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SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS

4 edits

Decarbonising Engine with Water

35k on the odometer, 12 year old car. Did a Seafoam treatment in the vacuum line. Helped but not perfect. Put Lucas gas treatment in the tank. Changed gas stations, filling up with Chevron w/ Techron. Still felt like a miss during WOT. Could be a number of things.

Took the car to Higgins Ford performance to get the brakes done and transmission serviced and a tech tells me about using water to clean the inside of the motor. Platinum spark plugs are good for 100k but they can foul. If this does not work than I will get the coils and injectors tested.

So I read into it and decided to try it out on my 99' Lincoln Continental.

Very nice results with the distilled water. Drove the car to bring it up to temp, used the brake booster vacuum line to run 16oz or water @3k rpm into the motor, kept the motor running, reattached the vac line, then drove it 70-80mph on the hwy.

On the return trip home, it really seems to have worked. Taking off from a red light, 0-45mph wot, the power was very smooth, much better than before.

Recommended.


rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Mediacom

...goes home to stick garden hose in throttle body.... lol.
Goes along with pouring "marvel mystery oil " in the carb prior to hitting the highway to free up valves etc. Sucks getting pulled over in a smoke screen , while keeping the engine above 2000 RPM to keep from stalling, and trying to convince the officer that it was not on fire and if I let up on her she will die. Was common enough back then that after I yelled out the window, he said OK and away I went in a cloud of blueish grey.



PremTech101

@aircloud.com
reply to SysOp

This reminds me to go take a swig of some Isopropyl alcohol. Hydrolock the motor can be a real win!


rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Mediacom

1 edit
reply to SysOp

Funny coincidence maybe? Last night my boss's car broke down while his wife was driving it. Went to look at it and found it had a horrible extremely LOUD metallic knock/bang equal in timing to one of the 4 cylinders. The sound was so bad I was expecting to see a rod come thru the oil pan or the dipstick blow out of the tube any second cause the piston finally busted. No smoke though, and a surprisingly dang smooth idle. An equally smooth run with a rise in rpm, despite the deafening sound similar to a piston smacking a valve or busted rod. No backfiring thru intake or exhaust kinda ruled out the valve idea and the smooth idle makes me think a rod wasn't broke. It appeared and ran as if it was firing on all 4 so there could not have been too much loss of compression.
Did not let it run long enough to smoke, but this post got me thinking that maybe his little antifreeze leak that could never be found turned into a cylinder 1/2 full of water. I have heard the knock of water in a cylinder before but it was a long time ago and alot different engine type then. We may never know, as this is his timely excuse to get a new car.

EDIT: We know. Bent rod. Now busted rod. Big difference in idle, or lack thereof.



SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA

4 edits
reply to PremTech101

Decarbonising the engine with water mist does not cause hydro-lock.

Register a free account for the win?



SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA

4 edits
reply to rfnut

A blown gasket filling a cylinder full of coolant causing hydro-lock is not the same as decarbonising the engine with a water mist.


rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2

It is at first since if it starts as a small leak. It will be the cleanest cylinder.



PremTech101

@aircloud.com
reply to SysOp

I think your on the bad end of a joke. I've never in my 43 years have I heard of someone using water to decarb an engine. To me its much easier to go out and buy a can of B-12 Chemtool thats meant for the purpose.


rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Mediacom

Squirt bottle in the carb was not unheard of, especially with the old 4 barrel quadrajet dumping enough fuel to create carbon so thick it would knock on even leaded premium due to the increase in compression. I will admit I never heard of pouring into the booster vacuum tube, but then again a newer system with no easy air intake like the old carbs seems possible. With the advances in fuel, injection systems and computer controlled volumes I would think the problem would not be too common.



boogi man

join:2001-11-13
Jacksonville, FL
kudos:1
reply to SysOp

ahhh the old steam clean deal. yeah it works. been thinking about using on the jeep. haven't broke that trick out in a while. just have to keep the revs up to keep from stalling and to make sure the water has a better shot of being evenly distributed and better atomized. little bit at a time and you should be fine.

as for newer fuels to a point yeah but if the car already was carboned up or is just an older less efficient engine then the newer fuels really aren't going to do much for you.
--
my site



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to rfnut

said by rfnut:

With the advances in fuel, injection systems and computer controlled volumes I would think the problem would not be too common.

