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dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

"Jupiter" launch date/time set

The launch window for the satellite is set for 5:33-6:01 p.m. EDT on June 19th. Subject, of course, to delays that are normal in the business.

Under the old Hughes, both the satellite and the service were called Jupiter. Under Echostar, the satellite is now Echostar 17 and the service is Gen4.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 105W or 121W, .74 meter G74 on 89W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool


Anon

While the launch date/time has been set, the satellite has not yet been delivered to the launch site. Once the satellite is delivered it takes a minimum of 22 days to prep it for launch. If it doesn't get finished in the next couple of weeks, the launch date will slip.

The other thing impacting a launch is the launch of a rocket this month (VA206). I believe it is schedule for launch May 15th. If it doesn't launch it could very well push back the launch of VA207, which will carry Echostar 17.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

Re: "Jupiter" launch date/time set

Like I said, "Subject, of course, to delays that are normal in the business."


Anon

Normal delays...no doubt! Wasn't Viasat-1 over a year late?


A Tech

join:2008-11-10

said by :

Normal delays...no doubt! Wasn't Viasat-1 over a year late?

pesky hydraulic fluid.

Anon

I wouldn't have wanted to be the person that spilled it!

But seriously, the next 10 days will tell alot about how optimistic things look for a June launch.



theGhostPony

join:2009-07-31
Lexington, KY
reply to dbirdman

Here's a question that I've been dying to ask...

What good is a new bird to a company who can't manage the infrastructure they already have?!?
--
Having HughesNet is like paying the garbage man to DELIVER trash to your house.


Anon

Because part of the infrastructure are the satellites in space. And right now, the satellites' capacity are a bottleneck within the infrastructure. So you invest to deal with eliminating or reducing the bottleneck.



theGhostPony

join:2009-07-31
Lexington, KY

Let me rephrase that...

What good is a new bird in the sky to a company who can't manage the [earth based] infrastructure they already have?!? These guys at HN give most of us regular folks the impression that they couldn't manage their way out of a damned cardboard box.
--
Having HughesNet is like paying the garbage man to DELIVER trash to your house.


A Tech

join:2008-11-10

said by theGhostPony:

Let me rephrase that...

What good is a new bird in the sky to a company who can't manage the [earth based] infrastructure they already have?!? These guys at HN give most of us regular folks the impression that they couldn't manage their way out of a damned cardboard box.

I thought they where doing a better job than the competition even with Habib answering the phone.

Anon
reply to dbirdman

If Verizon gets their new 4G LTE up and running across more of the country, they could put a hurt on both Viasat and Hughesnet.

And neither Viasat or Hughesnet has the resources to compete IF Verizon commits to their new 4G home service. It would be sort of like the corner store trying to compete with Walmart. It just doesn't happen.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

From some of your comments I an thinking you don't live in a truly rural area. It is hard to talk about 4G in places where 3G doesn't exist. Many don't have 1 bar of 1xRTT. In such areas the talk of Verizon competing with Satellite is fantasy. The people living there would love to see it, but don't expect it.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 105W or 121W, .74 meter G74 on 89W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool


marsh_0x

join:2006-04-25
Tomahawk, WI

For what it's worth, my local Cellcom G3 is beta testing G4 39 air miles away (Wausau) , amazing in northern Wisconsin.
I'm getting G3 600-900kb/s $40 for 50GB, wireless router not a limited USB stick.
3 years ago G3 was only available in Milwaukee and Madison, dropped off and was hard to post stationary from my hospital bed.

Last week with my driver trip Rhinelander to Madison was on the internet until 40 miles from Madison because Cellcom didn't have their tower there. Still amazing technology.
165 miles without a drop off of the internet was a rewarding experience.

Also have Exede 15-19Mb/s, tho HN has lately been disappointing and will let it go in a few weeks, it served it's purpose when I was a night owl free zone.

Hold your breath with Jupiter launch, I was watching live on the big dish (C band) Shuttle Challenger disaster January 28, 1986 I shall never forget


Anon
reply to dbirdman

As a satellite Internet user...it never hurts to dream

But I have read that 4G coverage will be a little better than what 3G coverage is now, due to the technical specs of 4G.

