dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
6
share rss forum feed

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA
reply to DrStrangLov

Re: [Exede] $9.99/GB if you want more

said by DrStrangLov:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
...
...
This paper is organized into three sections. The first section
examines how residential consumers use their broadband service
and classifies consumers into four distinct broadband use
profiles.

See: Exhibit 9:

Actual Download Speed Demands (Mbps) by Different Content and Application Types

PS: Broadband - The cable modem was the first broadband option available... »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband

The executive summary has little to do with this conversation. It has to do with the overall study, yet the study includes sections with dial-up data. That would mean the executive summary conflicts with the actual report. Although this should be of no surprise coming from the FCC.

Exhibit 9 has nothing to do with this conversation. No one is questioning the bandwidth these services can provide. What matters is the actual usage the services provide and the ridiculously priced $10 per GB.

Whether or not the cable modem was first is again irrelevant to this conversation. However, according the old definition of broadband, I am pretty sure BISDN came out years before the cable modem.

said by DrStrangLov:

"At the prevailing growth rates discussed below,
consumers on average could use close to
..."

Two big assumptions...

I don't get it. What are the two big assumptions?

said by DrStrangLov:

Oh, with that beam stuffing on Spaceway 3, they have "higher speeds" during primetime?

PS: Hughes used leased transponders...Wildblue came out with a dedicated satellite, then Hughes came out with their bird. Then ViaSat bought Wildblue, and came out with ViaSat-1...then Hughes got a clone of ViaSat-1.

I do not think any satellite service up until now has provided their advertised speeds during primetime. I know WildBlue sure did not.

I do not remember Anik F2 being a "dedicated" Wildblue satellite when Wildblue launched.

said by DrStrangLov:

Would you like to point to a valid reference?

Sure thing! Right from Viasat's website:

ViaSat-1 to offer 12 Mbps download service packages to approximately 1 million subscribers

»www.viasat.com/broadband-satelli···viasat-1

DrStrangLov

join:2012-03-28

said by silbaco:

The executive summary has little to do with this conversation.

Dialup is not broadband, period! Sorry, but on this point, one has bit the dust.

Re: Two big assumptions...

I don't get it. What are the two big assumptions?

1. prevailing growth rates discussed below

2. consumers on average could use close to

Note - Sorry, but streaming media like Netflix does not count for satellite users; hence, higher usage data would assume today that Netflix usage would be counted. Thus, more skewed data that's not relevant on satellite. Just ask any typical Hughes user what happens when Netflix is streamed in HD; as in, you can't see it all.

I do not remember Anik F2 being a "dedicated" Wildblue satellite when Wildblue launched.

Check out the lease terms....WB and Telesat are "buddies" when Anik-F2 launched...partners.

Sure thing! Right from Viasat's website:

Uh...that's PR...Public Relations....from an engineer's viewpoint

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA

said by DrStrangLov:

Dialup is not broadband, period! Sorry, but on this point, one has bit the dust.

I never said it was.

said by DrStrangLov:

Note - Sorry, but streaming media like Netflix does not count for satellite users; hence, higher usage data would assume today that Netflix usage would be counted. Thus, more skewed data that's not relevant on satellite. Just ask any typical Hughes user what happens when Netflix is streamed in HD; as in, you can't see it all.

Sure it counts. The fact that satellite services cap so heavily that users can hardly use it does not make the data using it to calculate the "average" data consumed per month irrelevant to satellite services. You do not need to use HD to watch Netflix. It is just a nice bonus. A bonus that Exede will barely let their users enjoy. HughesNet's new customers will be able to enjoy it though. They may end up only being able to enjoy it during the unlimited period, but that is 5 more hours per day they will have the luxury. Or they will be able to do their downloads during the free period and use their daily usage for Netflix. Exede customers won't be able to do this.

said by DrStrangLov:

Check out the lease terms....WB and Telesat are "buddies" when Anik-F2 launched...partners.

Does not matter if they are buddies or not. They do not own Anik-F2, making them no better than HughesNet.

said by DrStrangLov:

Uh...that's PR...Public Relations....from an engineer's viewpoint

Irrelevant.

DrStrangLov

join:2012-03-28

said by silbaco:

Re: Streaming

Sure it counts.

Very few Exede folks will experience it during normal viewing hours...not a relevant data point for satellite user data usage. Of course, even fewer Hughes folks will experience it, and maybe none for a HD movie during normal viewing hours, for most all folks.

Statistics must be based in reality, not a person's fantasy.

They do not own Anik-F2, making them no better than HughesNet.

Well now, Telesat does not "own" ViaSat-1...much ado about nothing. Wildblue entered into a long term agreement...have you noticed many beams are in US territory...not a coincidence.


n1581j

@wildblue.net

Very few Exede folks will experience it during normal viewing hours...not a relevant data point for satellite user data usage.

You have to be kidding. With the crap on during normal viewing hours how did Netflix not provide not 1 but 2 billion viewing hours


DrStrangLov

join:2012-03-28
reply to silbaco

said by silbaco:

ViaSat-1 to offer 12 Mbps download service packages to approximately 1 million subscribers

»www.viasat.com/broadband-satelli···viasat-1

Footnotes - "Hughes estimates that, depending on the mix of subscriber packages, it can load 600,000 subscribers onto Spaceway-3. The company is adjusting the speed at which it places new customers on the Ka-band satellite so that it is not fully loaded before Jupiter is operational. Jupiter, which in terms of raw throughput is 10 times the size of Spaceway 3, is expected to accommodate between 1.5 million and 2 million subscribers, Kaul said, given the fact that average bandwidth demand per subscriber is increasing."
»www.spacenews.com/satellite_tele···hes.html

Well now, whose is going to stuff beams, the most?