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Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to FaxCap

Re: [Serious] The most honest three and a half minutes of televi

Certainly, the cultural and economic intermingling of the US and Canada is something that is pretty unique in the world. There isn't any other pair of countries in the world with a relationship that Canada and the US has. But despite that, there are definitely many things that the rest of the world would identify as uniquely American or Canadian, in addition to the many things that just get lumped together.

Culturally and economically, there is a lot of overlap. Politically, very little (although parts of the US may be more in line with Canada than others).
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms

said by Guspaz:

But despite that, there are definitely many things that the rest of the world would identify as uniquely American or Canadian, in addition to the many things that just get lumped together.

Culturally and economically, there is a lot of overlap. Politically, very little (although parts of the US may be more in line with Canada than others).

Agree fully.

QC for poutine and TX for chili.


shaner
Premium
join:2000-10-04
Calgary, AB
reply to FaxCap

Damn...no HBO Canada on TELUS Optik TV.

I'd like to watch this show.



Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

Constitutionally, the federal government can't tell provinces how to do anything for these and other issues, so the Canada Health Act merely sets forth requirements that provinces must meet in order to receive federal funds for health care.

It's worthwhile to point out that this is the same way that the United States legislated a mandatory drinking age of 21 and a drunk driving law based on 0.08 across the entire country. Prior to this, many states had a drinking age of 18 and a drunk driving BAC of 0.10. The feds tied highway funding to those two requirements, and if a state didn't implement laws based on that drinking age and that BAC they wouldn't receive funding.

To this day each state can set the drinking age and max BAC to whatever they want, they just loose their highway funding. Medicare in Canada is the same, a province could set up whatever funding and insurance model they want and there's nothing the feds could do to stop them. Alberta and Ontario both seriously flirted with the idea in the 90s, for what it's worth.

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to FFH

said by FFH:

You do realize this is a FICTIONAL show, written by some liberal writer in Hollywood who enjoy nothing better than running down America.

Which 'America' do you speak of - North America, Central America, or South America?

Once you've defined that, which country do you refer to?

Since you are fast-n-loose with specifics it is no wonder that you choose to disparage those who use FACTS to make their thesis.

Republican politicians (President, Vice-President, Congress) and Supreme Court justices have done a remarkable job at running the USA into the ground these past 12 years.


FaxCap

join:2002-05-25
Surrey, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to PX Eliezer7

said by PX Eliezer7:

But the whole premise of that TV show scene is a fraud, a setup, a con.

Forget the TV show....it was just a door opener.

Let's look at your Wild West style (read GREED) banking/financial
system. The unregulated greed of your banking/financial system has
damn near brought the world to it's knees. There are a few hundred
men in the USA who should be doing 50 year at hard labour.

I think I can make this generalization without too much flak from my
fellow Canadians..."I will NEVER EVER trust the American financial
system again". The only way I would is if they brought back tough
regulation. And this is coming from a guy who got out in time. I
lost very little in 2008/09 because of a few good men in the USA
who wrote believable articles about the impending sub prime fiasco.
Yes, commi-pinko liberal writers saved my ass. Same kind of people
who wrote this HBO show.

The world will never truly trust the US banking system again.

FaxCap


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to MaynardKrebs

said by MaynardKrebs:

Supreme Court justices have done a remarkable job at running the USA into the ground these past 12 years.

While slightly off-topic, nothing brings me more pleasure than seeing hard-core conservative Chief Justice John Roberts ruling in ways that have made the constituency that supported him completely turn against him.


Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8

That's because they don't understand his strategy -- there's a method to his madness -- and it does not bode well for the future.



Rob
In Deo speramus.
Premium
join:2001-08-25
Kendall, FL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

I will never, in my life, understand the American debate on health care reform. Almost every developed nation has some form of universal healthcare, and wouldn't give it up, but the US is acting like it's the end of the world...

That's because a very small percentage of Americans (under 20%) do not have insurance, so pushing for healthcare reform, for many Americans isn't at the top of their list.

For the 80% that has insurance, we have no problem. We go to the doctor, we get seen, our insurance pays, and we go on with our lives. For many of us, visits to the doctor is once a year for a check up.

