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Jammers

join:2009-01-15
Tillamook, OR

New routers handling IPv6

Can all new routers handle IPv6 even though it may take years for it to finally replace IPv4?



Cabal
Premium
join:2007-01-21
Reviews:
·Suddenlink

1 recommendation

I can't speak for *every* new router out there, but all the latest from the major manufacturers seem to support it (Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, Trendnet (bleh), Buffalo, etc). If in doubt, check the specs.
--
If you can't open it, you don't own it.



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
reply to Jammers

The Buffalo's don't support DHCP6-PD. So axe that from your list.



PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to Jammers

Most recent models do, but as previously mentioned, check the specs...easy enough to do. At this point in time there is not a lot of reason to buy a new router that is not IPv6 enabled.

The router that I mentioned to you in your other thread asking about routers (Linksys EA2700) is IPv6 enabled.
--
Deeds, not words



Da Geek Kid

join:2003-10-11
::1
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

reply to Jammers

It really depends on what you mean by "handle"...

most routers maybe able to process IPv6, but due to it's sheer size each packet needs to be processed multiple times unless the router has a 128bit processor. So because of that almost all the Consumer grade routers would be able to handle at half the performance in full stream. So your Gig performance should be in around 400mbps or lower range... but if you load a 4 port router and attempt to push/pull on all ports let's a 4gig file, the performance will degrade to single mbps.



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

Where are you getting this from?



Da Geek Kid

join:2003-10-11
::1
kudos:1

from performance testing netgear, linksys


IamGimli

join:2004-02-28
Canada
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Jammers

Consumer-grade routers mostly all have some level of IPv6 support but I haven't seen a single one that supports it natively, i.e. where all functions are designed for IPv6.

Current generation will support a hybrid environment where some IPv6 is present, but I don't think any of them will completely work in a pure IPv6 environment.


Jammers

join:2009-01-15
Tillamook, OR

If IPv6 is already being transitioned from IPv4 why wouldn't the companies that make routers start building them to support IPv6 natively? Seems ridiculous not to start now.


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9

People have been saying that for a decade now.



PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to Jammers

said by Jammers:

If IPv6 is already being transitioned from IPv4 why wouldn't the companies that make routers start building them to support IPv6 natively? Seems ridiculous not to start now.

Misleading. Current routers do handle IPv6. Of course they are a hybrid! IPv4 is not going away anytime soon, so continuing IPv4 support as well is common sense. Besides which, having IPv4 support does not compromise IPv6 functionality.
--
Deeds, not words


Da Geek Kid

join:2003-10-11
::1
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Callcentric

Misleading. Routers handling IPv6 is NOT compared to IPv4 handling. The hardware enabled IPv6 is years away for consumers so NO Jammers See Profile comment is NOT misleading.



PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by Da Geek Kid:

Misleading. Routers handling IPv6 is NOT compared to IPv4 handling. The hardware enabled IPv6 is years away for consumers so NO Jammers See Profile comment is NOT misleading.

Here is Jammers question again: "...why wouldn't the companies that make routers start building them to support IPv6 natively?"

The answer is that yes, they do make consumer routers which support IPv6 natively.

Again, IPv4 isn't going anywhere, anytime soon, so it would be foolish for a consumer router manufacturer not to incorporate both.
--
Deeds, not words


Da Geek Kid

join:2003-10-11
::1
kudos:1

no one is questioning IPv4... Natively, is in hardware. Please let me know which consumer grade router provides IPv6, natively.

In software is NOT Native.


quesix

join:2005-12-19
Cary, IL
reply to Jammers

new Cisco Linksys E1200 Wireless-N router out of box (hardware version 2) came with 2.00.01 code PPPoE only got single IPv6 address, had to upgrade to 2.00.02 code to get DHCP-PD to work. works without any configuration on linksys router after that. It also seems to support 6RD (for you AT&T users come July 2012) if you have prefix and IP of server.

In my test case, I am assigning ::/128 address to WAN via PPP (Dual Stack mode), and ::/56 to LAN, of course i'm guessing it just uses first ::/64.


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9

2 recommendations

reply to Da Geek Kid

"native" does not mean "in hardware". No consumer level hardware does any layer 3 protocol in hardware. In this sense, "native" means the manufacturer ships the device with support for IPv6 -- you don't have to hack around with 3rd party software or download experimental (often buggy) firmware from the manufacturer. Likewise, "native" when talking about your ISP does not mean "in hardware", but "without yet another tunneling technology." (native as in "not requiring IPv4")

Carrier (and enterprise) gear with support for IPv6 switching in hardware has been around for several generations. Even my eBay surplus Nortel (now Avaya) switches have some IPv6 functions in hardware. (aging cisco gear... none.)

[note: it's becoming more common for nics to have checksum offloading capabilities, but that's only a small part of the full protocol. I don't know if or which ones support v6 checksum offloading.]



