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ctggzg
Premium
join:2005-02-11
USA
kudos:2

[Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

Is everyone in the extended auto coverage industry a scumbag? They always mail their crap in envelopes purposely designed to look like critical communications. The one that came today says "2nd attempt", "request for immediate action - time sensitive material enclosed", and "to be opened by addressee only, please respond within five days" in all capitals. There's definitely nothing time-sensitive about it. The dealer's warranty expired a long time ago, and they only got our info from state records because the car was recently gifted between family members. They also used the perforated edges typically used for official mail.

They've gotten so blatant that they go straight into the recycling pile without a second look, but it seems like borderline fraud.



A non

@151.190.0.x

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

Sounds just like the refinancing offers I get every week.


ender7074

join:2006-11-21
Saint Louis, MO
reply to ctggzg

Simple solution: Throw it away. There's no fraud involved and its no different than any other piece of junk mail. Looks like it worked though. You opened the envelope and read the insert...
--
Does Microsoft mean small and squishy?



Gbcue
Premium
join:2001-09-30
Santa Rosa, CA
kudos:8
reply to ctggzg

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

I got that same letter two weeks ago...


ctggzg
Premium
join:2005-02-11
USA
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to ender7074

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

said by ender7074:

Simple solution: Throw it away. There's no fraud involved and its no different than any other piece of junk mail. Looks like it worked though. You opened the envelope and read the insert...

No, I didn't open it. As I said, they've gotten so exaggerated that they're easy to spot without opening.

"Fraud" is too strong a word, but there's definitely something very assholish about it. It's blatantly misleading, though I guess that's true of most advertising. I don't understand how anyone would do business with companies like this. I purposely avoid companies who stick flyers on my front door or garage too.


thegeek
Premium
join:2008-02-21
right here
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to ctggzg

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

I found the best way to deal with all the junk mail. And it doesn't involve any extra effort on my part. Some people say that you should mark it all as return to sender or something similar. Others claim the best method is to open the mail, take out the postage paid business reply envelop, stuff everything in that envelop and send it back to them and eventually they'll supposedly stop sending you stuff. Neither of those methods are guaranteed to work and require more effort on your part. But my tried and true method works 100% of the time and actually reduces the amount of effort I have to put into getting the mail.

My secret? I have my wife get the mail for me.


ctggzg
Premium
join:2005-02-11
USA
kudos:2

We actually get very little junk mail because I religiously track down the web sites of every company who mails us, click "Contact Us", and tell them to remove our address from their list. You might think my request would go into a black hole, and most people wouldn't even consider this, but absolutely EVERY time (in maybe 20 - 30 instances) they've promptly responded and done what I asked. The remaining junk mail is mostly one-time stuff like this auto warranty where the company will likely never contact us again anyway, so envelope-stuffing or emailing them makes no difference.



DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2
reply to ctggzg

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

Most people can easily tell junk from real mail. Discard it, or mark it "Return to Sender" and drop it back in the mail. There is no reason for getting torqued about it. Besides, it pays the wages of the folks who design it, print it, and deliver it. <tongue-in-cheek>People on the warpath against junk mail are killing American jobs< /tongue-in-cheek>
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to ctggzg

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

Well - problem is - it is a scam and has nothing to do with the legit 'extended auto coverage industry' though the industry is shady if it is anything besides a manufacturer extended warranty.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain



thegeek
Premium
join:2008-02-21
right here
kudos:2

Just because it is not a very good deal doesn't mean it is a scam.



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County

No - this is a well known scam that includes phone calls and letters\postcards:

»www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23147777/ns···Dg_Vw6V0

»www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consume···155.shtm

Easy to spot the scam as these things get sent to vehicles WELL out of warranty or when there is still plenty warranty left on the vehicle.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain
Expand your moderator at work


JALevinworth

@embarqhsd.net
reply to ctggzg

Re: [Rant] Fake "urgent" mail

said by ctggzg:

Is everyone in the extended auto coverage industry a scumbag? They always mail their crap in envelopes purposely designed to look like critical communications. The one that came today says "2nd attempt", "request for immediate action - time sensitive material enclosed", and "to be opened by addressee only, please respond within five days" in all capitals. There's definitely nothing time-sensitive about it. The dealer's warranty expired a long time ago, and they only got our info from state records because the car was recently gifted between family members. They also used the perforated edges typically used for official mail.

They've gotten so blatant that they go straight into the recycling pile without a second look, but it seems like borderline fraud.

Funny, I was just mentioning this scam in another thread about the Card Services robo call scam. Although the reference was to robo calls, the auto warranty scam also included mailings that were authentic looking alerts:

said by »www.ftc.gov/opa/2009/05/robocalls.shtm :
In addition to the robocalls, the FTC charged that the company selling the warranties mails out deceptive postcards to consumers, warning them about the imminent expiration of their auto warranties. The postcards are designed to mislead consumers into believing that they are being contacted by their dealer or manufacturer, and the postcards offer consumers the chance to “renew” their original warranties.

Who were so ordered:
said by »www.ftc.gov/opa/2010/03/voicetouch.shtm :
The settlement order against Voice Touch and Dunne permanently bars them from both telemarketing and assisting anyone else in telemarketing. It also bars them from making a range of misrepresentations, including:

•that they are affiliated with a consumer’s car manufacturer or dealer;
•that the consumer’s original auto warranty is about to expire;
•that they are authorized to sell, and are selling, auto warranties that will extend the original manufacturer’s warranty;
•that they are selling warranties of any kind;
the total cost to buy, receive, or use the goods or services they are selling;
•any material restrictions, limitations, or conditions on buying, receiving, or using their services;
•their refund, cancellation, exchange, or re-purchase policies; and
•the performance, effectiveness or any other key characteristics of their goods or services.
That only pertains to the above named defendants which is only part of the whole sweep, though, and there are more out there like this guy:
quote:
Some of the defendants used offshore shell corporations to try to avoid scrutiny, and a top officer in the telemarketing company bragged to prospective clients that he could operate outside the law without any chance of being caught by the FTC, the papers stated. This defendant also claimed that he makes 1.8 million dials per day and that he had done more than $40 million worth of dialing for extended warranty companies, including one billion dials on behalf of his largest client, according to the court papers filed by the FTC.
»www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/0823263/index.shtm

These a-holes are worth ranting about at least once.

-Jim


bitemeboy

join:2005-04-06
Otego, NY
reply to ctggzg

Are you all un-American? Junk mail is the backbone of our postal system!

Just think, instead of just half the postal workers sitting around doing nothing other than to suck up a paycheck, it could be three quarters! What are you thinking! To put these companies out of business would wreak havoc on our economy.

Stop your knee-jerk reactions. Look at the big picture. No scams of ANY kind and our society would crumble. In your hearts you know this to be true.
--
Hardy men...Were the Caesars...Instead of razors...They used tweezers...
Burma-Shave