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Borad

join:2012-06-08

How do you crimp?

Click for full size
I have a pack of old coaxial connectors that says to crimp twice and it specifies the rings to crimp. I had no problem with that, but I just bought a pack of connectors at Home Depot (pictured) and I don't know what to do. Should I just crimp at the number 2 or should I crimp 1 and 3? I don't have the IDEAL crimp tool mentioned. Home Depot didn't even have it. I have the right size crimper though.

(And if I could sneak in a complaint, they should make plastic coaxial staples with masonry nails in white, but I searched and it doesn't look like they do.)

westdc

join:2009-01-25
Amissville, VA
kudos:1
Suggest you take them back and get compression fittings.

»www.amazon.com/PPC-Outdoor-Compr···fittings

ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
reply to Borad
+1

And invest in a good compression tool.


tschmidt
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1 edit
reply to westdc
said by westdc:

Suggest you take them back and get compression fittings.

I agree compression F connectors are better but they require a rather expensive tool.

To the OP, since the instructions say to crimp the center of the ferrule I assume they want you to use #2.

/tom


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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reply to Borad
First thing get rid of those junk connectors.

I have found that I can install compression connectors just fine without a compression tool by using two channel lock pliers (one on each side of the connector) and squeezing them at the same time.

Best place to get cheap compression connectors when they're not sold out: »www.monoprice.com/products/produ···format=2
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CompTIA Network+ Certified

Borad

join:2012-06-08
reply to westdc
I returned them and bought crimp-ons at Radio Shack. The Radio Shack ones say which ones are for quad shield and show you where to crimp. I didn't want to spend $20 for a compression tool when I already had a crimper.

Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV
reply to Borad
To properly crimp a terminal like that you use something like this that crimps on 6 sides in a hexagon shape. Regular wire crimpers won't crimp properly.

[url]»www.bing.com/images/search?q=rg+···81[/url]


TheTechGuru

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reply to Borad
said by Borad:

I returned them and bought crimp-ons at Radio Shack. The Radio Shack ones say which ones are for quad shield and show you where to crimp. I didn't want to spend $20 for a compression tool when I already had a crimper.

Did you not read what I said? You do not need a compression tool, channel locks on both sides of a compression connector works just fine.
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Borad

join:2012-06-08
said by TheTechGuru:

Did you not read what I said? You do not need a compression tool, channel locks on both sides of a compression connector works just fine.

I didn't want to experiment with that technique. I read about crimping vs. compression. For example, this from Family Handyman:
quote:
End connectors that screw on over the outer jacket of cable can loosen up over time and even fall off. Instead, use crimp-ring style connectors and a special crimping tool (sold at home centers), or better yet, compression-style connectors.
Also, the coaxial cable in the raceway that Cablevision installed is crimped. I even read a recommendation for crimping on a package of something I saw recently, with no mention of compression. And I've read enough conflicting comments about the need for quad shield and solid copper that I'm not going to worry too much about something as easy to replace as a plug. It's not like everyone agrees on these things and can back it up.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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The industry standard is compression connectors. DirecTV, DishNetwork, and every cable company I have ever dealt with uses them exclusivly. DigiCon is what I would call the "best" brand of compression connectors.

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MgA_ODEN
Excessive
Premium
join:2002-12-28
Spring, TX
reply to Borad
Crimp #2 and get on with your life.
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Ìïëþí ëáâÝ


InTHEKnow

@charter.com
Poor connectorization and inferior cables cause 95% or more of all problems in the cable plant. Crimp on connectors fall into the above category. Please call Cablevision back and show the tech the crimp on connectors and he will correct if he doesn't get his supervisors number and call. The problem is that you could be causing problems within the whole node not just at your house. Bottom line crimp on connectors are only acceptable in an OTA antenna setup.

Borad

join:2012-06-08
said by InTHEKnow :

Please call Cablevision back and show the tech the crimp on connectors and he will correct if he doesn't get his supervisors number and call.

They probably crimped it way back when it was first installed and I doubt they'd change it without a reception problem. I can't even take a picture of it now because I got warned by building management not to remove the cover of the raceway (a neighbor heard me drilling and saw the raceway cover removed and complained).

I'd like to Crimp #2 and get on with my life but I'm waiting for permission from building management to lay the cable a certain way. Maybe they'll change their mind now that I explained things in writing to the Board of Directors, but probably not.

Borad

join:2012-06-08
reply to InTHEKnow
said by InTHEKnow :

Poor connectorization and inferior cables cause 95% or more of all problems in the cable plant. Crimp on connectors fall into the above category.

