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Gonzo310

join:2012-07-01
Compton, CA

[TWC] What is the wire that Time Warner is running to my fuse bo

I only have internet from them, and they ran a small green wire to my fuse box. Unfortunately the wire was accidentally cut, however, it did not affect my connection in any way, shape or form. So is such cable really necessary?


dustman81

join:2002-05-28
Tallmadge, OH

Re: [TWC] What is the wire that Time Warner is running to my fus

That is a ground wire. It is required by the National Electrical Code. If you call TWC, they'd probably fix it for you.



Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH
reply to Gonzo310

You could easily just twist the 2 cut wires together. It's un-insulated
and will twist easily. There's no current, so it aint gonna bite.
Could hit the twist with some solder.
You could safely go 62 years and have no issues being ungrounded.



swintec
Premium,VIP
join:2003-12-19
Alfred, ME
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VoicePulse
·Sprint Mobile Br..
·RapidVPS

said by Elyria:

You could safely go 62 years and have no issues being ungrounded.

But that 63rd year, watch out.
--
Usenet Block Accounts | Unlimited Accounts


ds5v50

join:2003-01-22
Fremont, OH

Tell me about it. I lost a lot of phones years ago through ATT. Then along came TWC Digi phone and the tech grounded my connections and the loss of phone equipment stopped. Then to find out that was the reason we kept losing phones during storms really made me feel this "" big.



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15
reply to Elyria

said by Elyria:

You could safely go 62 years and have no issues being ungrounded.

Or you could start loosing equipment and wiring as soon as it's cut....


Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH

Or you could start loosing equipment and wiring as soon as it's cut....

Highly unlikely , but anything's possible via the interweb


hobgoblin
Sortof Agoblin
Premium
join:2001-11-25
Orchard Park, NY
kudos:10

"Highly unlikely , but anything's possible via the interweb"

As I know how much experience Drew has, I am much more likely to follow his advice than yours. Of course I dont know your field experience.

Hob
--
"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds."
- Ralph Waldo Emerson



Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH

2 edits

me ??

42 years IBEW

B4 this gets goofy.....all I originally said was repair. Also hinted
it wasn't a super serious [human harm] and could ignore safely
[till it gets properly terminated] I am "NOT" suggesting folks run
un-grounded circuits.

SHEESH



hobgoblin
Sortof Agoblin
Premium
join:2001-11-25
Orchard Park, NY
kudos:10

Sorry I considered this

"Highly unlikely , but anything's possible via the interweb"

a sarcastic comment to one of the most knowledgeable cable people I know. I missed your earlier get it fixed comment.

Hob
--
"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds."
- Ralph Waldo Emerson



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:10
reply to Gonzo310

Get it fixed. While not used most of the time, it's there for When things go wrong.

Back when I lived in CC land, they didn't bother with it. I was losing cable modems (and ports on connected equipment) every 8 months or so due to close (but not that close) lightning strikes. When TV was added we had a horrible ground loop in both sound and picture. After fixing it both the ground loop went away and not another modem got fried.

/M



Sl101

@rr.com
reply to Gonzo310

The green Wire is a ground wire.



Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH

said by dustman81:

That is a ground wire. It is required by the National Electrical Code. If you call TWC, they'd probably fix it for you.

2nd post within this here thread. Glad I wore my reading glasses tonight.

Pokesomi

join:2007-11-08
Lake Forest, CA

Yes that would be a ground wire, though why its for a coax line I have no idea. Those are grounded seperately by using the shielding as the ground return path since coax is a DC system.



rcdailey
Dragoonfly
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Rialto, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to ds5v50

I remember, many years ago, installing a Demon Dialer for whole-house auto-dialing (when most phones couldn't do that themselves). Anyway, I did not have the connection properly grounded, but fortunately, I had to call the phone company for service and the guy found my mistake(s) and fixed things before anything happened.
--
It is easier for a camel to put on a bikini than an old man to thread a needle.



Jabbu
Premium
join:2002-03-06
reply to Pokesomi

Cable Co will use a green wire to *bond* with power's ground. Typically only the power co has a ground at a residence, old telco used to bury there own rods, but most cheated and cut the ground from 6+ feet down to a foot or two.

A power bond is for everyone's safety, if there was power sitting on the cable, as soon as you touched the modem, for example, you'd create a path to earth and get zapped, the bond is creating this around the clock. It will *help* if a lightning strike hits your pole by taking most of the power straight to earth.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to Elyria

"You could safely go 62 years and have no issues being ungrounded."

Oohhhhhhhh..... Here come the grounding Nazis to set you straight.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.



blakbas

join:2000-04-27
Woodbridge, VA

1 recommendation

reply to Elyria

said by Elyria:

Or you could start loosing equipment and wiring as soon as it's cut....

Highly unlikely , but anything's possible via the interweb

The interweb had nothing to do with it, but a lightening strike outside his house does. Also do not just twist it together as I have seen high voltages that have come down a ground blow twisted and wire nutted connections apart thus making the ground useless. My experience is 25yrs installing and repairing phone service with Verizon.


Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH
reply to battleop

said by battleop:

Oohhhhhhhh..... Here come the grounding Nazis to set you straight.

I find it amusing. All of a sudden......everyone's packing NEMA code books.

does anyone "actually" read complete threads ? .....do they ? comprehension issues ?