So if you get at least some 3G signal now, chances are the 4G signal will be as good or better once a tower is upgraded. But where there is no cell service at all...satellite unfortunately remains our only hope.

But back on topic. Hopefully some news on Echostar 17 will be forthcoming soon and Loral will announce they are completed with the bird (and nothing gets spilled on it )



Pakapab
Premium
join:2002-03-17
Cap Haitien
reply to dbirdman

Just curious, does anyone have any data on how many new customers Viasat brought on with exede? Also, do you all think Hughes plans on phasing out the older Ku systems and concentrating on an all Ka service, as it would seem to be less expensive for Hughes per customer on the Ka systems.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by Pakapab:

Just curious, does anyone have any data on how many new customers Viasat brought on with exede? Also, do you all think Hughes plans on phasing out the older Ku systems and concentrating on an all Ka service, as it would seem to be less expensive for Hughes per customer on the Ka systems.

On the second part, no chance that they will phase out Ku. Shrink? Yes, they've been shrinking Ku service for the past 4 years and probably it will get much smaller.

The reason it won't go away is that it is the only service that is North-America mobile, plus it is the standard service for gas stations and mini-marts everywhere.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 105W or 121W, .74 meter G74 on 89W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

travelguy

join:1999-09-03
Santa Fe, NM

said by :

IF Verizon commits to their new 4G home service.

What do you mean? Verizon has announced national rollout several weeks ago: »www.tomsguide.com/us/Verizon-bro···054.html


dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by travelguy:

said by :

IF Verizon commits to their new 4G home service.

What do you mean? Verizon has announced national rollout several weeks ago: »www.tomsguide.com/us/Verizon-bro···054.html

First of all, an announcement last Wednesday and rollout last Thursday is not "several weeks ago."

Secondly, a rollout to 2/3 of the population may be called "national" but for most of us it is quite meaningless. Like everybody else in the broadband world, except satellite, they count bodies, not acreage. That 2/3 of the population is crammed into small chunks of real estate is undeniable. That most of us here don't want to live in that environment is also clear.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 105W or 121W, .74 meter G74 on 89W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

Anon
reply to Pakapab

I am sure Viasat will be releasing those numbers sometime over the next couple of months.

Hard to determine how many "new" customers they have brought on board. I did hear the upgrades of existing Wildblue customers to Exede occurred a lot quicker than what was originally promised. So perhaps there was not the "rush" of new subscribers that Viasat initially expected.


travelguy

join:1999-09-03
Santa Fe, NM
reply to dbirdman

The trial has been going on for several months now, and Verizon is now offering national availability. I'd say that shows a commitment to the program, wouldn't you? Their LTE coverage is in 230 markets now and will be over 400 by the end of the year, and have the potential to serve 230 million customers.

Your and my preference for living in non-LTE areas hardly changes the fact that as OldSatUser pointed out - taking away those customers from Hughes and ViaSat will hurt from a business perspective.

ViaSat and Hughes will have a choice - continue to price the service as a premium product for coverage in non-LTE areas and accept a much smaller user base, or attempt to lower their price in recognition that they are providing a lesser service (latency, FAP).


Anon

"Rural" living can be defined many different ways. For instance, if you live in the mountains of Colorado where you can't even get cell phone service, satellite is going to be about the only option. However, many areas of Indiana would be considered rural areas. And if you look at the Verizon 4G coverage map, a lot of northern Indiana is already covered by 4G.

Here is a link to a blog about the MSG-3 satellite. This is the sister satellite that is suppose to launch with Echostar 17. As you can read in the blog, MSG-3 is well on its way to having its final testing completed and ready for launch at the launch site. Conversely, Echostar 17 hasn't even arrived yet at the launch facility yet.

»msg-3launchcampaign.blogspot.com/


LouV
Lou
Premium
join:2008-11-12
Rockville, IN
reply to dbirdman

I live in the United States, at least I used to, but Verizon's nationwide service is not available to us here in central Indiana. I don't know why all the companies keep offering service to areas that have multiple choices and have to fight for customers based upon price. I would think the thing to do would be to go after areas where there is little competition.

I keep reading about how other companies can take all the customers away from Hughes, but if the don't offer the service where Hughes is they won't get any of those customers.