I could see why crimp-on connectors would be a problem. If you buy at Home Depot, you have to know what the "center of ferrule" is (note that "number two" in the picture is only the center of three segments that may or may not be considered the ferrule) and guess whether the connector is for quad shield or something less, and if you buy at Radio Shack, you have to guess whether the Radio Shack cable stripper will work. Here's a complaint that I tried sending to Radio Shack just as my time ran out on the library computer. I don't know if they received it, but I didn't receive an e-mail confirmation.

quote:
I bought a package of RadioShack RG-6 crimp-on connectors (278-0231) and a RadioShack cable stripper (278-248) that are supposed to work together, but they don't. The package of the stripper says "for use with RG-6" but the instructions inside say it only strips in lengths of 4, 6, 8, and 12mm, which isn't consistant with the connectors which require a 9.5mm cut exposing the wire, and a 3.2mm cut of the outter jacket and shield. I would like a refund, but I don't have the receipt for the stripper. This is false advertising.
I could make marks at the proper points on the cable and remove one of the cutters of the cable stripper, but then it wouldn't be worth $15 to me. It's supposed to be able to make both cuts at once, but there's no indication of whether the two blades could be moved close enough together for that. I'm going to use a hobby knife and lay some kind of spacers on the table to strip the cable.


r from roger

@rogers.com
said by Borad:

said by InTHEKnow :

Poor connectorization and inferior cables cause 95% or more of all problems in the cable plant. Crimp on connectors fall into the above category.

I could see why crimp-on connectors would be a problem. If you buy at Home Depot, you have to know what the "center of ferrule" is (note that "number two" in the picture is only the center of three segments that may or may not be considered the ferrule) and guess whether the connector is for quad shield or something less, and if you buy at Radio Shack, you have to guess whether the Radio Shack cable stripper will work. Here's a complaint that I tried sending to Radio Shack just as my time ran out on the library computer. I don't know if they received it, but I didn't receive an e-mail confirmation.

quote:
I bought a package of RadioShack RG-6 crimp-on connectors (278-0231) and a RadioShack cable stripper (278-248) that are supposed to work together, but they don't. The package of the stripper says "for use with RG-6" but the instructions inside say it only strips in lengths of 4, 6, 8, and 12mm, which isn't consistant with the connectors which require a 9.5mm cut exposing the wire, and a 3.2mm cut of the outter jacket and shield. I would like a refund, but I don't have the receipt for the stripper. This is false advertising.
I could make marks at the proper points on the cable and remove one of the cutters of the cable stripper, but then it wouldn't be worth $15 to me. It's supposed to be able to make both cuts at once, but there's no indication of whether the two blades could be moved close enough together for that. I'm going to use a hobby knife and lay some kind of spacers on the table to strip the cable.

In canada the cable companies have switched to the compression fittings from the last 15 yrs. they are called snap and seal and manufactured by a company called tomas and betts, or better known as T&B

Hope This Helps


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
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reply to Borad
I just use a utility knife to strip the cable then two channel lock pliers to put the compression end on.

Can't tell which ones the cable co put on and which ones I put on.
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CompTIA Network+ Certified


INtheKnow

@charter.com
said by TheTechGuru:

I just use a utility knife to strip the cable then two channel lock pliers to put the compression end on.

Can't tell which ones the cable co put on and which ones I put on.

Please don't follow this advice. Proper tools are neccessary to do the job corectly. Using a knife to prep coax cable scores the center conductor resulting in reflections and possibly a standing wave due to the skin effect of RF. These will cause slow data speeds, dropped packets, and loss of digital channels. so while it may look the same it will not perform the same.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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said by INtheKnow :

said by TheTechGuru:

I just use a utility knife to strip the cable then two channel lock pliers to put the compression end on.

Can't tell which ones the cable co put on and which ones I put on.

Please don't follow this advice. Proper tools are neccessary to do the job corectly. Using a knife to prep coax cable scores the center conductor resulting in reflections and possibly a standing wave due to the skin effect of RF. These will cause slow data speeds, dropped packets, and loss of digital channels. so while it may look the same it will not perform the same.

Um no it don't, my utility knife never touches the center conductor, you only need to go about half way though the center insulation to then be able to twist it off by hand.
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CompTIA Network+ Certified

krommulent

join:2010-04-07
reply to Borad
fine. yours don't but you're a guru. the op is probably not seeing as he came here for some help. proper tools will allow a novice the chance to do the job proper.

Borad

join:2012-06-08
The "proper" tools I've seen have the issues I mentioned. For now, I intend to do it as TheTechGuru does it. If I had to put connectors on often, I'd keep looking for a good combination of tool and connector, but I tried twice with no luck.


INtheKnow

@charter.com
Home Depot or Lowes has the tools/kit to do the job correctly for around $50 - $70 online. If this is too much of an investment then why not have the cable co come do it for you? The service fee will probably be somewhere in the same neighborhood. And based on this thread ( no disrespect intended but I deal with it every day ) you will end up calling for a service call anyway or the cable co will come put a noise trap on your line in the middle of the night and you will be upset and without service.
Good Luck


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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reply to Borad
said by Borad:

The "proper" tools I've seen have the issues I mentioned. For now, I intend to do it as TheTechGuru does it. If I had to put connectors on often, I'd keep looking for a good combination of tool and connector, but I tried twice with no luck.

