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PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to plencnerb

Re: Should we have a Docsis 3.0 capable modem?

said by plencnerb:

.... I take it home, swap it out with my old one, and get everything up and running. Phone does not work yet, as it takes about 3 business days to port the number over. But, that's not a big deal, and when the switch took place, I had no issues getting everything running.

The new modem I got is a Thomson Internet Voice Modem, Model # DHG536. I don't know if mine is NCS or IMS, from the list you linked to.

However, this is a D2 modem, and the list currently shows that it does not support IPv6.

So, my question then becomes this...obviously on May 18th, Comcast was less then a month (19 days to be exact) away from turning on IPv6. Why would they swap my old modem out for one that apparently does not support IPv6?

A little clarification:

First, IPv6 is not yet a must have...eventually yes, but not now, so it is not a suprise in terms of IPv6.

Second, based on where you are, several hardware packages can be available. For example, I have both internet & voice, on the performance tier, and for a self-install, Comcast sent me both the Thompson DHG536 D2 eMTA along with the Cisco DPC3008 (Docsis 3.0) modem. That was too much signal splitting for my set up, so I called them and they cheerfully swapped the D2 eMTA and D3 modem for a D3 eMTA.

I suspect that if you ask...even if it may take a little "push"...you can probably get a D3 eMTA sent out. Sometimes, it is all a matter of which "account executive" you talk to...

An alternative, is if you have a local Comcast office, bring in your D2 eMTA and push for a swap. There is nothing wrong with the D2 thompson, but, if you are in a Docsis 3.0 area, you really want the channel bonding that a D3 modem/eMTA provides.
--
Deeds, not words

bgoodbody
Bill G

join:2002-05-08
North Truro, MA
reply to m29a
»mydeviceinfo.comcast.net/

This tells what comcast say you should have

Blast = D3
--
- Bill


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
reply to PeteC2
I have the triple play (Comcast TV, Comcast Digital Voice, and Comcast Internet, at the Performance level). I do agree that a modem that supports IPv6 right now is not a "must have" but a "nice to" have. I was just thinking ahead, and if the modem I have would support it or not without having to swap it out later.

I also agree that the modem I have is great. It was easy to setup, and so far, has not given me any issues.

Since you indicated you were able to take both your modems and have them swap them out for a D3 eMTA, I don't see why I could not go down to my local office and do the same. If you don't mind me asking, which D3 eMTA did you get? This way, I can ask for a specific one (if they have it).

Also, how do I know if I'm in a Docsis 3.0 area? Is there a link that I can check to see?

Thanks in advance for all the info!

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
reply to plencnerb
No what I was saying was I'm not aware of any D3 voice modems that Comcast offers, but that they may and I could be wrong. One option you could go with would be to rent a D3 modem and rent a D2 voice modem if you could afford it, but another option would be to own your own D3 modem and just rent the D2 voice modem. Idealistically owning your own D3 voice modem would be best but that being a viable option doesn't seem possible quite yet. Yes you would need to split the data line between the two modems. Personally in my own house I have one line that goes into the basement that connects to a two way splitter, one line goes to the modem and the other line goes into a four way splitter. I agree that its sort of a pain in the ass to have two physical modems and I know that Motorola makes D3 voice modems »www.motorola.com/Video-Solutions···e-Modems but can't find it easily for sale legitimately. In my experience just because a modem is on the approved list or that it is available for purchase doesn't mean Comcast is required to activate it or if its a very new product even able to activate it.


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
reply to NathanO
true but the majority of manufacturers seem to abandon creating the new firmware to support the older modems (so you buy their new one) or the ISP simply don't roll out the new firmware to support it because they want customers to use new modems do to the benefits of what D3 offers.


PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to plencnerb
said by plencnerb:

I do agree that a modem that supports IPv6 right now is not a "must have" but a "nice to" have.

Since you indicated you were able to take both your modems and have them swap them out for a D3 eMTA, I don't see why I could not go down to my local office and do the same. If you don't mind me asking, which D3 eMTA did you get? This way, I can ask for a specific one (if they have it).

Also, how do I know if I'm in a Docsis 3.0 area? Is there a link that I can check to see?

I do agree, its nice to have the compatibility right up front, just saying that IPv6 would not be the driving force behind what Comcast sends out...yet anyway.

Comcast sent me the Arris TM722G eMTA, though I understand they also have other D3 eMTAs. Do not go for a wireless gateway D3 eMTA...unless you have them bridge it, and you use your own router.

Many if not most areas are now Docsis 3.0. An easy way to tell if your area is, would be if the Extreme tiers are offered in your area, as they only operate under Docsis 3.0
--
Deeds, not words

m29a

join:2012-06-10
Indiana, PA

1 edit
Okay we just swapped our TM502G for a TM702G and speeds have went from 30/2 to 35/5. So wow there is a bit of a difference in terms of switching from a D2 to a D3, this is on the Blast! tier however.