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to Gonzo310

That green wire that TWC installed is a ground wire. It is required by law as it protects your equipment, and their equipment from any AC voltage on the line or lightning strikes. It is also for your safety and the safety of their employees. There have been telephone and Cable TV techs that have been injured/killed by AC current present in their facilities. They have tools that they use to check for stray voltage before they begin their work.

If this wire is cut, you should contact them to set up a truck roll and they will fix it at no charge as it is required by law.


etaadmin

join:2002-01-17
Dallas, TX
kudos:1
reply to Gonzo310

That green wire is required and used by the flux capacitor to produce the 1.21 GigaWatts used in docsis3.0 upstream bonded channels...


etaadmin

join:2002-01-17
Dallas, TX
kudos:1
reply to Elyria

said by Elyria:

You could easily just twist the 2 cut wires together. It's un-insulated
and will twist easily. There's no current, so it aint gonna bite.
Could hit the twist with some solder.
You could safely go 62 years and have no issues being ungrounded.

I've seen voltages as high as 50 VAC when this circuit is open or cut I remember seen a picture here »adslm.dohrenburg.net/images/grou···tial.jpg

This is the site »adslm.dohrenburg.net/troubleshoo···hielding


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

3 edits
reply to Gonzo310

Elyria's advice is extremely bad in more ways than one.

As others have elaborated simply twisting the wires together is not good nor is any extremely sharp bends in the wire.

Foreign voltage can and does find its way into these systems.

Call them, they will fix it.



Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH
reply to Gonzo310

Makes you wonder if they think some kinda prize will be awarded for the most duplicated comments. Proof, that few do any type of reading before making the most silly, of comments.



Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH
reply to etaadmin

This is the site »adslm.dohrenburg.net/troubleshoo···hielding

etaadmin....

great visual reference !!!!!!

Now.....you think anyone will actually read it ?



DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

1 edit
reply to Elyria

said by Elyria:

Makes you wonder if they think some kinda prize will be awarded for the most duplicated comments. Proof, that few do any type of reading before making the most silly, of comments.

Sometimes advice is so unbelievably bad as to warrant this type of response.

Twisting broken ground wires together is one of the first NO NO's we were taught in wire safety.

These rules are there for a reason.


LawryTB

@comcast.net

DataBiker: you're reading (or not understanding) what the advice actually was. You're not understanding that nothing was suggested as permanent.
I read it as a low risk , temp fix and that suggestion was in no way putting anyone in a health risk position. Understanding problems in an imperfect world and offering temp fixes is quite acceptable. If you understood the equipment being discussed , then you'd realize that absense of a proper groud path in no carries personal risk to the user. To shut everything down and wait for a truck roll,in this case, would not be acceptable. The user could easily just ignore or simply perform a twist patch awaiting more permanent fix by the company. Rules are fine, no argument there. But having an understanding of risk factors, often defines how helpfull suggestions are formulated.



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

2 edits

said by LawryTB :

DataBiker: you're reading (or not understanding) what the ad If you understood the equipment being discussed , then you'd realize that absense of a proper groud path in no carries personal risk to the user.

Tell that to the people involved in the situations I've seen...

1. Power company lines touching wet trees which were also rubbing on cable company strand. The stray electricity intermittently kept melting the nearest cable customers aerial drop (since it was grounded). I'd hate to see what would happen to the customer's equipment if it wasn't grounded or if the customer or tech mistakenly becomes the ground or a ground jumper. The drop had been replaced several times over a few months as storms moved through and got the tree wet. Edison was called out and declared the house and it's drop good. They missed the short caused by the tree as it was in the next yard over.

2. Multiple occurrences of hot equipment chassis caused by equipment plugged into outlets with reversed hot and neutral lines and no ground plugs. Coax shielding was acting as ground, with 60-120VAC on it. Customers didn't know of the problems until the techs got shocked installing/fixing cable boxes and modems.

3. Ground rod driven in utility easement shorts power mains to cable distribution network (and others) energizing the shielding of the cable distribution system for blocks. Obviously this was found and fixed quickly. No one was hurt but thousands were spent fixing what it fried.

Cable systems are pretty safe until outside power faults occur, that's when bonding is really needed and why it's there. That's also why water, gas, phone, and any other metallic utility service needs to be bonded to ground at the entrance of the home.

To say "it carries no personal risk to the user" assumes nothing is wrong to begin with. I'd recommend getting TWC out there to fix it ASAP and not to touch it without knowing if it has voltage on it.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


Elyria

join:2011-10-12
Elyria, OH

Nothing to argue with your examples. What I was originally suggesting and what "I think" LarryTB is also -based on the OP's original topic-

That there is nothing to indicate the cut grd wire was an immediate life threatening situation. And I DO know -matter-of-factly- that the temp twist would be better than none. NOT a perm fix....but temp

which once again..........has been said numerous times



DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

2 edits
reply to LawryTB

said by LawryTB :

If you understood the equipment being discussed , then you'd realize that absense of a proper groud path in no carries personal risk to the user.

Absolutely false.

It is called Foreign Voltage. Cable lines are a large system that can incur foreign voltage at many points.

It may not be likely but it can happen.

Properly equipped Cable and Telco workers carry foreign voltage detectors for a reason.