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voxframe

join:2010-08-02

Cable Nazis... Grab a tissue

This isn't my work, wish it was.

Stumbled across this and figured it was worth it for anyone (Myself included) who loves a nice cabling job.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY1XB0rr···=related


Yeah they used zip ties, but let's be honest, it works beautifully here and won't be a problem.


alphapointe
Don't Touch Me
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-10
Columbia, MO
kudos:2

God damn! That's AWESOME!

Someone takes GREAT pride in their work...



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:2
reply to voxframe

Oh Sweet Clam!

Fap Fap Fap.

Nice post mate!

Dave



liht
Acryllicht

join:2000-07-11
Paradise Valley, AZ
reply to voxframe

Some serious OCD going on there. Not a single cable overlapping another. All in a line. Perfectly spaced.
Either they ran one cable at a time, or they had TONS of time to do this. I'd love to know what company put that cabling in.
--
werd


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8
reply to voxframe

Ok, now show us the rats nest on the other side of those patch panels.

(For the record, it's not difficult to do that, but it is tedious and time consuming. There are tools for pulling cable bundles like that.)


TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:2
reply to voxframe

In a way, this reminds me of aircraft wiring, where all the wires have to be neatly bundled and routed, tied at specific intervals, observing proper bend radius, etc.


Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
reply to voxframe

Oh man that looks GOOD.

I can overlook the zip ties, based on workmanship.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

1 recommendation

reply to voxframe

Sad part it, 15 years ago, that wasn't impressive; that was just standard...

When I started as an installer at Nortel, there were rules about where stiches were placed on cable frames, how cables were run, etc. There was never a cross, a diver, a roll; it all looked like that. If your STRING rolled or crossed over, the quality man cut it all, and you did it again.

But we also used to get a year to build a new switch - it's done in 3 months now; and looks like shiz-nit. Anyways...

That said - that's some seriously good looking work. Someone should be proud!


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

said by LazMan:

Sad part it, 15 years ago, that wasn't impressive; that was just standard...

And they didn't use zip ties or velcro... it was all beautifully cable laced. Sadly, it's now a lost art. (just finding waxed twine is a pain.)


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

said by cramer:

And they didn't use zip ties or velcro... it was all beautifully cable laced. Sadly, it's now a lost art. (just finding waxed twine is a pain.)

Don't know about in the states - but lacing twine is still pretty easy to come by up here... Of course, finding someone that knows how to use it, that's a different story...

BTW - Lived in Raleigh back in '01 - working for Sprint up in Wake Forest... One of the nicest places I've ever been!

tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1
reply to cramer

said by cramer:

Ok, now show us the rats nest on the other side of those patch panels.

(For the record, it's not difficult to do that, but it is tedious and time consuming. There are tools for pulling cable bundles like that.)

post some of those tools you speak of.

that cabling job is nice.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

Panduit Cable bundle organizing tool
aCom Tools Cable Comb™
Patch Panel Tools "Cable Dresser"
(etc.)

Panduit makes the best, IMO, but it's a lot to pay for a $2 hunk of nylon. It makes a beautiful hex bundle.

(I've been known to make my own... ugly and short lived, but it gets the job done for pennies.)



jmich
Premium
join:2001-08-28
Toms River, NJ
reply to voxframe

Very nice. Vendors are now saying that lacing and piping cable amplifies cross-talk potential and that random cabling is better for performance. Discuss.


tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1

with random cables going every direction there is less distance between them which means less of a chance for crosstalk.

when the cables are laying on top of e/o and touching, it allows for a greater chance of crosstalk

that is how i read that post.



alphapointe
Don't Touch Me
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-10
Columbia, MO
kudos:2
reply to jmich

Bollocks... If there is any more xtalk, it's a couple hundredths of a db. If this was a real problem, Bell wouldn't have done lacing, etc. for the past hundred years with no problems.


tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1

1 recommendation

i agree. no matter what, someone will always argue the opposite.


Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2

1 edit

2 recommendations

reply to tomdlgns

I think that's a lazy excuse because the installers are generally lazy.

The last job I worked in the field on, the data comm guys stopped and watched me several times while I laced. They never had seen it before. The electricians had seen it only in black and white photos while in trade schools. There was one hvac guy who had been around the block a few times in his days and he knew exactly what it was. He commented how good it was to see someone who still did that sort of work and it had been over 20 years since he'd seen it done.

