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MW

@telus.net

High powered broadcast time limit?

This question may vary between jurisdictions,

Is there any frequency that you can broadcast for a long period? EG. Routers and computers seem to be always on. Or is there a min power output like those toy mics and cd fm transmitters.

thx



SmokChsr
Who let the magic smoke out?
Premium
join:2006-03-17
Saint Augustine, FL

I hate to say this, but at least to me your question doesn't make sense.


tobicat
Premium
join:2005-04-18
Tombstone, AZ

3 edits
reply to MW

Terminology is key. Yours appears to be somewhat confused.

What do you mean by YOU.

Without looking up exact numbers and off the top of my head.

Broadcast means continous non stop emmision of RF. Only commercial licensed stations and government stations can do that . Well maybe those dinky millawatt FM things that you can use around your house might be broadcasting. But they all have assigned power limits.

All frequencies pretty much have power limits. There may be some really high microwave that don't but the cost build anything that makes really high powr would be execessive.

Routers ect do not broadcast in true defintion they send burst of data and the frequency is shared. Power is limited.

And amateurs are specifically prohibited from broadcasting. Transmitting ain't the same as broadcasting.

An examble »www.wisp-router.com/page.php?11
--
7000S SatMex 5 1050, Dlink wirless



MW

@telus.net

said by tobicat:

Terminology is key. Yours appears to be somewhat confused.

What do you mean by YOU. (you, meaning a random person)

Without looking up exact numbers and off the top of my head.

Broadcast means continous non stop emmision of RF. Only commercial licensed stations and government stations can do that . Well maybe those dinky millawatt FM things that you can use around your house might be broadcasting. But they all have assigned power limits.

All frequencies pretty much have power limits. There may be some really high microwave that don't but the cost build anything that makes really high powr would be execessive.

Routers ect do not broadcast in true defintion they send burst of data and the frequency is shared. Power is limited.

And amateurs are specifically prohibited from broadcasting. Transmitting ain't the same as broadcasting.

An examble »www.wisp-router.com/page.php?11

LoL sorry for the bad terminology guys.

Though I think you answered my question. I didn't think a ham operator was able to "broadcast" then I started thinking about wireless routers and how they work. With a busy network, you would think it would be sending so much data, it would practically be "broadcasting" But I guess thats where the low power comes into play.

I just seen this tv episode where some guy made a home made wireless network. It didn't explain much but at first, I thought maybe he did it using ham. But now that I think about it, it was probably done just using the average router equipment. Though for some reason, they seem to imply that he was able to communicate over long distance. I suppose you shouldn't believe everything you see on TV LOL

tobicat
Premium
join:2005-04-18
Tombstone, AZ
reply to MW

I was not trying to be critical it is just hard to answer questions if you don't understand the question.

microwaves are capable of tremendous distance at very low power if there is nothing in the way. Specially if using antennas like these.

»www.fab-corp.com/home.php?cat=276
--
7000S SatMex 5 1050, Dlink wirless



Jet
Premium
join:2002-01-03
reply to MW

It mainly depends on the equipments duty cycle. Radio station equipment is rated for a 100% duty cycle, most ham stuff is rated 50% duty cycle. You key down long enough you can pop your finals in your radio.

Jet



SmokChsr
Who let the magic smoke out?
Premium
join:2006-03-17
Saint Augustine, FL
reply to MW

Not much less confused than before, but I'll throw out an answer yet I don't know if it's to the question.

Transmitter designed for continuous use can transmit for long periods of time.

HAM radio operators by rule are not allowed to "Broadcast" at all. They are allowed to transmit messages. In the HAM radio world a "Broadcast" is transmissions intended for reception by the general public, either direct or relayed.

In the computer world of WiFi, data packets are transmitted, but it is not a continuous transmission. It may seen that way but it is many short burst data transmissions.

If you are asking is there a frequency where you can set up play DJ for the community legally, the answer is easy.. Without a license, NO!



mb

join:2000-07-23
Washington, NJ
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon Online DSL

Broadcast = one way, not allowed
Transmit/Receive = two-way, required

We are licensed to use frequncies also used by the 802.11g/n standards at much higher power levels, but I'll leave it to those more knowledgeable than I to talk about the allowed emission types and station ID requirements and how they would releated to using high power wireless LANs.



DrStrange
Technically feasible
Premium
join:2001-07-23
West Hartford, CT
kudos:1

I believe the power limit at 802.11b/g frequencies for that emission type is 10 watts. That can still travel quite a distance using the right antenna.



alphapointe
Don't Touch Me
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-10
Columbia, MO
kudos:2

Yeah, I have an almost 17 mile PtP 100Mbps link running at 5905MHz at