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anon303

@comcast.net

...

When will Comcast get around to these speeds?


FloridaBoy

join:2009-06-22
Bradenton, FL

1 recommendation

I dont think they have to. The cheaper price point will do more than enough to keep them competitive while they figure out what they want to do with speeds.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast
reply to anon303

»[Speed] Northeast speed changes coming.

Not quite what you're asking for, but it looks like an improvement over what Comcast had before, albeit only being rolled out (for the moment) in FiOS areas.

Comcast is now allowing eight downstream channels to be bonded in some areas, plus three upstreams (though generally one of those upstreams is a half-width, DOCSIS 1.1 channel so it adds only 10 Mbps of capacity). Total available capacity at that point is around 300 mbps down, 70 Mbps up. Funny how Comcast would have to use its entire capacity to match Verizon's 300M tier...my guess is that Verizon sped up its highest-end tier just so that Comcast couldn't exactly match it.

What *can* Comcast do? As mentioned above, increase Blast speeds to match 50M FiOS, and increase Extreme 50 speeds to 105M down to, at least somewhat, be comparable to the 150M FiOS tier. This leaves somewhat of a gap at the high end ($200/mo) so they could put a 200-250M tier there in areas where they have eight channels to bond, with more upload speed as well. I'll bet there will be a 250M down, 35M up tier for $200 coming within the next three or four months to areas with FIOS competition. Not sure what speeds will end up being on the new 50M and 105M tiers though; my hope would be that they would just inherit the 15/20M upload speeds from the current 50/105 tiers, but that's such a huge upgrade for Blast customers (4 Mbps up now) that I'm not sure if I see that actually happening.



anon303

@comcast.net

Good point - it was a theoretical question because I can't even make use of the 20/4 speeds I'm getting! I don't need that much bandwidth for everyday internet access.



ITALIAN926

join:2003-08-16
kudos:2
reply to iansltx

Sorry to burst your bubble , but GPON Fios is capable of more than 300 Mbps


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast

I never said it wasn't. In fact, off the top of my head I know that the capacity of one PON is 2.488 Gbps down, 1.244 Gbps up (OC-48 down, OC-24 up). This is how Chattanooga EPB is able to deliver symmetric gigabit service over GPON...it's a little bit of a squeeze to do that, but nothing nearly as shaky as Cablevision's habit of shoving 101/15 onto 3x1 bonded DOCSIS 3 channels, or 30/5 onto a single channel up and down a few years back.

I merely suggested that Verizon's 300M tier was placed just out of reach of Comcast's current network capacity at the last mile, so VZ won't have to upgrade its tier speeds until Comcast starts handing out 24-channel-bonded modems to its highest-end subscribers. Those modems are out now, but in order to use them Comcast would have to dedicate 144MHz of their cable network to downstream DOCSIS channels, out of maybe 800MHz available for downstream communications overall (860MHz total, minus below-the-split return path channels). At that point Comcast will be able to hit 300 Mbps without an issue, but that level of plant upgrades would take a year or so to complete across any significant portion of their network, leaving Verizon with a bunch of well-paying, friend-recommending power users once again.


bemis

join:2008-07-18
Reading, MA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to FloridaBoy

said by FloridaBoy:

I dont think they have to. The cheaper price point will do more than enough to keep them competitive while they figure out what they want to do with speeds.

I agree. I switched from 25/25 FIOS to 16/2 Comcast because the $35/mo was more important then the additional speed.

Depending on what you use your connection for, and your patience, the lower speed traded off to lower price can certainly be worth it.

tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·ooma
·Optimum Online
·Verizon FiOS

The same tradeoff can be made with Cablevision's 50/8 vs 50/25... for $44.90 vs $70+ with Verizon. Of course when the 50/8 is $65.. it's within the ballpark of Verizon cutting a deal to gain subscribers. Verizon officially killed off symmetrical speeds for residential customers. Right now, internet is all I'm buying from a cable or telco so I'll gravitate to the best deal I can get. ATM, that is cablevision. One day, the entire tier list will see futher speed bumps but probably not for another two years. Look forward to writing about this in June 2014.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to bemis

said by bemis:

Depending on what you use your connection for, and your patience, the lower speed traded off to lower price can certainly be worth it.

That is my rationale for staying with 5mb/s DSL (under $50) instead of faster cable (over $65)!
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum
Expand your moderator at work