Lou



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by LouV:

I keep reading about how other companies can take all the customers away from Hughes, but if the don't offer the service where Hughes is they won't get any of those customers.

Lou, I agree. It is hard to imagine that the top 230, or 400, or even 1000 markets in the US don't already have cable and DSL, if not FiOS. Yes, I know that some of the Exede marketing has indicated that they were going to go after some of the metro customers, but those of us with satellite know how pie-in-the-sky that is!

Having one more broadband provider (Verizon) in those Metro areas offering particularly high-priced service is unlikely to dent satellite much.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 127W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

travelguy

join:1999-09-03
Santa Fe, NM
reply to LouV

said by LouV:

I don't know why all the companies keep offering service to areas that have multiple choices and have to fight for customers based upon price. I would think the thing to do would be to go after areas where there is little competition.

Because the MBA whiz kids that run most companies these days don't think that way. They're taught to look at deployment cost per linear mile (for wired connections), population density per square mile, and operating cost per square mile.

Those calculations essentially ignore what other alternatives exist, or assume that the company will get an equal market share. They won't and don't fight on price. That gets set by the dominant provider and everyone else follows along.

The operating cost number is particularly interesting because the two larger numbers in that are advertising and incentives. Those are followed by labor, facilities and way at the bottom of the list: bandwidth. The less potential customers you have to amortize that advertising, the higher the cost per potential customer and the less interested they are.

Not defending any of this BTW - just explaining...


chances14

join:2010-03-03
Michigan
reply to travelguy

quote:
The trial has been going on for several months now, and Verizon is now offering national availability. I'd say that shows a commitment to the program, wouldn't you? Their LTE coverage is in 230 markets now and will be over 400 by the end of the year, and have the potential to serve 230 million customers.

Your and my preference for living in non-LTE areas hardly changes the fact that as OldSatUser pointed out - taking away those customers from Hughes and ViaSat will hurt from a business perspective.


keep in mind that those 230 markets are generally just the big cities, where they already have terrestrial internet options.
chances are, most folks who have hughes or via sat are those where 3g isn't avaliable or have spotty coverage at best. i really don't think that's going to change with 4g as verizon isn't going to bother extending their 4g coverage to areas that don't even have 3g.

quote:
ViaSat and Hughes will have a choice - continue to price the service as a premium product for coverage in non-LTE areas and accept a much smaller user base, or attempt to lower their price in recognition that they are providing a lesser service (latency, FAP).

can hughes and viasat really price their service much lower? the costs of building and maintaining satellites is only going up.

Anon

You got some good points. However, I did read the range of 4G from a tower will be longer than 3G (for some technical reasons). Not to mention Homefusion requires an antenna to be mounted on the roof (this would also improve reception). So for people who get spotty 3G coverage (like myself today), 4G might be an option when a tower gets upgraded.

I guess time will tell!



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by :

MSG-3 is well on its way to having its final testing completed and ready for launch at the launch site. Conversely, Echostar 17 hasn't even arrived yet at the launch facility yet.

A partial quote from a Hughes employee in their forums today:

"The satellite has already been shipped to its rocket launch site and will be operational in a few months!"
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 127W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

Anon
reply to dbirdman

Hard to believe that. Loral has always done a press release when a satellite is completed and delivered to the launch site. No such announcement has been made on their website.

»www.ssloral.com/html/pressreleas···ess.html



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by [user= :

]Hard to believe that. Loral has always done a press release when a satellite is completed and delivered to the launch site. No such announcement has been made on their website.

»www.ssloral.com/html/pressreleas···ess.html

That is true, although it is possible that this one will be an exception because of the lawsuits surrounding it - Loral may not want to call any attention to this one.

The other thing is that you are correct that they announce delivery whereas the Hughes employee said that it was shipped.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 127W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

OldSatUser

join:2012-05-10
Fresno, OH

Perhaps they are hoping for a "secret" satellite launch...lol.

I hope what Hughes has posted is correct. But I am still skeptical. There is no mention of the satellite arriving at Arianespace (the launch company). And it provides mission updates on its rockets on a regular basis.

Of course we will all hold our breath until the bird gets into "final orbit" and starts receiving and transmitting. A lot still has to go right for that to happen.