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obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

poor water pressure in just kitchen sink

Lately, I have had poor water pressure in the kitchen sink. The pressure is fine for the bathroom as is the shower. I cleaned out the aerator at the faucet and that did not help.
I called my "usual" plumber but he is out of town this week. I notice now when I turn the faucet on there is a small leak of water where the spray nozzle is.
Are there any suggestions I can take to see what may be the issue? I'm a novice. I would go out and buy a new faucet but I'm concerned about water shooting out all over or not being able to put it back. My wife will flip.



beck
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-29
On The Road
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Stablehost.com

Do you have water shutoffs for your hot and cold under the sink? If so, then I would take the line off (if it looks good, not corroded etc) and using bucket and towels, turn the water on for each of the shutoffs (one at a time) and see if one of them is blocked. If they see to have full flow, then it's something in the faucet. Try hooking them back up and see if they are working better. Sometimes it's just a bit of junk caught in the line where it bends or a junction.

If you replace the faucet try a Moen. I like them because they have a tool to tighten them that comes with the faucet. If you have a "normal" faucet, then replacing it shouldn't be hard. Just make sure that the holes you have match the holes needed for the new faucet. Otherwise you have to cut etc.
--
Women are Angels.
And when someone breaks our wings,
we simply continue to fly...usually on a broomstick.
We are flexible like that.



obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ

Yes. I have two shutoff valves under the sink. Would I just have to turn them in the "off" position? That would mean that no water would be flowing through?



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

3 recommendations

Basically yes, turn the valves off and no water pressure (you will still have a little water in the line). You can then unscrew the lines and put them in a bucket, then slowly turn the valves back on one at a time.

I don't want to scare you because this is a very DIY friendly job, but a few words of caution are in order. Sometimes the shutoff valves will not turn off all the way, sometimes they start leaking after you turn them on and off, sometimes they won't shutoff at all, sometimes the nipple coming out of the wall will break when you really wrench on a stuck valve. Those things aren't likely to happen, but before you mess with those valves, make sure you know how to turn off the water to the entire house. You don't want to be looking for it after you start flooding the place.



cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to obeythelaw

Is the water pressure less at the sink under both (hot and cold) at faucet ? (incase it is a valve under the sink)
If you have flex lines from h/c valves under the kitchen sink, make sure none are kinked.

The above post about testing hot and cold lines is good if you have flex hoses to the faucet. If rigid, it might be more difficult.

I had a pressure issue once and it was dumb-I forgot I never fully opened the valves after some plumbing work in the kitchen.

(usually, if any solder or plumbing is done in the house, some blobs might end up down the line...which your cleaning/inspecting the faucet screen is first tip). Having a bucket handy is a plus!
--
Splat



obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ
reply to obeythelaw

Thanks for the info. I am going to post some pics here when I get home.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
reply to obeythelaw

Just a general question that might help in future posts. How old is the house plumbing and the faucet? The answer can be potentially different for both.
--
nohup rm -fr /&



obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to cableties

No, water pressure is the same for both-weak. I have never touched the kitchen sink so I don't think any lines would be kinked but I guess you never know. I'm the kind of guy that never touches plumbing or electrical in my house. I am going to post some pictures of the sink setup so that everyone here can have a clearer picture.



obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ
reply to sempergoofy

House is about 40 years old.


JEDCLAMPIT

join:2007-11-19
Coraopolis, PA
reply to obeythelaw

Low pressure is actually a low volume problem, if both hot and cold are low and service valves are all the way open I will bet the fixture inlet is restricted, sometimes they are screened.
Are there 2 separate valves on top of sink for hot and cold or a combination( single control)?
This info may indicate where the restriction is in the line of flow.



cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to obeythelaw

You may have a clogged filter. Do you have normal flow at the spray nozzle?



djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to obeythelaw

If they're both weak it's likely in the faucet. Could be debris in the cartridge - if there isn't a trap at the intakes, that tends to be where stuff collects. See if you can find a manual for your brand of faucet, they're sometimes relatively easy to get to and remove to clean out (Turn water off first!).

