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pumarjr

join:2010-01-17
Key West, FL

Take a Look

Can anyone here verify these stats as being optimal?







Jabbu
Premium
join:2002-03-06

Very optimal.


pumarjr

join:2010-01-17
Key West, FL
reply to pumarjr

Ok thank you, I was not sure if it was. When I try to find out from comcast they seem to have a hard time understanding what I'm trying to tell them or ask. I do alot of online gaming an I am after those really ping numbers, short of being right next to my node, what I have now is pretty much the best it'll get I can assume? Also, my connection is only about 30' from the utility pole, and I have two purpose put splitters in line so that the signal is knocked down a bit. If not splitters were in place my powerlevel on my downstream goes to 14dbmv and above, but my upstream powerlevel goes down at the same time.



Jabbu
Premium
join:2002-03-06

Signal wise, your golden. If you have two splitters to bring the signal down, right now you could remove one and be fine. It will not make a speed/ping/bandwidth difference and were you are at is good in case levels change in the future, you got room for it go + or -.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast
reply to pumarjr

Your last-mile connection appears to be perfect, or close thereto. As far as speeds go, as long as signals are good, being closer to the node isn't going to change anything...it's all a shared system anyway and this is cable, not DSL.

As far as latency goes, unless you've got crap plant that leads to congestion, jitter and dropouts (not the case here), the latency you're seeing is as good as it's gonna get with HFC (unless you're the only one on the system...which ain't gonna happen).

Any high ping you're getting in games, assuming you aren't maxing out the connection in the background downloading/uploading stuff, would be due to how Comcast routes packets on their core network or...surprise...the finite speed of light coupled with geography. The servers of one game I play regularly, League of Legends, are all clustered in a data center in Los Angeles and connected to the 'net via InterNAP. As a result, sitting on Comcast in Denver will yield pings of ~60ms, when my network hardware isn't acting up (so I'm fine most of the time). On Comcast in Florida, packets take a different network path and have more territory to traverse, so we're looking at 90ms, which is less than ideal but still playable. If I didn't like that kind of latency, I'd have to actually or virtually (via judicious use of tunneling) switch ISPs.

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