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aknisley

join:2004-07-14
Keokuk, IA

[Equipment] wifi equipment mounting-top or bottom

After my second trip to the top of our tower to replace some equipment, I am thinking of mounting all the radios at the bottom of the tower and running coax to antennas. I have gone through the loss calculations and seems like can still get enough signal in and out to do the job.
Any one doing this?

Right now using Mikrotik RB and 2.4/5.8 card into 90 deg sector.



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:5

Not necessarily an issue if you use the proper coax.

I would recommend this as a minimum:

»www.rfparts.com/heliax_LDF550A.html

Make sure you address the grounding issues particular to this type of installation.
--
Right is right, even if everyone is against it; and wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it - William Penn


Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
reply to aknisley

Done it a few times. 7/8's heliax for 2.4GHz and 5/8's heliax
For 5.x ghz.

I have also done 1-1/4" heliax for 1.4 ghz runs.



TomS_
Git-r-done
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-19
London, UK
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to aknisley

My suggestion would be to address the issues that are causing the equipment failures instead.

Running coax from top to bottom will increase the cost of your deployments, and probably increase the attractiveness of your tower to copper theifs when they see big fat cables running top to bottom, so keep that in mind.

If your equipment is failing due to water ingress or temperature, work out better ways to seal it up or cool it down.

If the feeder cables are being damaged by the environment or wildlife, find a better way to protect them.

And so on and so forth.



WHT

join:2010-03-26
Rosston, TX
kudos:5
reply to aknisley

I agree with Tom. Address why you have to replace the radios in the first place.

If it's lightning or ESD related to lack of adequate bonding to a common ground, then mounting the radios at the base only means it will be easier to replace them. So if you addressed cause of the problem, you may not have to do so many replacements in the first place.



aknisley

join:2004-07-14
Keokuk, IA
reply to aknisley

Thanks. Two different radios quit for two different reasons. One was the Mikrotik 5.8 BH, undetermined reason. The other was one of the sectors. It had bad Ethernet connection. Looks like water got into the "water proof" antenna connector.


raytaylor

join:2009-07-28
kudos:1
reply to aknisley

I dont use connectorised radios now - except for rockets and sectors.
But when i do use them, i make sure i seal them up extra good with denso tape.



superdog
I Need A Drink
Premium,MVM
join:2001-07-13
Lebanon, PA
reply to aknisley

This subject has been discussed over and over again. It is on the top 10 list for sure, Lol. It has been dropping down though, as these days, everything has an internal antenna. In the early days, everything had a connector on it, coax was always laying everywhere. Your shop, service vehicle, closets........you name it and it was infested with black snakes, LMAO.

You will find that the older you get, the more attractive mounting the antennas at the top and the radio on the bottom becomes. This is especially true if the repair problem is taking place at 3AM in February.

As mentioned by the others, it has it's pros and cons. Along with the extra expense of the coax, waterproofing, proper grounding and your tower becoming a thief magnet, you also have to consider how you will attach the coax to the tower. While this is a minor issue for the most part, it is a subject with lots of opinions.

Always keep in mind that whenever you add something to a home install, tower, etc. It is one more point of failure that could make your life suck. Each connection is one more place you will have to look at in the event of a failure. The more points of failure, the longer it takes to rectify an issue when it occurs.

If you luck is anything like mine, then once you get the call for an issue, the problem will still be at the top, even WITH all the important stuff at the base. Good luck with whatever route you take.
--
»www.wavecrazy.net



aknisley

join:2004-07-14
Keokuk, IA

Thanks. If someone was going up the tower would not be a problem for me. This is a small operation and I am 64. Each time I go up, not sure I will male it back down with out help.



Inssomniak
The Glitch
Premium
join:2005-04-06
Cayuga, ON
kudos:2

said by aknisley:

Thanks. If someone was going up the tower would not be a problem for me. This is a small operation and I am 64. Each time I go up, not sure I will male it back down with out help.

I would think you can still have water problems with coax, that can make you go up the tower, and it would be expensive, Id save that money for a young chap and pay him to go up heh
--
OptionsDSL Wireless Internet
»www.optionsdsl.ca


TomS_
Git-r-done
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-19
London, UK
kudos:5
reply to superdog

Where I worked, we never climbed a tower at 3am. Outages happen, and we would schedule a service call at frist light if it was important enough (e.g. important bckhaul or business customer), otherwise during the day. IMO 3am is a bit extreme...

Too dangerous climbing a tower in low light, wet, windy, or combination of conditions. Plus I think there may have been laws against it in Aus, but I wasnt the climbing expert.


Chele

join:2003-07-23
kudos:1
reply to aknisley

We have one POP where the radios and antennas are at 30', we can't get to them without a lift. We will be bringing everything down to a more manageable height next time we get a lift for a project/job. We won't bring it down to ground level but we will bring it to maybe 15'.


jim_p_price7

join:2005-10-28
Henryetta, OK
reply to aknisley

I used to do that (radios at the bottom, cabled up to the antennas). With expensive, low-loss LMR I thought things were performing great, until I replaced one of my systems with a direct connect. Then I discovered how bad it actually was.