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sapman986

join:2004-08-26
Fort Lee, NJ

Pulling CAT6 in an old house for new FIOS speeds?

After reading the requirements here for upgrading to some of the higher speeds offered by Verizon, it seems that I need to get CAT6 pulled.

Currently I use coax to connect the router to another actiontec router(acting as a bridge) using MOCA to give wired and wifi coverage where needed in the house. The house is nearly 100 years old and had coax pulled extensively when it was renovated before I bought it.

I'd really like to get CAT6 pulled, but i'm not even sure where to look for this for a residential job. Who does this kind of work? I'm in Bergen County, NJ

McBane

join:2008-08-22
Plano, TX
A lot of A/V companies and electricians will do this, there are also specialized network wiring companies who will do it, you'll just have to check local contractors on somewhere like angie's list or google for ethernet or network wiring companies in your area. I used to have a few on hand who did this in Dallas when I installed T1s and they would complain the smartjack is not where they wanted the router and we weren't responsible for internal wiring.

It was usually around $60 - $80 per pull/socket, but that was 7 - 10 years ago so no telling what it is now.

lijacobs

join:2010-07-30
Lawrence, NY
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to sapman986
Cat5 is good for up to gigabit ethernet. That being said, the expensive part of the installation is the labor cost not the wire cost. So if it will make you feel better go for cat6. Most licensed electricians in the NY/NJ metropolitan area are trained to run ethernet wiring for you.

sapman986

join:2004-08-26
Fort Lee, NJ
I thought it was CAT5e that was good for Gigabit Ethernet, not CAT5?


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
said by sapman986:

I thought it was CAT5e that was good for Gigabit Ethernet, not CAT5?

Correct.

tnsprin

join:2003-07-23
Bradenton, FL
kudos:1
Cat 5 might work for very short runs, but a minimum fo cat5e is recommended for anything else. Go with Cat 6 if you have the option.

sapman986

join:2004-08-26
Fort Lee, NJ
reply to sapman986
If I went for one of the >100Mbps (down) bundles, I think I need to use ethernet to take full advantage of the speed for my networked devices.

Can I continue to use coax/MOCA for the STBs, but only use ethernet for wherever I have an RJ45 socket pulled? Or would everything including the STBs have to use ethernet?

McBane

join:2008-08-22
Plano, TX
As long as the fios router is still connected to the coax (For LAN, WAN would be ethernet on 100+ plans) the STBs will continue to get their info over coax via the actiontec/westell. You would have to make an ethernet run from the ONT to wherever you keep your fios router though for it to get out to the internet.

sapman986

join:2004-08-26
Fort Lee, NJ
Thanks for the advice so far.

I guess I am trying to avoid making ethernet runs to rooms that only need STBs, while still being able to get the >100Mbps speeds in rooms that do. Seems like that is not an option.

So, assuming that I am going to need an ethernet socket in every room currently served by coax (4 STBs and the main Actiontec router) and any other rooms where I want an ethernet socket (3 other rooms), is my best bet to have the following connection?

ONT->Actiontec Router->Switch->Ethernet Sockets->Devices (STBs, Wired connections, Wireless APs etc.)


Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT
Just curious, but what is your switch and router? Most home routers can't handle FIOS speeds. Most can't even handle a 30x5.


More Fiber
Premium,MVM
join:2005-09-26
West Chester, PA
kudos:32
reply to sapman986
said by sapman986:

So, assuming that I am going to need an ethernet socket in every room currently served by coax (4 STBs and the main Actiontec router)

The STBs can only be connected via coax.
Even though the STBs have a RJ45 jack, it is not supported.
--
There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don't.


mr_slick

join:2003-05-22
Lynnwood, WA
reply to sapman986
for what it's worth i run gigabit speeds with no problem over regular cheap ass cat5 that i ran a decade ago-- some of that being some even older cable i got from my prior job that was probably from the 90s and had kinks and damage to it.

i get ~95-110MB/sec transfers between my server and main box going through a router and switch with about 200 feet of cable.

your mileage may vary- but it wouldn't hurt to see what speeds you can get before spending on upgrades.

another note-- i only can speak of internal LAN transfer speeds since i only have the 35/35 plan (which i do get full speeds on).