Despite what you think, healthcare isn't a big topic in the U.S. for the bulk of us who are OK.

I'm not saying that we shouldn't help the 20% that don't have insurance, but the reality is that for the 80%, we have more pressing matters to worry about that affect us more immediately.
--
CheckSite.us | YourIP.us | Reverseip.us

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to FaxCap

said by FaxCap:

Let's look at your Wild West style (read GREED) banking/financial
system. The unregulated greed of your banking/financial system has
damn near brought the world to it's knees. There are a few hundred
men in the USA who should be doing 50 year at hard labour.

As someone who works in/around the financial world for many years and has been involved in the regulation making process, the trading and risk management world, and in designing systems to take advantage of minute discrepancies in prices, the single worst feature of the last 25 years has been financial deregulation.

Human nature is what it is - filled with greed, avarice, and corner-cutting, and probably no more so than when it comes to money. Regulation is designed to temper those base instincts.

Most jurisdictions got it wrong in deregulating - none more than the USA. The repeal of Glass-Steagall and the changing of the rules of the CFTC in the late 90's was more Republican instigated than it was Democrat inspired - even though Clinton signed the damn bills.

Clinton was politically weak at the time, largely due to the incessant focus of US legislators and the press on 'Zippergate' rather than on what was truly important. Zippergate was really between Bill & Hilary - everything else surrounding it was a sideshow - except to Republican politicians. Clinton signed the legislation because he needed to get Congress off his back as much as possible.

So a decade goes by of deregulation, along with further evisceration of the bodies whose mandate it is to regulate, coupled with an unwillingness to enforce those laws which remain on the books, and cowboys take advantage of the system which remains - all the while those in charge believing that the laws of financial gravity don't apply because the Prophet of Chicago says they don't.

Even here in Canada we got the basic legislation wrong - removal of the separation of the so-called "four pillars" - banking, insurance, brokerage, trusts. But we did retain a relatively stronger regulator in OSFI. However, the various provincial securities legislators are jokes for resisting the call to merge into a national regulator - all because of turf wars.

People call some banks "too big to fail".
That's not what they are - they are too big to exist.
They should be broken up by the reinstatement of Glass-Steagall, and other forced divestitures.

I'd much rather work for a pure broker - taking my cut of the profits in a partnership with other like-minded individuals, whose own net worth is on the line every day, than to work for a bureaucrat banker whose worldview is tempered by the assinine questions an Aunt Mille will ask at the AGM and how his answer will apper on the evening news.

I'd much rather have many more smaller commercial banks competing for my business as a businessperson, than to be denied loans by the 5 big games in town (yes, I know that there are more than that - it's an allegory, ok?).

I'd rather know that my insurance company isn't investing my life insurance premiums in credit default swaps or CMO's that they don't know anything about (seen it), to be told what they're worth only by the dealer that packaged them in the first place (see that too), who didn't correctly model the package in the first place (seen that too many times), or who constructed it for their own benefit -- not that of their customers (oh yes, I've seen that too).

Anyway, I could go on for hours.
Suffice it to say that we're in a big mess globally and if we manage to stumble our way out it will be by sheer luck. Throw in a hot war with Iran (assign your own probability here x.xx) and the global economy will hit the shitter faster than a speeding bullet. Canada is not immue - we're better off than most, but we are unable to absorb much more stress.


Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
reply to Rob

said by Rob:

That's because a very small percentage of Americans (under 20%) do not have insurance, so pushing for healthcare reform, for many Americans isn't at the top of their list.

For the 80% that has insurance, we have no problem.

I don't want to digress this thread into what is in itself obviously a huge topic, but I will just make this one simple statement about health care. As big as the moral issues and the ER abuses and cost issues are that are a consequence of the uninsured, that is nowhere near the entire problem. The systemic inability to control costs, the ongoing bankruptcies of people who are insured (or thought they were -- medical costs are the single largest cause of personal bankruptcies in the US, and most of those people had insurance), and the insidious intrusion of insurance bureaucracy between doctor and patient -- these are huge problems that affect virtually everyone. Americans often don't see this or fully appreciate how deeply it affects them because they generally have a very poor understanding of how health care works in other countries.
--
"Whether we and our politicians know it or not, Nature is party to all our deals and decisions, and she has more votes, a longer memory, and a sterner sense of justice than we do." --Wendell Berry


J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..
reply to FaxCap

said by FaxCap:

said by FFH:

You do realize this is a FICTIONAL show, written by some liberal writer in Hollywood who enjoy nothing better than running down America.

