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robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to marti

Re: Result of AC drip pan overflow -- cracked ceiling

One thing to remember if this ever happens again. Just as important as putting the bucket under it is to punch a hole through it so it will drain. Use a screwdriver or anything like that to create a small hole. The water will drain off the top of the Sheetrock faster and will not do as much damage.


ndt

join:2008-08-22
Picayune, MS
reply to marti
I had a similar problem with a hot water heater in the attic.I had noticed water draining outside but didn't think much about it because I thought it was A/C condensation.(stupid).

When I realized that the A/C hadn't been on for a couple of weeks,since the weather cooled off,I got my ladder and got into the attic.The relief valve on the water heater had gone bad and was leaking into the drip pan ,then going outside.

Son-in-Law replaced valve and cleaned up the rest of the water in the pan.I got two of those battery powered water alarms at home depot and put one in the water heater pan and A/C pan.

I didn't know about auxillary drains at the time,but I know where both are now.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to marti
said by marti:

No float device is installed in drip pan -- I don't think they are commonly used in this area. AC/heater company does put those tablets in the drain each year when they come out to check the systems.

Not installing a switch is a retarded move for whomever installed the system. But then all those $10 saved....

disy

join:2003-01-02
Norwalk, CT
reply to marti
Use a gallo gun on the condensation line a couple times a year and it comes in handy when the line does actually clog - will save you a service trip. Also have an automatic shut off put on the unit or you can just put a water sensor in the drip pan.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to marti
said by marti:

No float device is installed in drip pan -- I don't think they are commonly used in this area. AC/heater company does put those tablets in the drain each year when they come out to check the systems.

It has little to do with region. Any time condensate will be above a critical area, it should be installed. Even if they don't usually install them where you live, having one would have saved you a lot of hassle and money, eh?

bkjohnson
Premium
join:2002-05-22
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to Mentat
Thanks! Actually, I use the shop vac where the drains exit the house by making a seal with my hands. I tried it once on an "emergency" basis, and it worked so well that I continue to do it. The vac pulls all sorts of stuff through the line until just clear water appears. I might add that having a water alarm under my water heater, which, for reasons unknown, is in the attic, alerted me to a leak which I was able to deal with before it became a serious problem..

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to disy
said by disy:

Use a gallo gun

I had to look this up!

I have an air compressor and a portable air tank but haven't used it with my drain lines because...the installer put my Tee in-line AFTER the P-trap (where a clog would normally reside) and applying compressed air would then (wouldn't it) blow the mold/mildew/algae/crapola back-in to the A-coil housing.

Do y'all's drain lines always have the access port (Tee, for pouring in liquid I presume) BEFORE the p-trap?


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to marti
Years ago(when women were nice, I know a long long time ago and it was only 1 day) when freon was cheap a blasted evey spring to clean out algae


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
R11 used to be a great tool cleaner. But that was before it created global warming with every other thing in the world.

disy

join:2003-01-02
Norwalk, CT
reply to laserfan
I honestly do not know tee trap from p trap - sorry - I use the gallo gun because it has the perfect size nozzle to fit the drain pipe in the AC unit and I blow it out versus, blowing it in - not sure if this makes sense or not - also the gun is just a quick blast of air versus a compressor, which i think could be too much pressure on the piping

jsbaker

join:2002-07-13
Houston, TX
reply to marti
I had my secondary pan replaced last year at the same time they were replacing the condensing unit that the compressor locked up in a hour after I closed on the house. They replaced the pan and both condensate lines and ran the primary and secondary both outside. When they quoted to replace the pan they refused to do the job if I would not add the float switch. It was a $25 no brainer


brhalltx
Premium
join:2002-12-09
Cypress, TX
reply to marti
said by marti:

No float device is installed in drip pan -- I don't think they are commonly used in this area.

Both of my AC units have them... Along with secondary drains that exit in a conspicuous area.


marti
Color outside the lines
Premium,MVM
join:2001-12-14
Houston, TX
kudos:5
reply to marti
Hi everyone! I had the ceiling repaired over the weekend. I called the AC company this week and asked about the float shut-off device. Yes they have them. I plan to have one installed toward the end of this month when I have a better cash flow (flowing in).

Thanks for all of the discussion in this thread!
--
Team Discovery


builderbob

@cox.net

limit switch styles

$20 part. two styles below. first is installed in the drainline and is more sensitive to line blockage problems. the second mounts on the side of the pan and will activate after pan starts to catch water leakage (line blockage.) I've seen homes with both installed in series. if you have unit checked next spring, have one installed at same time.

»www.acunitdirect.com/model-ss1-l···tch.html

»www.bonanza.com/listings/HVAC-AI···/1312583


Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Draiman

Re: Result of AC drip pan overflow -- cracked ceiling

said by Draiman:

The most common thing I hear is pour warm bleach down the drain once or twice a year.

Perhaps this is a stupid question, but why WARM bleach?

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
said by Nick_L:

why WARM bleach?

Probably just because it would have a slightly greater "washdown" effect, i.e. the bleach kills the algae/mildew and the warmer it is the better job it does of carrying away the dirt in the line(s).

My bleach bottles are in an outside Rubbermaid storage unit, so my bleach is already VERY warm (it's 100deg here all summer)!


pike
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-01
Washington, DC
kudos:3
reply to marti
It has been my understanding that heating bleach will have the effect of rapid decomposition of the chlorine in to a toxic gas, diminishing or even eliminating its ability to disinfect.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by pike:

It has been my understanding that heating bleach will have the effect of rapid decomposition of the chlorine in to a toxic gas, diminishing or even eliminating its ability to disinfect.

quote:
Way back in the old days people would literally boil their clothes to make sure they were clean and sanitized. It seems our ancestors had the right idea. Studies have shown that hot water is a naturally hostile environment for germs and other microbes, essentially killing them off. These same studies also concluded that, to effectively do this, the temperature of the hot water needs to be between 178F and 194F. The problem here is that washing machines in most homes heat water to a maximum of 140F, not quite hot enough. An obvious solution is to add bleach to your laundry. Known for its ability to sterilize, bleach can augment the disinfecting power of hot water, but should be used only if the fabrics being washed will allow it. Some fibers such as silk, wool, and many of today's popular spandex blends cannot tolerate such a caustic agent and they tend to weaken and break down when bleach is used. The solution to this dilemma is to use a detergent that is gentle enough for finer fabrics, but equally tough to both clean and disinfect your laundry (FULLER 86 Powder Laundry Detergent). And, keep in mind, hot water will boost the cleaning power of any laundry detergent.
Microbial Disinfection By Hot Water


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to pike
said by pike:

It has been my understanding that heating bleach will have the effect of rapid decomposition of the chlorine in to a toxic gas, diminishing or even eliminating its ability to disinfect.

Extreme heat, such as exposing it to flame will do that, and boiling it will decompose it. But warming it, such as with hot water, does not hurt its properties.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by Lurch77:

said by pike:

It has been my understanding that heating bleach will have the effect of rapid decomposition of the chlorine in to a toxic gas, diminishing or even eliminating its ability to disinfect.

Extreme heat, such as exposing it to flame will do that, and boiling it will decompose it. But warming it, such as with hot water, does not hurt its properties.

Heating bleach and water enhances the solutions ability to disinfect.

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to Nick_L
I would only add that "contact time" is important to chlorine's ability to disinfect. So if a clog is in a drain line's P-trap you only need to add enough bleach to fill the P-trap. Then let it sit for a while so it has some time to work. Longer is better.


Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to marti
Interesting info, thanks guys.