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PrivacyExprt

join:2010-09-29
Longwood, FL

4 edits

2 recommendations

Your home deadbolt/locks are totally ineffective.

Consulting with a variety of potentially 'targeted' people has taught me a lot. One of the things I learned was 'their' ability to literally walk right into 90% of the homes in America, leaving no trace of their access. I have some personal experience with this (in the past), for example I have had things 'replaced' while we were gone, in attempts to 'intimidate' me or make me insane, with absolutely no signs of forced entry. (and I stress this was years ago) Such as replacing my Maxwell House coffee with Folgers, or replacing the toothpaste with a different brand. Pretty intimidating when this happens, right? Nevertheless..

What I learned is, there has been a direct suppression of how ineffective the average home locks are for well over half a century.. In fact, they are a JOKE. So much of a joke, that it should scare you.. They work hard to keep this awareness away from folks, now it's time to expose it all. First some facts;

1) ALL of the locks sold at Big Box stores are ineffective, and in most cases, 100% compromised.

2) Smart-Key locks can be compromised in 1-5 seconds. Smartkey is roughly 75% of the keys sold to the public now, and that is scary. Of course it gives them VERY easy access to all of the homes in America that have them.

3) Kwikset brand, which is on the most homes, has the weakest defense. Across the board a worthless lock.

4) The vast majority of locks in use are bumpable. Totally ineffective home protection.

5) MOST deadbolts don't have pick-guards, so you can slip a very fine pick into the top, and open them.

Most importantly; Insurance WILL NOT cover anything in your home missing without forced entry evidence. Police will place you immediately as a suspect.

Alarmed yet? Allow me to explain..

Smartkey which is the latest lie being sold consumers is a scam, it's basically a method so you can 'electronically' instantly rekey your lock as needed. The problem is, anyone that wants in can use a tool that reconfigures your lock in 1-5 seconds.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=nF4wbyJ5···=related


A bit about how keys work.. Keys are 'coded' for length, and depth. Kwikset uses a 5 digit code, and only goes down to 6 on depth. Which means they are easier to pick and/or bump. So a Kwikset key might look like 43134. The deeper the cut, the harder the bump. Better brands of locks use longer pin layouts, and deeper cuts. Locks sold at Big Box stores generally have poor pin layouts, and shallow cuts. They also 'regionally' share pin layouts with a maximum of 10,000 worldwide combinations possible, but possibly as few as 1,000 regionally depending on company.

The third major issue is something in the 'biz' called 'bumping', the spooks/govt loves this one, and has worked hard to keep awareness of this low. An agent spilled the beans on this a few years ago, and the internet lit up about it. Essentially you just file down a key to a blank, then 'bump' it into the lock to knock the pins upward, setting loose the lock. You can even buy bump-sets for all major lock brands (link withheld). 3:43 into this video, he shows how blazingly fast entry into a home is (undetected).

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwTVBWCijEQ


For a couple years the big name lock companies made 'unpickable' locks. Schlage made Primus, it was so unpickable, the engineer that designed it took 2 MONTHS to circumvent it. It was too good, it was pulled off the market without explanation. There are 'big name' more secure locks, but they are expensive, running $130-$300 price ranges. (Medeco, etc)

Let's stop with the horror stories and discuss solutions! Thankfully, you can fix your situation with very little money.. Remember to pay for this stuff with cash, don't fill out any information.

Solutions;

1) Go to a locksmith store, find the Schlage B60 or equivalent, usually $30-$50. Have the pins inside replaced with Mushroom Pins, which will prevent 'bumping'. Basically mushroom pins have a mushroom top, when bumped fall to the side grabbing it, and defeating the bump. Then have it re-pinned for a deeper, more complex keyset, the deeper/complex the pin layout, the harder to pick/bump. (6,4,9,5,7,9 or something) These come with anti-drilling protections, pick shields, and will suffice for the majority of cases. I know expert locksmiths that spend days and days in the shop trying to get through these. They aren't impossible to get into, but offer some pretty significant protection at a low price. OR buy them, then take them into the locksmith store, have ALL mushroom pins installed, and rekeyed to be higher security.
»www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Deadbolt-Sc···b4dd38d1

