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pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
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Garage door insulation ??

I'm adding a new living area over my garage, and we live in the Northeast (Connecticut). I'm thinking about a single garage door (about 16 or 18') we have 2 large SUV's and currently two 8' single garage doors.

I personally think it may make sense to insulate the garage walls and get an insulated garage door.

When looking I've seen garage doors claiming to be R19 (excluding windows).

Is R19 too much insulation? Is there no point to insulating a garage with a living area above. The builder and architect think insulation under the floor of the addition will be mostly sufficient. Any thoughts??
--
"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use."



The Pig
I know you want to be me
Premium
join:2009-09-11

Do you have heat in the garage?
If not, how would insulation help?

Make sure the door from the garage to the house is AIR TIGHT and there are no vents going from the garage to the house also!!


pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
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I've never habitable area over a garage before and don't know if it's helpful to have the garage insulated. That's why I'm posting.
--
"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use."



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

Well if it's only about the living space above the garage, the best location for insulation would be in the garage ceiling.

Garage door insulation is useful for if you want your garage to be heated for X reason (Or your garage is part of the house foundation).


Viper677
Certified Home Inspector

join:2012-03-22
Toronto
reply to pandora

said by pandora:

I'm adding a new living area over my garage, and we live in the Northeast (Connecticut). I'm thinking about a single garage door (about 16 or 18') we have 2 large SUV's and currently two 8' single garage doors.

I personally think it may make sense to insulate the garage walls and get an insulated garage door.

When looking I've seen garage doors claiming to be R19 (excluding windows).

Is R19 too much insulation? Is there no point to insulating a garage with a living area above. The builder and architect think insulation under the floor of the addition will be mostly sufficient. Any thoughts??

Insulating a garage door is a good idea, depending on how cold it gets in your area. In my area, there can be a dT of 20 degrees from inside of the garage to the outside (this is considering that it is an attached garage).

Insulating garage door is not required but make sure that the ceiling is insulated else the room above is going to be colder that the rest of the house.

Also you can not have supply heat registers in garage because the exhaust fumes form vehicles can enter your living space.

I am not sure what different grades of insulated garage doors are available in the market but in my opinion R19 is a little too much. An exterior wall is between R17 to R21. So R19, i think is an over kill.
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Certified Home Inspector
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cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to pandora

When I replaced my garage door several years ago, the readily available options were either steel tray with no insulation, steel tray with styrofoam insulation glued on the back, or insulation sandwiched between two steel panels. I went with the latter as I didn't want just a steel tray due to noise, and with multiple kids I wasn't sure how long the styrofoam insulation would last.

Like Viper above, I have a noticeable temperature difference between inside and out of my garage in winter. Any insulation is not going to hurt you aside from initial cost.


Viper677
Certified Home Inspector

join:2012-03-22
Toronto
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

Well if it's only about the living space above the garage, the best location for insulation would be in the garage ceiling.

Garage door insulation is useful for if you want your garage to be heated for X reason (Or your garage is part of the house foundation).

Correct - insulating garage door will only help OP with keeping the garage area at a decent temperature (good for parked vehicles etc). It will not help keep the insider any warmer.
--
Certified Home Inspector
Certified Level 1 Thermographer


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to pandora

I have a living room over the garage. Make sure the insulation in the floor is adequate. You may never recoup the cost of insulating the garage walls and door as you will lose heat through the garage floor anyway. If the door is fairly tight it will minimize the leaks and keep the garage reasonably warm in winter (any warmth will be from the leaks though...)



Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to pandora

The basic insulated garage doors are R9.7 that's I'm looking at. That should be plenty.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to pandora

As others have said insulating the ceiling of the garage will provide the most benefit. You're much better off spending more money there instead of the doors. Closed cell spray insulation would be the best but unfortunately is also the most expensive. We put it in our garage ceiling a couple of years ago and it made a tremendous difference.

I would also reconsider replacing the two smaller doors with a larger one. With smaller doors you only need to open half the total area for a car to come and go. With the bigger door you opened twice the total area and thus have a more dramatic affect on the temperature of the garage.


Viper677
Certified Home Inspector

join:2012-03-22
Toronto

said by Msradell:

As others have said insulating the ceiling of the garage will provide the most benefit. You're much better off spending more money there instead of the doors. Closed cell spray insulation would be the best but unfortunately is also the most expensive. We put it in our garage ceiling a couple of years ago and it made a tremendous difference.

I would also reconsider replacing the two smaller doors with a larger one. With smaller doors you only need to open half the total area for a car to come and go. With the bigger door you opened twice the total area and thus have a more dramatic affect on the temperature of the garage.

OK I am not sure if OP is trying to insulate the garage door to keep his garage space warm OR

If the goal is to keep the living room warm by insulate the garage door.

If the main purpose is to keep the living room above garage warm then all he needs to do it to make sure that the ceiling of the garage is insulated.
--
Certified Home Inspector
Certified Level 1 Thermographer


Daarken
Rara Avises
Premium
join:2005-01-12
Southwest LA
kudos:3
reply to pandora

When I got home from work today (almost 8pm) I walked into my uninsulated garage, and was surprised at the temperature.
Thermometer read 101 F.
I recently replaced the siding on my home, and they installed on the north and west walls 3/4" styrofoam insulation.
I have no insulation in the attic space above the garage which is open to the rest of the house, which has 8 inches of blown insulation.
Should I add more blown in, and also insulate above the garage itself?
--
Getting it Done.



jkj860
The Final Frontier

join:2002-01-10
Valparaiso, IN

1 edit
reply to pandora

Keep in mind that every time that overhead door is opened you will lose a lot of cooled/heated air. Thats a big hole in the wall! I wouldnt go extreme on the overhead door insulation. Spend the money on floor and wall insulation instead.
One other note. The R-value is measured through the door. It doesnt take into consideration the installation. Your air infiltration will be through the perimeter of the door where it seals against the walls. The tighter it seals the better. Unfortunately, most rely on a vinyl trim with a thin rubber seal against the door.
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I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant. Nixon



Nuckfuts
Premium
join:2003-10-18
Joliet, IL
reply to cdru

said by cdru:

When I replaced my garage door several years ago, the readily available options were either steel tray with no insulation, steel tray with styrofoam insulation glued on the back, or insulation sandwiched between two steel panels. I went with the latter as I didn't want just a steel tray due to noise, and with multiple kids I wasn't sure how long the styrofoam insulation would last.

Like Viper above, I have a noticeable temperature difference between inside and out of my garage in winter. Any insulation is not going to hurt you aside from initial cost.

My new house came with just a steel door. First winter I had no insulation on it. That summer I insulated it and I can confirm and agree it helps keep the garage somewhat warmer in the winters than without. At least all or most of the snow melts off the cars now.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to jkj860

said by jkj860:

Keep in mind that every time that overhead door is opened you will lose a lot of cooled/heated air

The difference in energy lost is negligible. Just think about it, a bathroom fan replaces some 100cuft of air every minute... YAWN.

Viper677
Certified Home Inspector

join:2012-03-22
Toronto

said by cowboyro:

said by jkj860:

Keep in mind that every time that overhead door is opened you will lose a lot of cooled/heated air

The difference in energy lost is negligible. Just think about it, a bathroom fan replaces some 100cuft of air every minute... YAWN.

I agree.
--
Certified Home Inspector
Certified Level 1 Thermographer