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sparks

join:2001-07-08
Little Rock, AR
reply to Pacrat

Re: Thought I'd pass along this handy tip...

yea and with the quality of gas now, its best to use premium.
My mower would cough and sputter on high grass and and my trimmer and blower were hard to start. I purchased some premium to try and not one problem after that.



Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

My dealer advised me to use, at least, 89 octane fuel for my implements (trimmer, leaf blower, chainsaw, mower, tractor, and snow-blower), and I've been pleasantly surprised how much easier it is to get things started since I've been doing that. Everything seems to run much better on the higher octane. But, so far, I've not seen the need to go all the way to pemium. Not that I don't agree with you about not using regular gasoline... it's just that full premium seems to be a bit of overkill to me. However, whatever works for you is good.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

Octane rating or octane number is a standard measure of the performance of a motor or aviation fuel. The higher the octane number, the more compression the fuel can withstand before detonating. In broad terms, fuels with a higher octane rating are used in high-compression engines that generally have higher performance.

I doubt if trimmers, blowers chainsaws etc have enough compression to even notice the Octane of the fuel. Consumer Reports has said over and over again if the owners manual doesn't call for high octane gas because of the compression ratio then buying it is a waste of money.



supergas

@apexcovantage.com

I too doubt the mower cares about the octane but, at least around here super/premium/hi-octane is ethanol free. While regular and mid grade "may contain up-to 10% ethanol." That's the only reason I use it in my mower and trimmer. I'd like to think by now small engine manufactures have learned to deal with ethanol but it's cheap insurance.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by supergas :

I too doubt the mower cares about the octane but, at least around here super/premium/hi-octane is ethanol free. While regular and mid grade "may contain up-to 10% ethanol." That's the only reason I use it in my mower and trimmer. I'd like to think by now small engine manufactures have learned to deal with ethanol but it's cheap insurance.

I don't know where you are but here all grades are labeled 10 percent but that varies all over the place from 5 percent to 20 percent. The 20 percent is causing all kinds of grief to those buying it.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

said by Jack_in_VA:

I don't know where you are but here all grades are labeled 10 percent but that varies all over the place from 5 percent to 20 percent. The 20 percent is causing all kinds of grief to those buying it.

Even 10% is too much.
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