2) Purchase Medeco locks, or a similar high security brand. These are fairly secure, although not impossible to break, and nobody can just go get a key made. They come with a credit card that has to be used at a locksmith to 'authorize' a rekey job. But these cost $120-$300 depending on model. Also, when an agent, crook, or anyone else sees Medeco on the door, they think "This dude knows about security..", it's an alarm bell for them, they get scared, they don't know what ELSE you might have..
»www.ebay.com/itm/MEDECO-DEADBOLT···5d8a6139

3) Purchase Schlage Everest locks off Ebay. Only pro locksmiths can make keys for these, and they are extremely hard to break into. They do not make them anymore, so any you find will be ones before production was stopped. They have side pins that prevent most picking, and prevent bumpjobs. Cost is quite low, about $50-$70 each on Ebay.
»www.ebay.com/itm/SCHLAGE-EVEREST···2wt_1163

There you have it.. This information needs to be out there so the public can get informed, and protected. Especially with the way our govt. is going, I think beefed up security is crucial these days. The news has been running a story about a girl that disappeared recently, the parents are prime suspects because the home had no signs of forced entry. Try telling a cop, or insurance agent, that someone 'bumped' your lock open in 5 seconds, and they won't believe you. So having high security locks is a wise decision IMO.


Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

As a side note, a few months ago, I needed to replace the lockset for a friend who was afraid someone they knew had made a key to their mobile home. A trip to Lowe's, Home Depot, and a few other such stores revealed a rather interesting (and troubling) point: in each store, the several brands of locksets available were all keyed identically within brands on the shelves... that is, all the Schlages had the same key pattern across a particular style/color. Ditto for each of the other brands: Kwikset, etc. Meaning, everyone who bought a particular brand lockset off that same shelf within a given timeframe (until the lot-code was exhausted) would have the very same key... and in one "builder's" store, that meant every one of the 17 Schlage locksets on the shelf that I personally checked had exactly the same key pattern.

It makes me suspect that the "efficient" way these are now being made by most of the lock makers is to produce an entire run (or at least an entire lot-code) with exactly the same key pattern, then select another pattern for the next run. But, of course, when a lot-coded carton of locksets goes to a store, all the locks will be keyed the same. Apparently this doesn't seem to trouble anybody in the product loops, but I do know this is not how things used to be several years ago.
--
"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" -- P.Henry, 1775


PrivacyExprt

join:2010-09-29
Longwood, FL

1 recommendation

That is correct, keen observation.

Worse, an entire region might have only '1000' total, over the entire history of the product line. So basically it means everyone purchasing them at Home Depot, for a solid year, all have the same keys unless they've had them rekeyed.

Smartkey is the latest rage, and you can see how silly and useless that is. A $9.00 tool off Ebay opens those in a second. These are complete garbage, and a DREAM for a govt. run amok that wants their ops inside of any home in America within seconds. The most nefarious part? Bumping, or Smartkey LOOKS like the guy already has a key, and is just a person 'checking on your home' that you asked to do it. They literally have a key, or what looks like a key, and spend a mere second outside your door. Nobody ever suspects a thing.. Smartkey units all have a cut little 'punched' icon, very small, right on the cylinder, so anyone doesn't really need to guess if you have one from the outside of your home.. How cool is that?

Raising public awareness of this is crucial IMO. The lock industry has been in bed with the cartels for too long, duping the public.


TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:2
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel

1 recommendation

reply to PrivacyExprt

Locks only keep the opportunists out.

This is why we have an alarm system. I have also been considering getting cameras for outdoors, as well as inside the front entrance and other potential points of entry. Although I don't know if I should bother, break-ins are rare in this area.



hayc59
Im Your Huckleberry
Premium
join:2001-02-26
David R.I.P.
kudos:21

2 recommendations

reply to PrivacyExprt

This is exactly why I have two
very good friends and their names are
Mossberg FLEX 590
Smith & Wesson Shield


PrivacyExprt

join:2010-09-29
Longwood, FL

1 recommendation

reply to TheMG

said by TheMG:

Locks only keep the opportunists out.

This is why we have an alarm system. I have also been considering getting cameras for outdoors, as well as inside the front entrance and other potential points of entry. Although I don't know if I should bother, break-ins are rare in this area.