Replacing the plumbing connections to the faucet is generally easy. It's everything else that makes it a pain. If it's been in there for a while, you may have rusty old stubborn bolts holding it in place from the bottom that are hard to reach. They sell "basin wrenches" specifically to get at these bolts. Remember to pick up plumbers putty to make the bead around the top of the sink to seal it where it penetrates.

GREAT post by Ken above. I ran into a slow leak from the valve after turning it back on. Tightening the valve down a little took care of it, but you have to be sure to use TWO wrenches to tighten it (One to hold the back in place, the other to turn) or you can risk breaking the pipe behind the wall.

Another tip - In addition to having the recommended bucket, place a towel along the back of the cabinet so water that inevitably drips around you doesn't go down the crack between the cabinet and the wall where you can't easily dry it (dark+water = mold).
--
AT&T U-Hearse - RIP Unlimited Internet 1995-2011
Rethink Billable.



Fronkman
An Apple a day keeps the doctor away
Premium
join:2003-06-23
Saint Louis, MO
reply to obeythelaw

Any galvanized plumbing running to this sink?
--
Everyone should own a Mac! Go Bucks!


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
reply to obeythelaw

Remove the aerator on the faucet and check to see if you have sufficient pressure. I had a faucet that had a low flow rate and discovered that the aerator was rated at 0.5 Gallons per minute. I changed it to a 2 Gallon per minute aerator and the apparent water pressure improved immediately. The flow rate is determined by the size of the orifice in the aerator.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to obeythelaw

Try replacing the faucet diverter valve.



tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:5

A backflush is pretty easy and you dont have to disassemble anything..

First, turn off the hot water at the heater, then open a basement hot faucet till the water goes dead. Leave full open.

Then drain the hot from the kitchen by leaving it open for 10-15secs. Wet a rag, then layer it over the aerator, and apply pressure. Turn the faucet from hot to 'warm' (hot and cold). This will put cold pressure back into the hot, and backflush any crap built up. Run for 30secs.

If that doesnt change anything, surgery is required. heh

Also make sure both your shutoff valves are 100% open. Cycle them on/off with water running.

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)



obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ

1 recommendation

reply to obeythelaw

I didn't post any pictures because I decided to just replace the faucet altogether. Based on the tips here, it was a piece of cake! Had the old faucet and the new installed in about 30 minutes.



Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by obeythelaw:

I didn't post any pictures because I decided to just replace the faucet altogether. Based on the tips here, it was a piece of cake! Had the old faucet and the new installed in about 30 minutes.

Did that solve the pressure issue?


TheMole

join:2001-12-06
USA

1 recommendation

reply to obeythelaw

I had the same problem. I replaced the faucet and that solved it. The new faucet is much nicer and was (surprisingly) easy to install.
--
(1) It's either 99¢ or $0.99; not .99¢ (2) It's "so MUCH fun" not "so fun"



obeythelaw
Premium
join:2003-04-16
Bayonne, NJ
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Draiman

Yes! As I was removing all of the stuff from under my sink, I noticed that the "nuts" that get screwed onto the hot and cold fixtures were cracked and just laying on the floor. I probably could have just bought two new ones for a few bucks but the new faucet is much nicer and works great. I can only guess that by virtue of them having broken off the old faucet that it caused the pressure loss I was seeing. I used the same "water hose" connections because they seemed fine. So it couldn't have been them.


JEDCLAMPIT

join:2007-11-19
Coraopolis, PA

The inlet/s to the actual faucet are usually screened to prevent debris (scale) from damaging the valve assembly, by replacing the faucet you replaced the restriction which caused the low flow and resultant pressure drop.
I really don't think the external fixture (mounting?) nuts could affect flow.Was there water leaking below?