Gosh dang...I thunk this was reel.

FaxCap

It is reel...movie reel.
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein


J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
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Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..
reply to Rob

said by Rob:

For the 80% that has insurance, we have no problem. We go to the doctor, we get seen, our insurance pays, and we go on with our lives. For many of us, visits to the doctor is once a year for a check up.

Watching some American TV, the concern isn't always that do not have insurance, but those that do that end up getting screwed by the HMO. People being declined due to pre-existing conditions, people reaching their ceiling before treatment ends, high co-pays, certain services not being included...for that 80%, likely 80% will never have issues so serious they have to claim bankruptcy or die, but 20% will have issues..maybe more. So to suggest that 80% of the population has "no problem", that would be patently incorrect. I have relatives that live in the USA, some moved for legal reason (escape child support, so to escape a crazy as hell family) but they never understood the US healthcare system.

Biggest issue is Canada is having to wait for non-life threatening procedures. If you have a serious enough issue, you will be seen right away, you will get an MRI within 2 hours, you won't be allowed to leave the emergency room because they already booked you for the OR in 5 hours. On the other hand, if the issue is non life threatening, or they need to confirm a life threatening issue that cannot be fixed, then things slow down. (example, I have a friend that needed an MRI to check for ALS, Lou Gehrig's Disease, but that has no real treatment)
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein


weasel words

@videotron.ca

1 edit
reply to Rob

said by Rob:

1. That's because a very small percentage of Americans (under 20%) do not have insurance, so pushing for healthcare reform, for many Americans isn't at the top of their list.

2. For the 80% that has insurance, we have no problem. We go to the doctor, we get seen, our insurance pays, and we go on with our lives. For many of us, visits to the doctor is once a year for a check up.

3. Despite what you think, healthcare isn't a big topic in the U.S. for the bulk of us who are OK.

I'm not saying that we shouldn't help the 20% that don't have insurance, but the reality is that for the 80%, we have more pressing matters to worry about that affect us more immediately.

1. 2010 stats show that due to the economic depression 900,000 more people were left without healthcare coverage ring the total to 49.9 million people without any healthcare coverage.

That is more than the entire population of Canada.

Sure seems very significant to me.

In addition, the economic downturn has increased since 2010 for the states and that number has now risen for the worse.

2. Quite the wild claim. Very wild. Matter of fact it's pure BS. Are you saying that out of the 80% of the population of America most all of that 80% need to see a doctor only once a year? Let me see... Yup. You said that.

No aging population in the states. No disease. WOW!

Now how about also including some fact with your american fantasy world? Something like... how 55% (2010 figures) rely on their employer for health coverage and how that 55% has now dropped even more because of employers cutting benefits to save money since then. Oh, but let us dance in your make believe world where everyone (except 50-million people and climbing have nothing. This also includes kids).

3. I believe your made in america fantasy is starting to show cracks because I do think the children, the elderly, those working their asses off and those making less than $25K a year do indeed see it as a big topic. Including the rich employers who are cutting the healthcare benefits. Despite what you think. Despite your wild fantasy.

4. What does all this have to do with the "most Honest 3.5 minutes"? Besides, you couldn't put up an honest post without adding your make believe propaganda.

[deleted]


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to Wolfie00

said by Wolfie00:

The systemic inability to control costs

It's a good thing that doctors in Canada work at a socialist wage and accept pigs and eggs as payment, so costs will never go up for those paying for their services.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4

said by urbanriot:

It's a good thing that doctors in Canada work at a socialist wage and accept pigs and eggs as payment, so costs will never go up for those paying for their services.

If you want to see a country that truly pays a "socialist wage" to doctors, look at the UK. Comparatively speaking, they work for peanuts over there.

PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
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Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms
reply to FaxCap

said by FaxCap:

The unregulated greed of your banking/financial system has damn near brought the world to it's knees. There are a few hundred men in the USA who should be doing 50 year at hard labour.

No argument from me there, although I think there are people in the UK and in a few European countries to whom that also applies.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to FaxCap

Welp, I'm on the fourth of the first four episodes right now. After watching this and seeing the way they've painted Jeff Daniel's character to be a pompous asshole who's got a hardon for trying to find his version of the truth, I can't help but think he's based on Keith Olbermann, regardless of what Aaron Sorkin says.



urbanriot
Premium
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Canada
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Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

said by Gone:

said by urbanriot:

It's a good thing that doctors in Canada work at a socialist wage and accept pigs and eggs as payment, so costs will never go up for those paying for their services.

If you want to see a country that truly pays a "socialist wage" to doctors, look at the UK. Comparatively speaking, they work for peanuts over there.

I know many doctors in many countries but I don't think I know any in the UK. I have a friend that's a neuro surgeon in Buenes Ares and he said he's paid peanuts as well, but he said he loves the relaxed way of life, the weather... and the women.

said by Gone:

I can't help but think he's based on Keith Olbermann, regardless of what Aaron Sorkin says.

Aaron Sorkin says a lot of things, mostly the same thing over and over -

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=S78RzZr3IwI


»www.theglobeandmail.com/life/the···4374974/



Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4

said by urbanriot:

I know many doctors in many countries but I don't think I know any in the UK. I have a friend that's a neuro surgeon in Buenes Ares and he said he's paid peanuts as well, but he said he loves the relaxed way of life, the weather... and the women.

I believe they - they UK - are the "worst paid" in the entire G8, though they certainly make more than someone in Cuba would.

But like you just said, there's more to life than just money.

Warez_Zealot

join:2006-04-19
Vancouver

1 edit
reply to FaxCap

America was never the greatest country in the world. That was just a sales pitch back when they wanted immigrants.

It's not the worst country in the world by any means either. Tossing it in the top 20 seems about right though.


Warez_Zealot

join:2006-04-19
Vancouver
reply to FaxCap

said by FaxCap:

said by PX Eliezer7:

But the whole premise of that TV show scene is a fraud, a setup, a con.

Forget the TV show....it was just a door opener.

Let's look at your Wild West style (read GREED) banking/financial
system. The unregulated greed of your banking/financial system has
damn near brought the world to it's knees. There are a few hundred
men in the USA who should be doing 50 year at hard labour.

I think I can make this generalization without too much flak from my
fellow Canadians..."I will NEVER EVER trust the American financial
system again". The only way I would is if they brought back tough
regulation. And this is coming from a guy who got out in time. I
lost very little in 2008/09 because of a few good men in the USA
who wrote believable articles about the impending sub prime fiasco.
Yes, commi-pinko liberal writers saved my ass. Same kind of people
who wrote this HBO show.


The world will never truly trust the US banking system again.

FaxCap

Haha, I gotta laugh when I read that stuff. To me that means either you lost your shirt or you never had anything in the market. I was just reading that in 2013-14 will be the next implosion (or approx 3-5 years).

»www.marketwatch.com/story/how-be···_popular
--
"You're not supposed to be so blind with patriotism that you can't face reality. Wrong is wrong, no matter who says it."-Malcolm X



Rob
In Deo speramus.
Premium
join:2001-08-25
Kendall, FL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Wolfie00

Wolfie, totally agree. But to say that costs is an issue only seen in the U.S. is a pretty far stretch. Other countries are controlling costs by limiting services, which is something I wouldn't want to see in this country.
--
CheckSite.us | YourIP.us | Reverseip.us



Rob
In Deo speramus.
Premium
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Kendall, FL
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Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to J E F F

Jeff, I meant in present time. 80% are people who have insurance and are happy with it, people who are happy to at least have insurance, or people who are in a battle with the insurance, but thankful to have some form of insurance. More pressing for now is jobs. Without jobs, there will be no insurance, no ability to pay house payment, etc.
--
CheckSite.us | YourIP.us | Reverseip.us



Rob
In Deo speramus.
Premium
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Kendall, FL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to weasel words

20% of our population is about 60 million. In case you haven't figured it out, we have 300+ million people (yes, many millions more than Canada has a whole).