»www.monoprice.com/products/produ···format=2

»www.monoprice.com/products/produ···format=2
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CompTIA Network+ Certified

Borad

join:2012-06-08
reply to INtheKnow
I tried Home Depot in person (see first post) and they didn't have the ideal crimp tool mentioned on their connectors. I could have ordered online, but returning is harder. As I said, it's easy to put on a new connector if I have to.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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You should order those from MonoPrice, they are cheap enough to not be a big loss if they don't work out but they should the blue compression tool looks exactly like the blue one Charter (FiberTech) around here uses.
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CompTIA Network+ Certified


INtheKnow

@charter.com
reply to Borad
What you are refusing to hear is that you need to take those crimp on connectors and throw them as far into the lake as you can. No compentent technician has used that type of connector for 15 to 20 yrs. hinse why you cant find that type of tool.

Borad

join:2012-06-08
This reminds me of the advice to not staple data cable. Cablevision stapled my TV cable and none of the cable is crushed. The staples even leave the cable loose in many spots, and the cable could be stapled snug against the corner so it looks nicer compared with plastic nail-in staples. (a stapler with adjustable force helps, and you have to change the force when you go through different material).

If crimping makes the metal shield go through the foam and touch the wire, I could see how that would be a problem. Also, if crimping distorts the shield enough in an area where there's interference from a power cable or something, that could be a problem. I think the solution is proper measurement when stripping the cable, proper selection of the stripper and connector, and proper testing of the crimped cable (visually for TV, and maybe by checking speed with data.)

The stripper and plug manufacturers and sellers need a kick somewhere for the lack of compatability between their strippers and plugs and/or their bad instructions. I may complain to the BBB about Radio Shack's crimper not working, as far as I could tell from the instructions, with their plugs.

anie

join:2012-08-08
38000
reply to Borad
I have a pack of old coaxial connectors that says to crimp twice and it specifies the rings to crimp. I had no problem with that, but I just bought a pack of connectors at Home Depot (pictured) and I don't know what to do. Should I just crimp at the number 2 or should I crimp 1 and 3? I don't have the IDEAL crimp tool mentioned. Home Depot didn't even have it. I have the right size crimper though.

Borad

join:2012-06-08
reply to Borad
said by Borad:

Cablevision stapled my TV cable and none of the cable is crushed.

Correction: I started removing the cable they stapled and noticed some staple marks on the cable and in one case a staple went through the cable jacket, so it's possible to staple correctly but they didn't.

I added the "heavy duty" crimp-on connectors and they seem tight enough and the cable works, though I don't like the look of the fit and I have to "compress" them on, so I think a compression tool is a good idea.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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1 edit
said by Borad:

said by Borad:

Cablevision stapled my TV cable and none of the cable is crushed.

Correction: I started removing the cable they stapled and noticed some staple marks on the cable and in one case a staple went through the cable jacket, so it's possible to staple correctly but they didn't.

I added the "heavy duty" crimp-on connectors and they seem tight enough and the cable works, though I don't like the look of the fit and I have to "compress" them on, so I think a compression tool is a good idea.

The compression tool just pushes the plastic ring in. Getting the connector well into the coax requires lots of twisting and pushing by hand, has nothing to do with the tool.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDS8uinV7oQ


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Borad

join:2012-06-08
said by TheTechGuru:

The compression tool just pushes the plastic ring in. Getting the connector well into the coax requires lots of twisting and pushing by hand, has nothing to do with the tool.

Oh. :\

Anyway, I'm thinking of creating a Youtube account so I could comment on the video and vote on comments. Someone commented that you shouldn't remove the foil, but the instructions on my connectors say:

quote:
1. Strip off all insulation and shield so that 3/8" (9.5mm) of the center conductor is exposed.

2. Now strip off 1/8" (3.2mm) of the outer jacket and shield
And the illustrations show a bare dielectric and a bare conductor. Nothing even folded back. Just cut.

I want to give a big thumbs up to Bdubslawman who said:
quote:
I wish you were MUCH Clearer on your site for which accesories I should or could buy with each of the various F type connectiors. NOT REPEAT NOT what "other people bought" but WHAT EXACTLY the correct 2 or 3 crimpers or cutters / stripper tools should be bought or considered when buying this ends vs another type..

When I select the ends, I'd like a list of EXACTLY the correct crimpers or other compression, or cutting / wire stripping tools that would go with or make my assembly easier.
I thought my only problem was finding a stripper that stripped properly for my connectors (see above connector instructions) but last night I tested my crimps more carefully and found that they're as loose as they looked. I had to use the RG-59 hexagon on my crimper to get the RG-6 plug tight enough so it wouldn't easily spin around the cable when twisted, but not apply too much pressure or it would crack. It shouldn't take this kind of finesse. It seems to have worked and I'm on the internet at home for the first time in months, but I have no confidence that the connectors are on properly.