dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
2
share rss forum feed
« FoxFi
This is a sub-selection from Why do people pay for tethering?


swintec
Premium,VIP
join:2003-12-19
Alfred, ME
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VoicePulse
·Sprint Mobile Br..
·RapidVPS
reply to Anon

Re: Why do people pay for tethering?

said by NetFixer:

Realistically what difference should it make to the carrier if the display device for viewing live Internet material is my 3" cell phone screen or my 17" notebook screen

If it is as cut and dry as that then the carriers would certainly not have any problem with that. Realistically speaking though, that is not how most will use it and if they allowed it you will end up having users power their home networks with their tethered phones. Also, you can not realistically run torrents 24/7 through your phone or run bandwidth maxing applications through just your phone...all of which can be done when connected to a computer. I think that is part of the reason why tethering is not given as an option.
--
Usenet Block Accounts | Unlimited Accounts
Expand your moderator at work

rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

1 edit

Re: Why do people pay for tethering?

Even with caps, the mobile carriers must have data that tells them most non-tethered users don't hit their cap. Even though most plans give you roughly a GB for every $10, if you pay $50 for a 5GB plan and you consistently only use 3GB, that's a win for the mobile carrier. If they let you tether for free and 3GB suddenly becomes 4GB or the 5GB limit, that's a loss for the carrier.

I don't agree with paying extra for tethering. I'm just speculating about why carrier's charge for tethering.

For the record, I have an iPhone and I pay for tethering. I love using my phone as a hot spot but I don't like paying for the privilege. However, I won't jail break my phone in an attempt to go around the carrier. With corporate discount, it only cost me $15/month more. While that's not a trivial amount, it's not enough to risk being caught and having to deal with whatever consequences the carrier might decide to level.



NetFixer
Freedom is NOT free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
·Comcast

said by rradina:

Even with caps, the mobile carriers must have data that tells them most non-tethered users don't hit their cap. Even though most plans give you roughly a GB for every $10, if you pay $50 for a 5GB plan and you consistently only use 3GB, that's a win for the mobile carrier. If they let you tether for free and 3GB suddenly becomes 4GB or the 5GB limit, that's a loss for the carrier.

I don't agree with paying extra for tethering. I'm just speculating about why carrier's charge for tethering.

For the record, I have an iPhone and I pay for tethering. I love using my phone as a hot spot but I don't like paying for the privilege. However, I won't jail break my phone in an attempt to go around the carrier. With corporate discount, it only cost me $15/month more. While that's not a trivial amount, it's not enough to risk being caught and having to deal with whatever consequences the carrier might decide to level.

I suspect that the primary reason is an assumption by the carrier's bean counters that anyone tethering might be sharing that connection with others. Without the tethering, those other users would need to have their own cell phone data plan. Of course, such sharing could be easily be detected by packet inspection and dealt with according to whatever rules there might be in the plan's TOS, but simply declaring that tethering requires an extra fee (and disabling it in popular phones) is easier to implement.

Fortunately (for some of us), that rule is not universally applied to all cell phones/plans by all carriers (but you do have to pick your cell phone and your carrier carefully, and the popular/trendy phones are not going to be exempt from the tethering ban).
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

chgo_man99

join:2010-01-01
San Jose, CA

1 edit

said by NetFixer:

Fortunately (for some of us), that rule is not universally applied to all cell phones/plans by all carriers (but you do have to pick your cell phone and your carrier carefully, and the popular/trendy phones are not going to be exempt from the tethering ban).

I think at the highest risk of target are those who are still on unlimited plans and use a lot of data. If you only use it sometimes and use tether apps (like pdanet) that have option to mask tethering then you're fine. Also if you use tablet instead laptop when you tether then all the carrier see is you use mobile agent.

I also remember according to their website, it is against their TOS to use their personal data plans to connect to corporate networks. I have used it a lot when I was on call shifts or working away from my apartment and never had a problem with it. I connect to my company's intranet using customized AT&T IPSec VPN client (at&t global network client) through at&t managed vpn. I had tethering personal plan 4gb for $45 but did not have to enroll into enterprise that cost extra $20.

rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

If tethering is tough to swallow, the personal vs. enterprise data plan is a line in the sand that's ridiculous. If the plan was unlimited, perhaps I can see why they care. An enterprise user might use significantly more and if they do, they are probably doing it for the company, the company is likely paying for it and therefore the company can pay more for that privilege.

However, with capped plans, it no longer makes any sense unless as I said earlier about tethering, perhaps the thought is the enterprise user would get closer to the 5GB cap than the personal user.

Regardless, this is kind of a lousy way to run a network...making folks pay for a certain amount of data and then statistically count on most to never to use all of it.

I would think mobile carriers have the same challenge as wired ISPs in that it isn't necessarily how much you use but the intersection of when and how much. If use a lot during peak periods, that's what kills them.