If you look at the 20% breakdown, you'll find that it's majority of it is made up of individuals who can afford but do not purchase insurance (an area that AHA has fixed by penalizing them), includes illegal immigrants (either entered or overstayed their visa), or those on a travel/work visa that wouldn't be eligible for insurance anyways. Then you have those who lost their job and can't afford insurance (I'll take your 2010 # of 1 million people).

1 million people vs 80% (~240 million).. which is why for majority healthcare reform isnt a hot topic. As Wolfie pointed out, we have a cost control issue, but when 80% are not involved in the "behind" the scenes, then they don't know.

Yes, for many of those insured, we see our doctors when we do our physical checkups (or for woman, pap and mammograms). When we're not feeling well, we head to the pharmacy for some advice on what to take. If it progresses, then we hit up the doctor.
--
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elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
Premium
join:2006-08-30
Somewhere in
kudos:2
Reviews:
·VMedia
reply to Rob

said by Rob:but the reality is that for the 80%, we have more pressing matters to worry about that affect us more immediately.
[/BQUOTE :

And that is preciseley the point, those who have it, can afford health insurance, don't give a flying frig about those that can't.

To quote Marie Antoinette "Qu'ils mangent de la brioche" .
--
No, I didn't. Honest... I ran out of gas. I... I had a flat tire. I didn't have enough money for cab fare. My tux didn't come back from the cleaners. An old friend came in from out of town. Someone stole my car. There was an earthquake.......



elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
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Somewhere in
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Reviews:
·VMedia
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

said by Wolfie00:

The systemic inability to control costs

It's a good thing that doctors in Canada work at a socialist wage and accept pigs and eggs as payment, so costs will never go up for those paying for their services.

You forgot the Cows. They take cows too.
--
No, I didn't. Honest... I ran out of gas. I... I had a flat tire. I didn't have enough money for cab fare. My tux didn't come back from the cleaners. An old friend came in from out of town. Someone stole my car. There was an earthquake.......


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
reply to FaxCap

I was going to post about how I like the show, but I see the thread has gone to hell.


IamGimli

join:2004-02-28
Canada
kudos:2
reply to PX Eliezer7

said by PX Eliezer7:

But the whole premise of that TV show scene is a fraud, a setup, a con.

Actually I don't think you understand what the actual premise of the show is at all.

The ACTUAL premise of the show is that news (particularly political news but all news in general) has gone away from their duty to inform towards a more entertaining presentation based on opinions and emotions instead of facts and information because of the commercialization of news programs. Journalists are no longer involved in news; news are done by entertainers now.

In the show, the star anchor (played by Jeff Daniels), his executive producer and his station manager try to change this by going to a fact-based format and upholding journalistic integrity against the wishes of the entertainment conglomerate that actually owns the station.

The way they're doing it is actually quite interesting as they "replay" significant events of the last few years (such as the BP oil spill and rep. Giffords' shooting in the first few episodes), highlighting the "infotainment" version as it was broadcast on American airwaves at the time and introducing their own version in contrast.

In itself, the show is fairly a-political.


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
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Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

1 recommendation

said by IamGimli:

Actually I don't think you understand what the actual premise of the show is at all.

Agreed. Now we've got another "Canada is the best place on earth" thread combined with the classic "USA suckz!!!".

Mind you, the OP started that with his ignorant appraisal of the show with its fictional presentation of America, which is worse than his belief of what happens in Canada.

said by IamGimli:

The ACTUAL premise of the show is that news (particularly political news but all news in general) has gone away from their duty to inform towards a more entertaining presentation based on opinions and emotions instead of facts and information because of the commercialization of news programs. Journalists are no longer involved in news; news are done by entertainers now.

Even worse than that, the population seems to prefer the news from entertainers. I know more people in their 20's and 30's that receive the 'news' only from The Daily Show and the Colbert Report. "Pick up a newspaper? Why? It's not funny." As far as they're concerned, 60 minutes is an 'old peoples show' (which has been the sentiments I've heard since the 80's)