90%+ of all locks keep NOBODY OUT, that was the point.. Even opportunists that have half a brain can quickly walk through most locks. Remember, you can buy bumpkeys for 90% of all locks for $8.00 for a complete set on the internet. This ensures 1-5 second entry to virtually all homes.
»www.bumpkeyaz.com/The-Mini-Start···-MS3.htm

But I agree, a good alarm system, and CCD's are great. I have CCD's covering my front porch, back porch, and backyard on a 500 hour DVR. This is a very safe low crime area, but you'd be surprised at how people 'keep in line' when they know you are filming. This is basically turning their technology against them, for your benefit. Another handy thing, if the cops or spooks happen to show up for this or that reason, then you have a audio/visual record of the entire encounter, and cops really hate video cameras.

My buddies wife got mad at him, called the cops saying he threatened her (untrue), they showed up, asked him to come out. Innocent of everything he went out, they asked him to come to the 'side' of the home away from anyones view. He did, and they immediately jumped him to beat the snot out of him. What they didn't realize is he had his son setup to observe the encounter, and once they saw him they immediately stopped, and shortly thereafter left the scene. Later through research, WE found out these cops all have recording devices on them they always 'forget' to turn on, and the they aim their squad cars AWAY from the location they are going so there is no visual record of what they do. Well with CCD's, that problem is solved, it's all caught on camera, they have to behave like good little boys and girls.

Layered defense, but if your locks suck, it's like not having a firewall for your PC, seriously.


therube

join:2004-11-11
Randallstown, MD

1 recommendation

reply to TheMG

> Locks only keep the opportunists out.

Right. Just enough to keep the ex from coming in the door .

A number of years back, traded in one Ford (Econoline) Van for another. At the time (70's or so) they used those Z shaped (I call them) keys. One day I found a spare from the old van in my drawer. Tried it in the new van, & it worked . The vehicle keys were close enough that inserted one side up, the old key could be used for the new van. I liked that. Put a dab of glue on the "up" side, making it convenient to use .

All "lock" stories are old news, Kryptonite Evolution 2000 U- Lock hacked by a Bic pen.


Finnn

@dnainternet.fi

Simply use Abloy lock as main lock and Boda as extra security lock. Those are extremely tought to pick, basically impossible. There hasnt been any known cases in Finland, where such lock where picked and someone gain access to somewhere they shouldnt have. Yes, you read that right.

Thats why they broke into homes by breaking doors or windows btw.



NameRequirem

@sonic.net

"Simply use Abloy lock as main lock and Boda as extra security lock. Those are extremely tought to pick, basically impossible"

How to open Abloy Protec cylinder lock - YouTube

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=uj4myR2XlWc


Pick lock Abloy 900

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOacNkOgA5c


Boda 5 pin picked

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDHsi8zUjg0

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:2

said by NameRequirem :

How to open Abloy Protec cylinder lock - YouTube

That is not lock picking, that's lock drilling.

PrivacyExprt

join:2010-09-29
Longwood, FL
reply to PrivacyExprt

Even Shalage Primus can be picked. The engineer that designed it, took 2 months to pick one in his lab. Every lock is pickable, given the right conditions. Even those tube key Israeli ones with insane protections, can still be picked.

The difference is; the vast majority of locks in use in this country are pickable/bumpable in 1-3 seconds. Reasonable upgrades to these, require the right tools, a trained well practiced expert, and up to 1-3 hours in some cases. Not practical to do it on someones door, in front of the neighbors, etc.

Hehe.



Finnnn

@dnainternet.fi
reply to PrivacyExprt

Yes, you can drill any lock. But not pick (not efficiently atleast). Besides, thats not the current Abloy lock standard.

That was not the Boda lock btw. This is Boda lock I was talking about
»www.okidoki.ee/item/470303/

Mod Note: Link fixed. --kc



big ragu

@bhn.net
reply to PrivacyExprt

you can at least be sure nobody can get in while you are there by using a non-keyed lock, like a chain lock, or a security bar on the door



jabarnut
Light Years Away
Premium,MVM
join:2005-01-22
Galaxy M31
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to hayc59

said by hayc59:

This is exactly why I have two
very good friends and their names are
Mossberg FLEX 590
Smith & Wesson Shield

Yep. I only have one friend and his name is Sig P226. He likes his 20 round magazine loaded with hollow points with him at all times.
Even the best of locks obviously won't keep some of the lunatics out there from breaking in to your house.
And that's when my friend 'Sig' gets really mad.
Of course, when nobody is home that's a different story. But again, if someone *really* wants to break in, they can and will.
--
I had a life once.....now I have a Computer and a Modem.

HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Suddenlink

What does your friend "Sig" do to protect your belongings when you aren't home? Point and click defense only works when you're physically present to point and click.



Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

1 recommendation

reply to PrivacyExprt

Weekday... typical empty suburban neighborhood... owner gone... woodframe house... vinyl siding... one portable Sawzall, a sharp blade, and they're in through a hole cut through a wall. No bump keys, picks, or slide-hammer pullers required... and the lock style or brand doesn't matter a bit, even window bars won't work, nor will the typical entry-point alarm systems. Show up in a white tradesman van, and anybody who still might drive by will think you're a repairman.

The truth is that if somebody wants to break into an unoccupied home, they can - and they do, daily. All the barriers and locks that are erected are merely discouragements to try to send "them" on down the road to lower-hanging fruit. But they don't always work against someone more determined. Just something to keep one's perspective in this very insecure world...
--
"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" -- P.Henry, 1775



jabarnut
Light Years Away
Premium,MVM
join:2005-01-22
Galaxy M31
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to HarryH3

Quite true. My friend Sig is pretty useless when I'm not home. (Like I mentioned)

said by jabarnut:

....
Of course, when nobody is home that's a different story. But again, if someone *really* wants to break in, they can and will.

And really, the fanciest locks in the world might make you feel a little better, but the old tried and true 'forced entry' will generally work.
Sort of like the ol' "If you outlaw guns, only outlaws will have guns" thing. Good locks will probably only keep the more honest thieves out.
On second thought, never mind. Not so sure there is such a thing as an "honest thief". (Not to mention that was a pretty poor analogy).
--
I had a life once.....now I have a Computer and a Modem.


MacGyver
Don't Waste Your Energy
Premium,ExMod 2003-05
join:2001-10-14
Canada
kudos:2
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·TekSavvy DSL

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to Blackbird

said by Blackbird:

The truth is that if somebody wants to break into an unoccupied home, they can - and they do, daily.

I came to the same conclusion when shopping for new locks when we last moved. I could buy very good locks, but somebody could still get in by smashing a window. I settled for having the existing Schlage locks rekeyed with a custom 6-pin combination from a locksmith that would be difficult to bump. I took the cylinders to the locksmith and had it done for $11 per cylinder which was much cheaper than new locks.

Also every house I've bought had different keys for every door - which drives me crazy.


jabarnut
Light Years Away
Premium,MVM
join:2005-01-22
Galaxy M31
kudos:2
reply to PrivacyExprt

Yeah, I was thinking about this some more..like how could my home ever be truly 'secure'? For the average person, it really can't.
As Blackbird See Profile mentioned, if someone is determined enough, they can and will break in.
The only thing I can think of is something like you see in the movies.
Ya know, like the multi million dollar home some drug cartel guy might own?
Not only Surveillance cameras and monitoring of every square inch of the property, and the most elaborate alarm and security systems available, but those guards posted all over the place 24 hours a day with automatic weapons would do wonders to deter thieves.
The rest of us? We just have to take our chances and hope for the best, I suppose.
--
I had a life once.....now I have a Computer and a Modem.


PrivacyExprt

join:2010-09-29
Longwood, FL
reply to PrivacyExprt

You have to remember, we are talking about walking into 90% of the homes in America, in 1-5 seconds, with an 8$ set of blanks. This voids all insurances, and cops automatically view you as a suspect. Forced entry is an entirely different subject, and is covered by insurance, and police view this entirely differently.

Lets face it, unless you have some good locks, with some measures I posted, then you can be compromised in 1-5 seconds by virtually anyone with even 1/4 of a brain. I have a video of a 7 year old girl bumping a lock that represents 90% of the ones installed on homes. If you use securekey, or comparable products, the situation is even worse.. I think a lot of folks are realizing they have compromised locks, and making excuses.

