Elek

@verizon.com

This is Bob Elek with Verizon.

The vast majority of our DSL customers enjoy it as part of a bundle with reliable home voice and TV service. By bundling, customers receive a better overall experience and value by having multiple services as part of a package.

Our decision to adjust the way we offer DSL service after May 6 more accurately represents the broadband customer base at Verizon. By discontinuing a stand-alone DSL offer after May 6, we can control our cost structure more effectively, enabling us to continue providing competitively priced services to existing and new customers.

New DSL customers going forward will be getting the best value we can offer for the service even with voice added. There will be no changes to service for all existing DSL customers.

We’ve proactively provided existing customers a 30-day advance notice to make speed upgrades or downgrades to their existing service if they choose to do so.


rclark

join:2010-08-11

said by Bob Elek :

... By discontinuing a stand-alone DSL offer after May 6, we can control our cost structure more effectively...

You mean by forcing customers with limited or no other options to pay for additional services they don't want or need!

You sir are an a$$.


scott2020

join:2008-07-20
MO
reply to Bob Elek

That's a good one! Which one of you guys anonymously posted this? You should be paid! Is this a late April Fool's joke? hahaha! Classic.

By adjusting the way we offer DSL, making you purchase something you don't want or need, we are able to control our executive bonus structure more effectively, enabling us to continue a lavish lifestyle while taking advantage of a duopoly and price collusion that you stupid idiots will never defeat!

We are proactively giving existing customers a 30-day advance notice to stock up on lube, with extra sand included.


dustman81

join:2002-05-28
Tallmadge, OH
reply to Bob Elek

I'm not a Verizon customer, but I have never had a landline. Ever. I have naked DSL through AT&T and with my cell phone, see no reason to get a landline. POTS is a dead technology.


jjeffeory

join:2002-12-04
USA
reply to Bob Elek

Word spaghetti....

Nonsensical!


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to Bob Elek

Better value... by forcing them to have a service that no one wants and no one will use?


PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms
reply to scott2020

said by scott2020:

That's a good one! Which one of you guys anonymously posted this? You should be paid! Is this a late April Fool's joke? hahaha! Classic.

I thought that it was a joke too, but Bob Elek does appear to be a real person at Verizon....

»newscenter.verizon.com/media-con···ces.html


alphapointe
Don't Touch Me
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-10
Columbia, MO
kudos:2
reply to Bob Elek

One moment while I hack up a hairball...

**BULLSHIT**

There, all better.


moes

join:2009-11-15
Cedar City, UT

1 recommendation

reply to Bob Elek

Bob, I am going to say this nicely, Shove it out your ass.

Thanks

Teleco user


Crookshanks

join:2008-02-04
Binghamton, NY

1 recommendation

reply to dustman81

said by dustman81:

POTS is a dead technology.

C'mon, now you're just going to the other extreme.

Name me a single voice service that can even come close to (never mind match) the reliably of POTS. If you care about reliably then POTS is the only way to go. Got a business that can't afford downtime? Get POTS. Have someone in your house with a medical condition and can't take the risk of losing access to E911? Get POTS.

During the floods here last September Time Warner's "digital phone" product failed all over town. POTS kept running like a champ, even in those towns that were without power for more than a week. There was one small town out this way where the flood waters even reached Frontier's CO; DSL service went down in that town but POTS kept working in spite of the two feet of water in the central office.

One of my consulting customers is an insurance agency that changed to TW's phone product against my recommendation. They had no phones in their office for more than a week after the waters had receded. Guess how many customers they lost when insureds couldn't reach them to file flood claims in a timely manner? Ultimately they wound up running their business off cell phones for more than a week; hardly an acceptable solution for a 35 employee enterprise.

Oh, and guess what? In that same office there was a old POTS line attached to a DSL account that we never got around to shutting off. It STILL worked. They were able to use it for faxing and it was the one bright spot in an otherwise miserable week.

We had the POTS lines reinstalled the minute Verizon was able to schedule a truck roll. Go without your phone service for more than a week and the "savings" that VOIP offers you starts to look quite meaningless.