There are a few of us who still do it. It is seriously time consuming but when your cabling has to be perfect, it's the only way.
--
"Saying something in another language that you don't think the other person understands is just saying that you're a pussy and are too afraid to say it in English." --Harddrive


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8
reply to jmich

potential, yes. Reality, not so much. Cat6 has issues at 10G over longer runs, and yes, bundles amplify the problem. That's why there's a cat6A -- there will be no meaningful crosstalk at rated bandwidth over full 100m runs. (increased pair spacing, and thicker cable shell... voila the cables cannot get close enough to create a problem.)

If you're really worried about it, fork over the cash for shielded cable. For the record, I've only had to use shielded cable twice... once in a radio station, and once in a UL Labs test cage. (we still failed, btw.)



DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to alphapointe

said by alphapointe:

Bollocks... If there is any more xtalk, it's a couple hundredths of a db. If this was a real problem, Bell wouldn't have done lacing, etc. for the past hundred years with no problems.

If it were a problem then just use the unofficialy named CAT7 cable.

5 sheilds, 1 around each of the 4 pairs, and 1 over all 4 pairs, plus a proper STP RJ45 end not the normal UTP RJ45 that you normally see.

then with the shields grounded theres no chance of xtalk between cables.

However I'll say this phone lines 100 years ago were less likely to have issue with xtalk than gig or 10g over copper


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to cramer

said by cramer:

potential, yes. Reality, not so much. Cat6 has issues at 10G over longer runs, and yes, bundles amplify the problem. That's why there's a cat6A -- there will be no meaningful crosstalk at rated bandwidth over full 100m runs. (increased pair spacing, and thicker cable shell... voila the cables cannot get close enough to create a problem.)

If you're really worried about it, fork over the cash for shielded cable. For the record, I've only had to use shielded cable twice... once in a radio station, and once in a UL Labs test cage. (we still failed, btw.)

If you wanta go to the insane level then use CAT7 + 1 cable per steel conduit.

And if RF is still something to worry about go fiber.


jmich
Premium
join:2001-08-28
Toms River, NJ
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

Agreed. The instructors from Fluke and ADC both mentioned this issue in recent VAR classes. I agree that well-installed networks work better and there's a great deal of pride to be had in doing a nice job...time allowing. Another issue they mentioned from bundling is heat potential. Some PoE devices do draw a decent amperage. Not an issue in a DC but enterprise wiring.


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

Interesting points. PoE would be a special case. Using the first chart google points out [link], 100m of 24AWG (worst case, cat6 is supposed to be 22) wire would have 8.41976ohms of resistance. (PoE uses 2 parallel pairs.) 802.3af specs 15.4W (350mA) and 802.3at 34.2W (600mA.) So, a max "af" device would have just over 1W in the cable, and "at" just over 3W. If you put 48 runs in one conduit, they were all pulling full power, and they were all 100m... (an unlikely case) that would be a 50W or 146W pipe. (31 and 92 for 22AWG) That'll get toasty if there's no air moving around it. (BTW, I've seen power conduits like that, but never any data wiring.)

[PS: It's worth noting your switch or midspan would need a 750W or 1700W power supply *just for PoE* to run such a setup.]


TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:2
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel

said by cramer:

If you put 48 runs in one conduit, they were all pulling full power, and they were all 100m... (an unlikely case) that would be a 50W or 146W pipe. (31 and 92 for 22AWG) That'll get toasty if there's no air moving around it.

That works out to 1.46W per foot, which is unlikely to create any problems. Might feel slightly warm to the touch but that's about it.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to cramer

said by cramer:

[PS: It's worth noting your switch or midspan would need a 750W or 1700W power supply *just for PoE* to run such a setup.]

BTW some POE switches do have that

The ones where I work have dual 930watt powersupplies
so in theory 1860watts, I think when one PS fails it cuts the available PoE power down to what one powersupply can do.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

Yes, but they are exceedingly expensive, rather large, and generate far more heat than all the wiring in the building.


Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2

HIPOE is awesome, but you're right it is horribly expensive even in lower density options.



DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to cramer

I really don't foresee any issue with POE heating cables.

Ya the heat coming off the switches is far more than all the wiring in the place.

I was just pointing out that some switches do have that kinda wattage, though how much is for POE and how much is for the switches to do normal stuff I'm not sure but I'd bet the bulk is for POE.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to LazMan

It took a year to build and it was not touched for 20 years.



howardfine

join:2002-08-09
Saint Louis, MO
reply to voxframe

What happens when one screws up the length on one of those cables and it doesn't reach or messes up the bend? I guess there's plenty of slack in all that but I imagine, at one point, someone said...oops!


tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1

yeah, $h*t happens, but i would imagine that whoever cables like that has experience and has done it enough times to know what to expect when it is time to plan/execute that job.

but you have a point, i am sure it has happened and will continue to happen to the best ones out there.