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KillBell

@videotron.ca

"Works" from bHell

Click for full size
Click for full size
Because of a broken pole -reported several months ago- Bell finally came (after 2 visits from the same tech + one from a director!) to disconnect the wires coming into my house.

The tech removed the two existing external boxes and cut the wires, leaving them protruding from the external wall.

By doing so, he also severed the connection between my indoor jacks. I had warned him beforehand I suspected that could happen since two separate wires were going in.

Not one, but two other techies came to fix the issue, by installing a (indoor) junction box on the outside as seen on the picture.

And BTW the broken pole is still there waiting for some appropriate target to fall on...

(Dumb)Bell anyone?


Chuckcar OTT

@teksavvy.com
Sounds like the problem was where the pole was not where your house is.


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Bell Fibe
reply to KillBell
The white box is called a QBB block or a 42A block and was never meant to outside the house. It used to be the main connection point for a telephone set when it was "hard wired" before the advent of jacks in the early 1980s. It became a "splice box" after for one of its many uses...but definitely "inside" the residence.
--
My Canada includes Quebec.
Disclaimer: If I express an opinion, it is my own opinion, not that of Bell or its related companies.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to KillBell
thats a shitty job, as for the pole, chances are its a pole owned by hydro as part of the 50/50 deal so bell just takes their wires off and leaves it for hydro to deal with


KillBell

@videotron.ca
reply to Glen1
Ah Glen1, you must be an old-timer .
Obviously differences between inside and outside are not part of what modern new techies are taught.

telco_mtl: Shitty job is certainly an understatement.

Actually I was generous enough not to force Bell - as I could have- to install a new demarcation box on the opposite side of the house, then some interior wiring to connect it to the existing one, before switching to another supplier. Yes, because their (Bell) broken pole -still waiting to fall as I write this- is not on my property and my neighbours do not want it to be replaced. Can't blame them, really.

Well, retrospectively, my generosity might just have saved me from some further grief, like getting some even more incompetent team to come to "work" inside my house...

By chance I'm also saving some $30 a month for the next year, and around $20 a month afterwards.


Anonymuss

@rogers.com
reply to Glen1
Although the QBB itself may not be technically outdoor rated, if the tech used scotchloks inside instead of the screw posts, then it's really not an issue.


BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
reply to KillBell
I wonder why Bell's installs are so sloppy.

Bell's FTTH for example, do they even offer a flush mount panel? Every setup I've seen so far is just like, let me throw some plywood up here and nail everything to the wall with wires hanging out like spaghetti.

Then again I also haven't seen anyone post pics of Bell FTTH in a finished basement.
--
Fiber Optics are the future of high-speed internet access. Stop by the BBR »Fiber Optic Forum.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
said by BliZZardX:

I wonder why Bell's installs are so sloppy.

Bell's FTTH for example, do they even offer a flush mount panel? Every setup I've seen so far is just like, let me throw some plywood up here and nail everything to the wall with wires hanging out like spaghetti.

Then again I also haven't seen anyone post pics of Bell FTTH in a finished basement.

i have found in commercial setups the techs do a gorgeous job, of course the cost on a business line offsets the cost of doing it right, but lately residential installs are awful.


Frank_IT
Premium
join:2003-11-01
Montreal
reply to BliZZardX
said by BliZZardX:

I wonder why Bell's installs are so sloppy.

Bell's FTTH for example, do they even offer a flush mount panel? Every setup I've seen so far is just like, let me throw some plywood up here and nail everything to the wall with wires hanging out like spaghetti.

Then again I also haven't seen anyone post pics of Bell FTTH in a finished basement.

I posted pic of mine..

»FTTH Install
--
Rogers - iPhone 4s 32gb


Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada
what a crappy job are you sure the pole is a hydro pole and not a bell pole? can u post a picture of it
--
Happiness is like peeing your pants... Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its Warmth!!


KillBell

@videotron.ca
It's a Bell pole. A tech spent two hours outside and the only visible sign of his work was the yellow band he put around the pole.

Want pics?

»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/84···le1.jpg/
»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/20···le2.jpg/
»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/98···le3.jpg/
»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/26···le4.jpg/

It all started because of the bloody pole and that's the only thing still left untouched.