VZcust

@verizon.net
reply to Bob Elek

I used to have Verizon DSL + voice but switched to standalone DSL and a VOiP voice provider because it is much cheaper, with better features and equal reliability.

If I move, cable Internet will probably be cheaper than Verizon DSL + unwanted voice, so I will probably switch to cable, and Verizon will lose a customer.

Assuming Verizon makes money providing DSL-only service, losing customers like me doesn't seem to be a smart move by Verizon.


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to Crookshanks

Verizon CDMA 1x. Seriously, no one wants landlines. No one wants another phone number, and not being able to reach people in a household directly. They are for old people who haven't made the all-wireless switch yet.

Sure, CDMA 1x can go down, but so can landlines. Cable phone is a disaster. Nowhere near the reliability of cell/POTS.

For a business, if the customers have their cell phone numbers in the first place, or if they have GV set to go to cell phone, who cares?

The savings is not VOIP. The savings is not having a landline in the first place. They are obsolete.


rtfm

join:2005-07-09
Washington, DC
reply to Bob Elek

said by Bob Elek :

Our decision to adjust the way we offer DSL service after May 6 more accurately represents the broadband customer base at Verizon. By discontinuing a stand-alone DSL offer after May 6, we can control our cost structure more effectively, enabling us to continue providing competitively priced services to existing and new customers.

Meanwhile, the Verizontal Left Hand is urging all FIOS victi^H^H^H customers to drop their regulated POTS over FIOS in favor of unregulated VOIP service from Verizontal Airline & Storm Door company.

THEN they whine to the state PSC's that they are "losing wireline customers...."

bn1221

join:2009-04-29
Cortland, NY
reply to Bob Elek

Cost control? Yes Bob that's why its now $60.00 to get a 384K*1024K line now instead of the 14.99 "price for life" that Verizon used to offer.

I can get 5*30Mbit cable from Time Warner for 49.99....


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to rtfm

Victims? Dude, I would LOVE to have FIOS. Why all the haters?



DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Bob Elek

Dear Mr. Elek:

Perhaps if Verizon's copper voice product offerings weren't stuck in 1992 you'd have less blow-back regarding this change, and reduced defection to VoIP competitors overall. There is ABSOLUTELY NO EXCUSE for your copper service to not match the features of VoIP services feature for feature after a decade of various efforts, and at a price point no more than $5 or $10 greater to cover plant servicing. Promote that as a premium for copper voice being more reliable than cableco or wireless in the event of weather or other unusual situations. Keep a bare-bones copper voice tier for seniors/disabled/low-income that costs $10 or less with an optional $5 basic 1M Internet tier if they want it.

Sex-up your Freedom packages with all calling features AND DSL as standard. Roll-out CallAssistant across the board (getting rid of stupid impediments like it not being compatible with virtual number service), or get in bed with Google Voice and come up with a solution to replace CallAssistant.

The entry-level copper voice/DSL bundle goes for $35.99 includes unlimited local/regional and up to 7M DSL; next step up is unlimited US & Canada LD and up to 15M DSL for $45.99; and an International calling tier for $55.99. If an address can't get DSL service, provide a fixed LTE solution for the same price WITHOUT CAPS.

Offer a femto gizmo THAT DOES NOT EAT CELL MINUTES for FREE on the 7M & 15M DSL bundles since that offloads traffic from your kissing-cousin's wireless network.

Lastly, for those who might want a video option but can't use DirecTV (such as people in MDUs who don't face south), offer Flexview for an extra $20.

Since Verizon says it doesn't intend to rollout FiOS beyond where it already is, an approach such as this would once again make copper attractive and worthwhile both for consumers and Verizon. The costs of reworking the products would be negligible...probably much cheaper than selling-off copper markets.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH

Problem is, VOIP is like $3/mo (Ooma). Why femto? What about just doing wifi calling on the phone itself?



DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Not everyone has a wifi-capable phone, or wants to use a voip client instead of their cell number.