Hell - I have not needed to do this to any car I have owned in 30 years - carb or FI.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain

rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Mediacom

I take it you were not a tinkerer and never had to maintain a "junker". While I did turn a wrench as a living for a while, the most enjoyment I had was in the backyard in the shade keeping some old piece o junk going, rather than maintaining a good vehicle.
Hell ya can't even set points with a matchstick anymore, besides nobody gives away book matches. Times change.
Since water was the original topic, Add a little sawdust in the radiator water (has no antifreeze, cause it leaks too bad and is expensive) and ya got a good stop leak. Even seals head gaskets, for a while.



mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to PremTech101

said by PremTech101 :

I think your on the bad end of a joke. I've never in my 43 years have I heard of someone using water to decarb an engine. To me its much easier to go out and buy a can of B-12 Chemtool thats meant for the purpose.

Well in my (more) years, it wasn't uncommon at all, and was generally quite productive. Of course it was also much easier to pour the water down the carb, all the while revving it up to keep it hot and get the best effect. Ya, it worked.


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
reply to PremTech101

said by PremTech101 :

I think your on the bad end of a joke. I've never in my 43 years have I heard of someone using water to decarb an engine. To me its much easier to go out and buy a can of B-12 Chemtool thats meant for the purpose.

It's no joke or prank. I do it when it is warranted for a vehicle and you really should be familiar with it. The 60"s Oldsmobiles used it as water injection on their turbo cars to help prevent knock and to keep the engine and turbo clean of carbon deposits.

TEST RESULTS USING WATER TO CLEAN CARBON OUT OF A Engine
»www.files.thinksitout.com/Alt_Fu···gine.pdf

And water injection....

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_inje···gines%29
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS

1 edit
reply to SysOp

So it's been a couple of days now since, and I am happy to report it really worked.

The steam must have cleaned off- a fouled spark plug?, fouled injector tip?, dirty MAF sensor?, or dirty o2 sensors?

The car really is running much better than before, no more power loss at throttle up. The difference is night and day.



mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3



It can help with several things, including gunk and carbon deposits on the back of the valves, carbon deposits on the pistons and combustion chamber surfaces, and also to a smaller degree, contaminates on the spark plugs and injectors.



SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
reply to SysOp

Should I repeat the process again in a few weeks?

Do I need to change the oil?



Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18

said by SysOp:

Should I repeat the process again in a few weeks?

Sure or you can do it today/tomorrow/this weekend. There is no waiting period so if it shows signs of still having carbon build up you can repeat the steps.

said by SysOp:

Do I need to change the oil?

If it is due for a change by time or mileage, otherwise using water to clean the carbon deposits does not contaminate the engine oil. The carbon that is removed is broken up and sent into the exhaust system and out the pipe.
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


tao
Frazzlebats
Premium
join:2000-12-03
Lansing, MI
reply to SysOp

35k in 12 years? That water washed out the cobwebs.

OTOH, you are treating symptoms - the water treatment mitigates the effects of the problem your car has - unburned fuel - why?



SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS

1 edit

It could have been a number of things. Bad coil. Fouled spark plug. Bad injector.

After seafoam, lucas and now the water treatment, I can rule out the cobwebs

I think the malperformance I experienced was due to carbon deposits.

The car was bought new in West Palm Beach Fl and dealer maintained for 12 years until it was traded in at a West Palm Beach Volvo dealership and sold at auction. With such a low average of miles driven per year by a single owner living in an area know for it's retierment comunities I assume such short drives was not getting the engine hot enough for long enough to burn off the carbon deposits naturally.



Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
reply to tao

said by tao:

35k in 12 years? That water washed out the cobwebs.

OTOH, you are treating symptoms - the water treatment mitigates the effects of the problem your car has - unburned fuel - why?

Sounds like the engine actually had carbon deposits in the combustion chamber and those tend to glow red and cause early detonation/misfiring before the plug has delivered it's spark. It sounds like the decarbonization did exactly what it does and has improved the performance of the engine by removing carbon and the hot spots it creates.
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?