RickStep
Premium
join:2002-11-25
Hamilton, ON
kudos:1

3 edits
reply to KillBell
A couple of points

While the block that was used is not normally used outside, a close look at the photos show that the installer applied silicon sealant over the entire block. It should be waterproof.

said by Anonymuss :

Although the QBB itself may not be technically outdoor rated, if the tech used scotchloks inside instead of the screw posts, then it's really not an issue.

When I worked at bell eons ago, scotchlocks were on Bell's hit list and banned from use. If we came across them, we were to correct the problem by removing them and use an approved connector OR report the problem and if dispatch felt there was spare time in the day to remove them; the work was completed. A special code was used for the work, I assume to back bill 3M for the failed connectors.

With the side of the building in poor repair, the tech and supervisor probably thought that if the siding was replaced, Bell would be called back 2 more times. Once to make a temporary connection and a second trip to properly AND cleanly find a way to route the wire for the extension OR work with the installers to run the wire under the new siding and make sure the siding installation didn't damage the routed wire now; or create a potentially future failure due to a pressure point that would eventually short out.

When I worked at Bell I started in the north end of Hamilton and my manager didn't care about the quality of the work done. Some time later I ended up working in Burlington, between Walkers Line and Appleby Line.

In Hamilton I was expected to complete 10 -12 calls a day. In Burlington, in new subdivisions, on some days 6 calls was the maximum.

In Hamilton I worked an 8 hour day; in Burlington I could work 13 hours a day if I wanted. If I/we didn’t want to work, we would call our last order in from home after dispatch closed for the day. Some dispatchers got really pushy about us taking another call so we would call from home and leave a message on the installation dispatch recorder.

I digressed; but I am not surprised that Bell has cleaned this up as a temporary but waterproofed fix.

Rick


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Bell Fibe
Rick scotch locks are in full use right now and are perfectly acceptable...perhaps you mean "B" connectors? Those were taken out of use because technicians didn't know how to use them. They would "pig tail" the wires inside instead of just placing them parallel into the sleeve. Scotch locks are the connector of choice, they are waterproof and can be used outside with no covering. A qbb block is not a proper covering no matter how much silicone you use.
--
My Canada includes Quebec.
Disclaimer: If I express an opinion, it is my own opinion, not that of Bell or its related companies.

RickStep
Premium
join:2002-11-25
Hamilton, ON
kudos:1
said by Glen1:

Rick scotch locks are in full use right now . . .

The devices that were banned (when I worked there) was a round plastic sandwich device that was held apart to allow the entry of the wires. They came in various colours and they were used to connect a buried drop to a beehive or other pic terminal. One side was pass through, to fit over the aerial cable and the other side was to connect to the drop to the home. The scotchlock is classed as an insulation displacement connector in the same class a ribbon cable connector where the applied pressure squeezes the insulation from the wire to make a point contact with the connector and as the insulation relaxes around the connector tab, air is prevented from corroding the connection.

The scotchlock required a special tool to press the 2 halves of the connector together and Bell only gave us needle nose and diagonal pliers. Most of the failures were due to incorrect tooling, because the connector required parallel compression and we installers were squeezing it together one half at a time.

The replacement connector was a device that had multiple points to pierce the insulation, had a white cover and was about 5/8" to 3/4" long.

My stint in the electronics manufacturing industry says that if you buy 3M ribbon connectors, you use 3M tooling. As an installer we didn't have 3M tooling and there were a lot of failures.

Keep in mind that the failures were with scotchlock connectors in pic terminals. Pic terminals should have all been removed and replaced years ago.

Rick


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Bell Fibe
Pic terminals were replaced long ago...I have a scotch lock plier that I use all the time...they are still being used. I have several boxes in my vehicle and carry them in my back pocket. You have to have the right tool to do the job.
--
My Canada includes Quebec.
Disclaimer: If I express an opinion, it is my own opinion, not that of Bell or its related companies.


BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
Are these the "Scotch locks" you guys are talking about? »www.amazon.com/UR-3-Connector-3-···4EEMJS4/ The last tech I saw with those only used regular plyers as well


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8


BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
What are B connectors?


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8


BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
Thanks. How on earth do you use that one?!

