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rchandra
Stargate Universe fan
Premium
join:2000-11-09
14225-2105

[Mobo] Ivy Bridge i7 3770 in MB designed to OC

I desperately need to do a new build (currently running on a Dell Precision 360, which is a P4 2.4GHz!!). Newegg ran out of i7 3770K parts in like two or three days. I wouldn't want to buy a bunch of stuff from them and be stuck with it, sooooo...will most MBs operate just fine if I stick a 3770 or 3770S part in them? I've tried reading through for example the ASUS P8Z77-V LK and ASRock Z77 Extreme6 manuals, and they don't seem to say much about it. They seem VERY focussed on overclocking, just about assuming a K-suffixed part will be inserted into it/them.

Better still, is there anything you folks could tell me in general about which manufacturers provide a "nonOC" setting in their BIOS setup program(s)? What I'm contemplating is waiting until they're back in stock and getting an i7 3770K, but in general running it at rated frequency and only overclocking it occasionally. I'd hate to spend that kind of money on a MB and one of those chips, then fry it.

BTW...one fact that was REALLY a surprise to me: the Intel tech manual I was going through (boy, those are long and verrrrrry detailed) stated their 3gen FC LGA1155 chips are only guaranteed to be able to be inserted 15 times!
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English is a difficult enough language to interpret correctly when its rules are followed, let alone when a writer chooses not to follow those rules.


Jeopardy! replies and randomcaps REALLY suck!



DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2

said by rchandra:

Better still, is there anything you folks could tell me in general about which manufacturers provide a "nonOC" setting in their BIOS setup program(s)? What I'm contemplating is waiting until they're back in stock and getting an i7 3770K, but in general running it at rated frequency and only overclocking it occasionally. I'd hate to spend that kind of money on a MB and one of those chips, then fry it.

ASUS has a 'Eco" setting in the bios which is the stock, non-turbo setting for the chip. I know with Sandy Bridge that it is almost impossible to fry the chip, as Intel builds in throttling. And yes, I've tested it with no ill effects. The chips are a lot more robust than you think. And the ASUS AISuite overclocking program is an absolute no-brainer.
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Need-based health care not greed-based health care.

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to rchandra

a 2700k or 2600k would work just as well, and they are in stock and you would be able to OC them. To be honest the ivy i7 ocs horridly, worse than the ivy i5, and with only having(according to the benches I saw) about a 4% boost from SB an oc's 2600k(which some can go to 5.0ghz) would beat out an oc'd ivy i7 which gets to about 98C(a very dangerous temp imho) at only 4.5ghz.

That said if you are dead set on an ivy bridge i7 the Mb will be fine. None are "made" to OC but some are made to recognize the unlocked multiplier in the K series, where as the say h67 is not made to recognize the unlocked multiplier.

And like DKS said, its hard to try these things, I've had my 2500k at 4.5ghz for the past 5 months and not a single problem has been had once I found the right voltage setting. Also the ivy bridges are rated to run upto 105C before they over heat and shut down, where as the sandy bridge is only 98C. 7C better, sure its not that much, but now the mid 70's are actually a decent temp for the chips.

"They seem VERY focussed on overclocking, just about assuming a K-suffixed part will be inserted into it/them."

They seem focused on the overclocking because people are paying extra for that feature on the boards that have it as opposed to the boards that do not.