Network Guy
Premium
join:2000-08-25
New York
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Future Nine Corp..
·T-Mobile US
·Optimum Online

Interesting thread

For the past year or so I've used SeaFoam every 3,000 miles. I'll add 7 oz into dirty engine oil via crankcase right before oil change is due and drive the car for 100 miles, per instructions in the can. After I change the oil, I'll add an entire can of SeaFoam via brake booster vacuum line while engine is idling and up to normal operating temp. The white smoke that comes out of exhaust while I pour it in this is scary. It's even scarier when I drive the car at 70 on the highway after pouring it in so that the white smoke clears.

I've done this mainly to get rid of the rough idle that my Jeep had when I first bought it, and it's worked. Granted, one could never completely get rid of the good ole Chrysler shake, but I call that can 16 ounces of wonders.

Would you know if the water method is more effective than using SeaFoam via brake booster line?



SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS

New fuel filter, new air filter, new transmission oil/filter, new engine oil/filter.

Then I used seafoam in the vacuum line, followed by Lucas gas treatment in the 1st tank, then Chevron w/Techron in the 2nd tank.

Still had what I assume was carbon build up and what felt like a missfire. Immediate results after decarbonizing the engine with water. Missfire was gone.

Yes. It was more effective this time around.


Network Guy
Premium
join:2000-08-25
New York
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Future Nine Corp..
·T-Mobile US
·Optimum Online

So you're saying you fed your engine 16 ounces of bottled water via brake booster vacuum line and went to town on the throttle? Was the improvement immediate?

I wouldn't mind trying that on my Jeep on the next oil change. A bottle of water from the store is much cheaper than Seafoam. lol



Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18

said by Network Guy:

So you're saying you fed your engine 16 ounces of bottled water via brake booster vacuum line and went to town on the throttle?

No, the brake booster line is too big. You should spray or pour through the throttle plates / butterfly valve at a fast idle (2K to 3K).

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWqN8pBHJhE

--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
reply to Network Guy

said by Network Guy:

I wouldn't mind trying that on my Jeep on the next oil change. A bottle of water from the store is much cheaper than Seafoam. lol

Seafoam is still needed to add to the oil and the gas so it can clean the rings, lifters, valve stems and injectors as the water does not flow to those areas and would not be beneficial if added to your oil or gas.
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?

Network Guy
Premium
join:2000-08-25
New York
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Future Nine Corp..
·T-Mobile US
·Optimum Online
reply to Doctor Olds

said by Doctor Olds:


No, the brake booster line is too big. You should spray or pour through the throttle plates / butterfly valve at a fast idle (2K to 3K).

I'm confused.

The brake booster line in my Jeep is maybe about half-inch in diameter. The throttle body is I believe about 4 inches in diameter. Unless what I'm calling "brake booster line" isn't really that. It's a rubber hose that I pull off from the brake master cylinder assembly and connects right into throttle body.

And yea.. It would be funny in a sinister way to pour water via crankshaft or gas tank, but not on my vehicle. lol


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18

said by Network Guy:

said by Doctor Olds:


No, the brake booster line is too big. You should spray or pour through the throttle plates / butterfly valve at a fast idle (2K to 3K).

I'm confused.

The brake booster line in my Jeep is maybe about half-inch in diameter. The throttle body is I believe about 4 inches in diameter. Unless what I'm calling "brake booster line" isn't really that. It's a rubber hose that I pull off from the brake master cylinder assembly and connects right into throttle body.

If you stick the brake booster hose into the water it will suck way too much water as you need to instead slowly pour the water into the hose (use a funnel in the hose if your aim is not dead on) while running at a fast idle. However if the hose connects to the engine where it does not equally distribute the water into the intake and then equally to all the cylinders that isn't a even cleaning as the closer intake ports will get more water than the further away ports. That's why any vacuum line is normally not recommended unless it opens centrally right behind the throttle body butterfly plates. It is best to pour slowly into the central throttle body or carb on older cars for the best distribution.
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS

3 edits
reply to SysOp

Since my car is fuel injected, the vacuum line connected to the throttle body ahead of the intake manifold delivers an even distribution to the engine cylinders. For a carb, you just pour directly into the top of the carb.

It's easy to tell how fast to pour by listening for the motor to bog down.



Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2

I've used a spray bottle in the past, pumped fairly fast. It works well.

Regulate the pumps you give according to the engine idle.
--
Better to have it and not need it, then need it and not have it.