RickStep
Premium
join:2002-11-25
Hamilton, ON
kudos:1
said by BliZZardX:

Thanks. How on earth do you use that one?!

The B connector was the connector that we used to replace the scotchlock.

Going back 40 years, you need to know what a pic terminal was. They came in 2 flavours.

On an aerial cable on a residential street a cable was lashed to a strand and at certain telephone poles, a little slack was left.

The cable jacket was removed from the cable and a waterproof enclosure was installed to cover the bare cable for weatherproofing and the shroud also had a rigid steel back to prevent the soft copper wires from over stretching.

On a lawn pedestal, a buried cable would loop and protrude out of the ground and immediately re-enter the ground. A terminal enclosure would be installed with the cable loop inside the enclosure. The jacket at the top loop would be removed. The cover for the terminal was a steel dome nicknamed a beehive.

Pic cables were designed to be used directly with either 6 pair multi aerial drop or twin pair buried cable that was attached to the side of the pole or with copper clad steel drops that were connected to a bicycle bell housing attached to the pole and then a softer wire, inside wire (JKT or JKTN), was used between the bicycle bell and the aerial terminal.

In the case of a beehive; 2 pair buried cable was the drop.

The B connectors required that the main cable be cut. In the case of a beehive there was sufficient slack in the cable to cut the main cable pair, and the 2 ends of the cable pair would be inserted into the B connector along with the wire from the home and then crimped.

In the case of the aerial cable; if the was sufficient cable slack in the housing; that same as the beehive. If there wasn't insufficient slack, the cable was cut and a piece of wire added using a B connector and then the connection was made as in the beehive using a second B connector.

For those of us that worked with pic cable we were told to get a 2 or 3 foot piece of cable from the recycling bin and use the same colours to patch the cable as the original pair.

As time went on the number of open pairs in each of these cables resulted in a rethink, and hard terminals were brought back. Many cables were in such poor shape that they were replaced, not repaired. Until the cables were replaced many phones were operating on split pairs; one good wire from one pair and a good wire from a different pair.

Rick.


xbell

@cgocable.net
Here are the scotchlocks that have been in use for at least since the 70s. The B connectors were still in use by some older techs in the 80s who wouldn't get with the times and are still in use by alarm guys today.

There are still plenty of pic terminals out there. But I haven't worked in a pic crossbox in years. The scariest one I ever got into was in Silicone Valley near the SF airport where 2 techs and I stood there afraid to touch anything.

OP: That QBB will last as long as a protector outside which the newer techs never install properly anyways. From the looks of the old outline you had an old prot in an aluminum encased box. Correct?

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to KillBell
said by KillBell :

It's a Bell pole. A tech spent two hours outside and the only visible sign of his work was the yellow band he put around the pole.

Want pics?

»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/84···le1.jpg/
»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/20···le2.jpg/
»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/98···le3.jpg/
»imageshack.us/photo/my-images/26···le4.jpg/

It all started because of the bloody pole and that's the only thing still left untouched.

sounds like my street, in 2010 hydro replaced all the poles on my street, bell and hydro have moved their wires, but videotron is still on the old poles that are cut off at the height of the videotron cables


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8
reply to KillBell
Do me a favour...open the door of the qbb block and take a picture of the wires inside...I am curious.


KillBell

@videotron.ca
Many many years ago (How many? I don't know) Bell installed a big aluminium box on the outside and connected a wire to it.

Later (When? I don't know) they installed another external wire and a grey plastic demarcation box.

From that box, they ran a white indoor-type wire on the house exterior siding up to the 2nd floor to connect it to the inside wiring. But only to one single telephone jack (As I realized just recently).

Since I had only one phone # and 6 other operational jacks I must assume these were connected to the other one through the outside of the house.

When the top-notch Bell techie cut the two black outside wires and removed the two demarcation boxes he severed my local loop.

Then the trainee and his trainer came to install the QBB to reconnect the two segments of the loop together.

Just a succession of lousy and lousier jobs. Tell me, who among the posters above would enjoy to have such an adornment to his house?

said by Glen1:

Do me a favour...open the door of the qbb block and take a picture of the wires inside...I am curious.

As soon as I'll have properly rewired the inside and repaired the damage outside...