PGHammer

join:2003-06-09
Accokeek, MD
reply to m29a
said by m29a:

In september we upgraded from Performance speed tier to Blast! and we still have the old modem which is the Arris TM502G. I have read threads on the forums that have said that if you are on the Blast tier or above, you should have a DOCSIS 3.0 capable modem. Well today we tried to call and the guy said we go to speedtest and test our connection. The problem is, since we upgraded from Performance to Blast the speed has been the same ever since. And also I would think we should have a Docsis 3.0 capable modem considering we are no longer on the Performance speed internet tier. I thought that maybe it's because we are still using the same modem ever since. Can anyone give some information on this?

You should upgrade to D3 anyway - Blast tier or not. I did over a year ago, and I'm still on the Performance tier. The increased performance (and connection reliability) afforded by channel bonding are SO worth it.


SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS
If you are renting a modem sure why not, other than it's a waste of time and gas.

Don't rush out and buy a D3 if you are not on blast. The increased performance is called power boost, it's not sustained and is only for the first 20MB on the performance tier.

AS far as connection reliability, quality of signal is the contributing factor there.


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
I agree with PGHammer See Profile ! There is no doubt about the increased capacity / reduced congestion benefits of having multiple bonded channels. The bigger pipe helps to insure that all of the users who share the cable segment / node will receive their subscribed to speeds even during times of peak usage. It's a win win for both the customer and the provider.


SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA

3 edits
Sorry, I read that economy and performance do not use multiple bonded channels like Blast does.

So, what you are saying is that with the economy tier I would get channel bonding with a D3 modem?


SHoTTa35

@optonline.net
It's not done by tier, it's just a network function. That's like saying you only subscribe to 10Mbps plan so your modem would change the speed of it's WAN port to max out at 10Mbps instead of 1Gbps or even 100Mbps. It doesn't work that way.

The configuration file that's downloaded to your modem is what tells the modem what your limit is and it uses that information to control how fast it allows data. If the CMTS supports X channels and the modem does also, the CMTS will tell the modem to connect using that many or there will be problems connecting if it doesn't comply.


PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to SysOp
said by SysOp:

Sorry, I read that economy and performance do not use multiple bonded channels like Blast does.

So, what you are saying is that with the economy tier I would get channel bonding with a D3 modem?

Don't have economy, so that I can't comment on, but as for performance tier, yes, I have multiple bonded channels.
--
Deeds, not words


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
reply to SysOp
said by SysOp:

Sorry, I read that economy and performance do not use multiple bonded channels like Blast does.

So, what you are saying is that with the economy tier I would get channel bonding with a D3 modem?

As was stated, if multiple bonded channels are configured / present on the local CMTS / system, a DOCSIS 3 compliant modem will lock on to and utilize them regardless of the subscribed to speed tier.


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

1 edit
reply to SysOp
said by SysOp:

Sorry, I read that economy and performance do not use multiple bonded channels like Blast does.

So, what you are saying is that with the economy tier I would get channel bonding with a D3 modem?

A picture is worth a thousand words, so here is my 1000 word reply (I am on a 12/2 Business Class starter tier):



--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower


SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
reply to m29a
This is good info. Thanks for the update!

Only $86 for a D3 modem. Not a bad investment if your node is congested by D2 modems. Or free if you rent.


flwpwr

@comcast.net
reply to SHoTTa35
So much wrong information again. Having a d3 cmts does not guarantee channel bonding. Software must be pushed to the modem instructing it to do so, and if your tier software does not say to, it will not. Economy for my FFO did not when it was 1.5Mb [yes I waited way to long for lights to go blue on ubee modems] and I have not done an install since it went up from that speed yet. Performance tier, historically has bonded since we went to D3 in Nov 2010. Not only that but the amount of control in the cmts itself, would allow for that software to be ignored and the request by the modem to be rejected, so its entirely configurable and could thus be different from cmts to cmts even.

Do not buy a D3 modem on the hopes of getting something for nothing, you might, but you might not, there is no requirement anywhere to "give" this until you subscribe to a speed that needs it. The benefits for congestion management by the CMTS are greater, but congestion can be managed with a D2 modem by forcing it to change channels. it just inconveniences the subscriber because a reboot is required, without channel bonding. Buy the D3 modem because you want a NEW modem and its available in your budget. That's the bottom line right there.


PGHammer

join:2003-06-09
Accokeek, MD
reply to PeteC2
That is, in fact, precisely why I pointed that out.

I have four bonded channels downstream, and three upstream - and that is with Performance, not Blast. (The four downstream bonded channels I've had since I've had this modem; the three upstream channels are the result of CMTS changes.) For that reason alone, any reliability issues - peak-usage times or not - are pretty much certain to be outside of Comcast's control.

Basically "reliability, reliability, reliability".


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
I have four downstream bonded channels and three upstream bonded channels and I'm on Blast. I think the concept of multiple bonded channels is to balance the demand equally across all the channels instead of overtaxing just one which would cause a noticable slowdown?