EDIT:: i will add that none of my setup is over coax (thought i'd add that after re-reading the OP)

guyjr

join:1999-08-30
USA
reply to sapman986
I've been thinking of doing the same thing in our old 100+ year old home as well, but have mainly been approaching this from a DIY perspective. I never even considered just hiring an electrician to do the work, and at $100 for one run, that might just be the best bet.

So... if I do decide to do this myself, my main run needs to go from the basement, where the ONT is, to the 3rd floor office / attic space, where pretty much all the computers in the house live, as well as the primary router. I've already got a decent MOCA bridge setup as a second node on the 1st floor, with a Netgear switch hanging off that to drive the home A/V stack, and a drop into the basement from the MOCA router to another NG switch to power whatever I decide to put down there in the future (currently just one old XP PC). If I instead do an ethernet run between the basement and attic, then everything can be on the same gigabit network, and as soon as Verizon turns up the Quantum speeds in my neighborhood (local CO is not fully "quantized" yet for some reason, maxing out at the 50/25 plan), I'll be ready with the internal wiring needed to run from the ONT to the primary router.

What I've been thinking of doing is running Cat 5e (or possibly 6) along the same path that a steam pipe currently travels from the basement all the way up to the 3rd floor radiator. I figure a small hole in the ceiling / floor of each floor would allow me to pass some heat resistant tubing behind the pipe (there is space between the hot pipe and wall in each room), and inside that would run the ethernet. Then I'd just need to seal up around each hole, and then probably paint the tube the same color as the wall in each room to help hide the new run.

Any thoughts / comments on that idea?


More Fiber
Premium,MVM
join:2005-09-26
West Chester, PA
kudos:32
said by guyjr:

So... if I do decide to do this myself, my main run needs to go from the basement, where the ONT is, to the 3rd floor office / attic space, where pretty much all the computers in the house live, as well as the primary router.

If I instead do an ethernet run between the basement and attic, then everything can be on the same gigabit network

If I understand you correctly, you'll need 2 cat5 runs from the basement to the 3rd floor.
•One for your WAN connection from the ONT to the router.
•One for your LAN connection back down to the basement.
You can't run your WAN and LAN connections over the same cable.

I was able to get an electrician to make the cat5 runs for $50 per drop as long as he didn't have to terminate the cables. If you can terminate the cables yourself, you can probably save yourself some money.
--
There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don't.


mr_slick

join:2003-05-22
Lynnwood, WA
reply to sapman986
i will add that if you are planning on running cable (the OP or others) you might as well use cat6 since the price difference is minimal.

guyjr

join:1999-08-30
USA
reply to More Fiber
said by More Fiber:

If I understand you correctly, you'll need 2 cat5 runs from the basement to the 3rd floor.
•One for your WAN connection from the ONT to the router.
•One for your LAN connection back down to the basement.

Ah, yes, that is true. I think in that case it would make sense to move the router into the basement, as I've already got a couple NG switches on the 3rd floor. Thanks for pointing that out!


wa2ibm
Premium
join:2000-10-10
San Jose, CA
Since we're talking about wiring a multi-story house for Ethernet, I thought I'd pass along some experience that I've had.

I have several NetGear Gig-E Layer 2 switches (GS-724T), one in the main wiring room, one in the upstairs office (where my server and several other machines are), and another in the downstairs heater closet (that feeds my primary workstation, the ethernet-connected TV and Blu-Ray boxes, and the master BR).

Initially, I'd run one CAT-5e from the main wiring closet to each of the other two switches. However, I found that when moving large files from a machine connected to the downstairs switch to the server connected to the office switch, that there was some slowdown along the way. It helped when I ran a second cable along with the first, with the ports defined as a trunk group. Apparently when there's other traffic between switches, there's some contention for that one cable and having two cables in a trunk group reduces that contention.

Oh, and BTW, you CAN run WAN and LAN on the same (trunk) cable, provided you have layer 2 switches on each end and define the WAN and LAN circuits as different VLANs. I do that with a 4th switch in the (relatively cool) garage where I have a gig-e NAS box sitting next to my DSL modem that's right behind the NID. The NAS box and modem are connected to different ports on an 8-port NG switch that are on different VLANs. If I had an ONT (Fios not available here), I'd have it connected to that switch as well.
--
- Bill