Ooma may cost $3 but most services still cost more than that. And that price point won't support plant maintenance.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH

All smartphones from the last 5+ years are Wifi capable. T-Mobile does it this way, and it's one of the few high points of their otherwise lousy service and network.

I'm not making the argument that $3/mo would support plant maintenance. I'm just saying that Ooma is the competition, and that's what the telcos have to deal with. Really, the fact of the matter is that voice service is nearly fully commoditized, and the commoditized price is near $0. As a result, they need to do internet and TV, since internet is the fundamental pipe, and usually duopoly, and TV still has good margins. In order to effectively do that, they need FTTH.



DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

You are again making the erroneous assumption that everyone has a smartphone. Many people don't. Even those that do have them do not universally have a voip client.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH

If they're not advanced enough to have a smartphone, they probably aren't the type of user who would care. If it's really that big of a deal, then offer both.



DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

Not everyone has need of a smartphone, and it is not acceptable to brand them as "not advanced enough." Some indeed are but, believe it or not, many people still use phones primarily to talk; some only want occasional Internet access on the go. I happen to be one of those folks, and I am certainly not a Luddite or unsophisticated user. I could see a femto as handy when I am home and calls come in on it when I'm at home during peak, but only if it didn't use minutes. VZ, of course, just can't shake the ILEC mindset that a phone is black and hardwired to the wall, and will continue to miss the mark when it comes to understanding they need to be giving consumers what they want at prices they consider acceptable.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms

said by DC DSL:

Not everyone has need of a smartphone, and it is not acceptable to brand them as "not advanced enough." Some indeed are but, believe it or not, many people still use phones primarily to talk; some only want occasional Internet access on the go.

Exactly.

I have over 16,000 posts on this website, and probably 10,000 of them deal with VoIP. My business and my home both use advanced VoIP services.

Yet I do NOT have a smartphone, I have no particular need for a smartphone. In fact, many of the people who do have smartphones are not so smart.

My cell phone is a refurbished Motorola W385 which was dirt cheap. My cellular service costs me about $ 7 a month using the Verizon network through PagePlus. Yes, $ 7 a month which makes me smarter than some of those smartphone users.

It is precisely because I am so heavily into VoIP that I have no use/need/interest in smartphones.

PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms
reply to BiggA

said by BiggA:

I'm just saying that Ooma is the competition, and that's what the telcos have to deal with.

Ooma is a relatively small and relatively stagnant player.

Tens of millions of people have gone with cable company phone services like Comcast Digital Voice, Optimum Voice, etc. A few million more have gone with Vonage. Many businesses use Skype especially for international calling.

Then there are many independent VoIP providers, especially in the business market....Paetec, Vocalocity, 8x8, Junction Networks, CallCentric, many others.

Yes, it's a tough market. And many young people go cellular only for their personal use.

But VoIP is a big factor, and VoIP continues to grow as POTS declines.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to DC DSL

Verizon is a landline company. Cellco partnership is partially owned by them. Smartphones are the way of the present, and the future. By and large, people who actually use their phones have smartphones. Femtocells and Wifi callilng are for coverage at the moment, not capacity offload.

Well, even if the masses haven't figured it out yet, Ooma has set the price for home phone service at $0 plus taxes and fees.

No one I know is going to have a landline after college. They will be 100% cell. Some of them won't have cable, although I suspect they'll be missing that pretty quick.

I think VOIP will ultimately be big for business use, where having a desk phone makes sense, but for home use, land line-replacement VOIP is just a little temporary thing, 100% wireless is the true future. VOIP services like Skype are here to stay, both for international, and for computer to computer.



zoom314

join:2005-11-21
Yermo, CA
Reviews:
·DSL EXTREME
·Time Warner Cable
reply to DC DSL

I also do not have a smart phone, My cell phone is a Samsung u540 clamshell phone(think StarTrek Communicator which the phone resembles), it can receive texts and play music or take pics, all those cost extra and I like to just use the phone as a phone, but then the copper landlines in Yermo are really only good for DSL, as that's why I moved to a cell phone, I can actually hear and talk to people now, before on Verizon landlines I couldn't.