There are still methods, very cheap ones to prevent SOME forced entry. For example a very low cost 'film' can be placed on the inside of windows making them hammer proof, projectile proof, virtually unbreakable. This stuff used to be really expensive, now it's pennies a foot and takes half a day to install on all of your ground floor windows, and door windows.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYdVK3BqPfk


First one is normal glass, second is the security film.. Stunning isn't it? Remember, easy to install, virtually unbreakable.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=Limvx3D-···=related


Woody79_00
I run Linux am I still a PC?
Premium
join:2004-07-08
united state
reply to PrivacyExprt

With all due respect, this is a waste..the average doorlock you buy at Lowes, etc are not meant to keep people out.

ever heard the phase "Locks only keep honest people out" that phrase can never be more true.

the BEST lock on your home is a dog...2 is even better.

I have two Dogs, 1 is a mix between a Pittbull and a Rottweiler, the other is a pure breed Rotweiler...

I dare some schmuck to enter my house when im not home...he will get eaten up...Dogs can be trained, and its not that difficult...it just takes a little bit of time...they will attack on command if i order them to, they will also back off,m stay down, lie on the floor, etc on command.

Everyday before i leave for work i tell them "if anyone breaks in sic em" and the dogs reply with a bark and nodding of their heads....dogs are smarter then people give them credit for.

one person thought about trying to break in late one night but the doigs scared him off....plus two dogs like the is a GREAT defense against Home Invasions because Dogs will known the perps are outside well before they ever cut any phone lines or anything...in fact...the presense of suck dogs will probably deter 9 out of 10 home invasions due to the fact of un forseen complications of having to deal with multiple guard/attack dogs was not in their plans and may be much more then they bargain for. It also increases the risk, draws too much attention to them, noise factor, etc

the best locks on your house are well trained dogs...



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3

I keep an angry Mother-In-Law in the house so I'm good to go.

Dave



El Quintron
Resident Mouth Breather
Premium
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Etobicoke, ON
kudos:4
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TekSavvy DSL

said by workablob:

I keep an angry Mother-In-Law in the house so I'm good to go.

Dave

LOL... I assumed you used the locks to her out, not in.
--
Everything in moderation... Including Moderation --Oscar Wilde

Simple Guy

join:2012-05-16

Lots of great posts in this thread!

Generally speaking one of the greatest deterrents to a person wishing to gain unauthorized entrance to a "guarded location" is exposure to others while or when they break in.

Exposure is usually expressed by the time, (how long), it takes them to gain entrance, their visibility to others, or the attraction they create by breaking in--sound of breaking something, etc.

The above principles apply disproportionately to the motives or the skills of the perspective intruder.



ROCINANTE
Original Member 007
Premium
join:1999-06-29
Hartsdale, NY

Many burglars are drug addicts who do not care about being detected in middle class neighborhoods. They will smash a door or a patio window and turn the locks. How does a secure lock protect you in this case?
--
CRUNCH THIS!



rcdailey
Dragoonfly
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Rialto, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

1 edit

Exactly. I experienced that about 20 years ago. Home had a deadbolt on the front door, with no window in the door. Burglar(s) smashed the door in, breaking the jamb. No problem and the neighbors heard and saw nothing at the time. It was reported later to the police and they were waiting for us (for me and my wife) when we got back from a trip. No cell phones at the time, so we didn't know. It's not as if they could not have smashed the patio door, too, but it was just easier to bust in from the front. To go in the back would have required cutting the lock on the side gate or scaling the wall. That would have taken longer.

It's a little more hazardous for thieves these days due to more surveillance cameras even in residential areas and more alarm systems installed, etc. Still, we have home invasions and burglaries anyway.

--
It is easier for a camel to put on a bikini than an old man to thread a needle.



rcdailey
Dragoonfly
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Rialto, CA
reply to jabarnut

Rather than "honest," substitute "careful."


JoelC707
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Lanett, AL
kudos:5
reply to ROCINANTE

said by ROCINANTE:

Many burglars are drug addicts who do not care about being detected in middle class neighborhoods. They will smash a door or a patio window and turn the locks. How does a secure lock protect you in this case?

What you and so many others missed in this thread is that this isn't about breaking in, in general. It's about preventing them from taking the easy way out and making them break something to get in. It's about forced entry. No, a secure lock won't prevent a burglar from smashing the window next to the door and flipping the lock on the inside, that's not the point. The point is that is then forced entry and that changes the game.