Da Geek Kid

join:2003-10-11
::1
kudos:1

As I stated no consumer h/w supports IPv6. Natively by your definition is a nonsense word. As any firmware can be updated to include IPv6 than to be called a Native IPv6.



leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

2 recommendations

I consider the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) to be good authority on all things Internet related and the term "Native IPv6" is used in a number of RFCs (including RFCs on the Standards Track).

In all such cases the meaning of the term refers to the ability to communicate using IPv6 packets without having to encapsulate and tunnel it over IPv4 (6in4, 6to4, teredo). I'm not aware of any attempt by the IETF or other standards bodies to use the term "Native IPv6" to distinguish between hardware and software implementations of the protocol.

That doesn't mean that distinguishing between hardware and software implementations isn't important but using the term "Native IPv6" for that purpose is at best confusing.
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Cabal
Premium
join:2007-01-21
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to Da Geek Kid

said by Da Geek Kid:

As I stated no consumer h/w supports IPv6. Natively by your definition is a nonsense word. As any firmware can be updated to include IPv6 than to be called a Native IPv6.

You need to re-check your buzzwords. There is no such that as IPv6 "in hardware" (in the context of consumer and enterprise hardware). Network stacks are done in the kernel, in software.
--
If you can't open it, you don't own it.

IamGimli

join:2004-02-28
Canada
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Well, I was the first one to use "natively" in this thread and I provided a definition for what "natively" means to me in this context.

I'll repeat it for clarity.

To me, in the context being discussed here, a consumer-grade router that would "natively" support IPv6 would be a consumer-grade router that can operate both in IPv4, IPv6 and hybrid environments and where all of it's functions are available, no matter the standard used.

I have yet to see a single consumer-grade router where the more advanced functions (such as firewalling, QoS, parental control, etc.) work in IPv6.

To address Jammers question as to why manufacturers aren't doing it? Cost vs. return. At this point IPv6 is such a fringe technology that they wouldn't really sell any more routers even if they did natively support IPv6, and it would be very expensive to re-write the whole code for all those routers (let alone ensure there's no degradation of performance, enough physical memory available, etc.). So they're only doing the absolute minimum to support IPv6 and they figure by the time it's necessary for them to write that code the labour required will be cheaper (more people will know how to code for IPv6 by then), the hardware will be designed for it and the consumer will be aware of it and demand it.

Plus they'll get to sell you one more router.



rchandra
Stargate Universe fan
Premium
join:2000-11-09
14225-2105

1 recommendation

reply to Jammers

I can tell you this much: there's not a lick of IPv6 in the firmware for my Netgear WGR614, but due to its merely bridging the WiFi and the Ethernet, it seems to work just fine using IPv6 over WiFi. It passes NSes, NAs, RSes, and RAs just fine, as well as the "main" traffic. However, aint never gonna be able to admin the thing over IPv6.

My "main" router is an old Linux PC, so it's quite a bit more capable in terms of IPv6.
--
English is a difficult enough language to interpret correctly when its rules are followed, let alone when a writer chooses not to follow those rules.

Jeopardy! replies and randomcaps REALLY suck!



rchandra
Stargate Universe fan
Premium
join:2000-11-09
14225-2105

1 recommendation

reply to Jammers

It's all in economics. Lack of general demand means lack of money spent on programming services to make it possible. It's classic chicken/egg. Finally with v4 address space exhaustion, there is slightly more pressure, but there won't be a lot of pressure until all the RIRs run out. (How close is ARIN anyway?)
--
English is a difficult enough language to interpret correctly when its rules are followed, let alone when a writer chooses not to follow those rules.

Jeopardy! replies and randomcaps REALLY suck!



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by rchandra:

Finally with v4 address space exhaustion, there is slightly more pressure, but there won't be a lot of pressure until all the RIRs run out. (How close is ARIN anyway?)

I think just RIPE and ARIN running out will be all the pressure that's needed. APNIC is already out.

RIPE will reach its last /8 (basically out) in Sept. Many of the remaining address will be given out for CGNs and NAT64 (transition mechanisms), so they'll essentially be out then. They've already started allocating of 5/8 which is used by Hamachi. Would suck to be getting any new IPs from them now.

»www.ripe.net/internet-coordinati···ol-graph

My guess for ARIN is Q2 of 2013 for exhaustion.
»www.arin.net/resources/request/i···own.html


kontos
xyzzy

join:2001-10-04
West Henrietta, NY

2 recommendations

reply to Da Geek Kid

said by Da Geek Kid:

no one is questioning IPv4... Natively, is in hardware. Please let me know which consumer grade router provides IPv6, natively.

In software is NOT Native.

By that definition of "Native" there are also no consumer routers that do native IPv4 either. (They all have CPUs that load firmware to do their IP stuff)
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