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Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Krisnatharok

Re: Troubleshooting a PSU

Took apart the computer, unplugged all the HDDs/ODDs, reseated the CPU, reset the CMOS via jumper, put in verified good RAM, put in the new PSU--no dice. Thing is still very dead.

I'm guessing it's either a bad power button (this mobo is so cheap there is no on/off or reset switch on it) or a blown mobo. My friend's asked me to order a new mobo for him regardless (guessing it was the 785G he got with one PCIe 2.0 slot when he asked the builder for SLI capability up front), so a 990X is on it's way.

On the off-chance that the power button on the HAF-912 was blown too, does anyone have an easy way to jump-start a mobo by shorting the right leads? I linked the mobo manual, just not sure on the execution, since electricity and I don't normally mix sans protection.
--
If we lose this freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment, those who had the most to lose, did the least to prevent its happening.


asdfdfdfdfdf
Premium
join:2012-05-09
kudos:3
Reviews:
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You can quickly short the two on/off switch pins on the header where the power switch is connected with something like a screwdriver head. That is all the switch does.

A, perhaps less disconcerting approach, is to disonnect the on off switch and connect the reset switch in its place.
The reset switch is also a momentary switch and can be swapped with the power switch, connecting it to the on off pins. Then you just press the reset switch as you would the on off button to temporarily short the pins. Holding it down for a number of seconds should shut it down just as the on off button would do.



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

So I tried the reset switch on the power pins, as well as shorting the power pins with a screwdriver head and didn't get anything.

I'm guessing the mobo is fried, but I won't know if any damage was done to the CPU until the new mobo arrives, hopefully tomorrow.
--
If we lose this freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment, those who had the most to lose, did the least to prevent its happening.



Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19

What are you planning on doing with the PSU now that the original may not be bad?



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

1 edit

Throwing it in my friend's rig, as I am wary of hooking anything up to the Kingwin since I am still not sure if it is what caused the mobo to blow out.

I'll give him back the Kingwin and have him take that and the mobo back to the original vendor and give him a chance to buy the shit back from him, since my friend specifically stated a Corsair PSU and a mobo with SLI capability. He got the cheapo Kingwin PSU (not even bronze certified) and a $50 MSI AM3 mobo that lacks any multi-GPU capability (and even has only one PCIe 2.0 slot).

If the computer builder guy laughs him off, we'll both hit him with bad reviews on Google, lodge a complaint with the BBB, and then feed it to Reddit as well to devour.

This guy is making false promises to non-technical customers about the capabilities of the computers he is selling them and also agreeing to use name-brand components but putting the cheapest shit he can find in there--the mobo was probably around $50 (lacked the SLI/Crossfire capability he assured my friend it had), the PSU is unreliable (uncertified, cheaper than a 750w PSU should be), the ram is a mix of bargain Crucial and ADATA, cooler is stock, and he actually removed one of the two 120mm fans in the front of the HAF-912. This probably lead to some of the heat problems that may have precipitated the computer's failure (not helped by the Galaxy 560ti, a version of the card that runs a little hot).

--
If we lose this freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment, those who had the most to lose, did the least to prevent its happening.