Here's what you're giving a burglar:
Home with insecure lock + uncoated window next to door - smash window (forced entry), pick lock (unforced entry)
Home with secure lock + uncoated window - smash window (forced entry)
Home with secure lock + coated window + wood framing - Cut hole in house (forced entry), bust down door (forced entry)

The goal is to make them resort to forced entry if they still insist on breaking in to your house. With the ultimate goal being to make them pick an easier target and leave your house alone. Yes, technically picking a lock is forced entry but unless they damage the lock, there is usually no evidence left behind and it becomes much harder to prove someone broke in and burglarized your house.

FWIW, I've never liked the chains on doors either. Usually those are secured to the trim around the door frame with short screws. If someone were to pick the lock and were met with a chain, one good kick and the screws will rip out and/or the trim piece will come off the frame (finish nails have a narrow head, won't hold it on that well). Of course a security conscious person would use longer screws that make it to the framing. It'd take more effort but you could still rip off the slide on the door itself.

PrivacyExprt

join:2010-09-29
Longwood, FL

said by JoelC707:

said by ROCINANTE:

Many burglars are drug addicts who do not care about being detected in middle class neighborhoods. They will smash a door or a patio window and turn the locks. How does a secure lock protect you in this case?

What you and so many others missed in this thread is that this isn't about breaking in, in general. It's about preventing them from taking the easy way out and making them break something to get in. It's about forced entry. No, a secure lock won't prevent a burglar from smashing the window next to the door and flipping the lock on the inside, that's not the point. The point is that is then forced entry and that changes the game.

Here's what you're giving a burglar:
Home with insecure lock + uncoated window next to door - smash window (forced entry), pick lock (unforced entry)
Home with secure lock + uncoated window - smash window (forced entry)
Home with secure lock + coated window + wood framing - Cut hole in house (forced entry), bust down door (forced entry)

The goal is to make them resort to forced entry if they still insist on breaking in to your house. With the ultimate goal being to make them pick an easier target and leave your house alone. Yes, technically picking a lock is forced entry but unless they damage the lock, there is usually no evidence left behind and it becomes much harder to prove someone broke in and burglarized your house.

You sir, are an exception and your post is perfectly worded to express the point of this thread. I'm quite shocked so many people just don't seem to understand the core message here.

Dogs are pretty good, but then what about when you leave town and stash the dog in a kennel, or with relatives? Also dogs aren't practical for everyone, especially big smelly ones that make good guard dogs. That little hotdog isn't going to help when someone bump's into your side door, a swift kick and it's flying against the wall with a broken back.

Remember, no forced entry means you are the prime suspect, and your insurance is invalid. That's the important thing here.


jabarnut
Light Years Away
Premium,MVM
join:2005-01-22
Galaxy M31
kudos:2

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to PrivacyExprt

said by PrivacyExprt:

....
I'm quite shocked so many people just don't seem to understand the core message here either.
...

And I'm quite shocked you don't seem to get the 'core' message.
The real message is (especially these days), people who really want to break into your house don't give a crap about 'secure locks' on the doors. If they want to break into your house, they will. And if they need money for drugs, or some other desperate reason, they'll do whatever they can to get in. I suspect the days of people who can't easily pick your door lock don't simply say: "Aw heck, can't get into this place because they have fancy door locks, guess I'll just try another place", are long over.
Fine...I'll put some fancy locks on my doors. You think that will make me feel any more secure? Nope. They don't give a damn while breaking in if they may be a 'prime suspect', of if their actions can somehow be traced.. They aren't thinking about any laws at all...they're just thinking about how they can get in and steal your belongings...no matter what it takes. And hey, if the police want to make me a 'prime suspect' , more power to them. Yeah, I really pulled a fast one on them, eh? Having someone steal all of my favorite stuff so I can collect some insurance money? I'll be more than happy to have them prove it.
Either my fully loaded 9MM (when I'm home), will make me feel secure, or those armed guards with automatic weapons posted 24 house a day like I mentioned before will help to make me feel 'secure'. Other than that, nothing is 'secure'.
Perhaps you work for some company who sells fancy 'secure' door locks?
--
I had a life once.....now I have a Computer and a Modem.