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Anonymuss

@rogers.com
reply to sm5w2

Re: How to get Bell to fix problems with POTS line?

Sounds like a partial open/loose connection related to thermal expansion/contraction.

There is no specific device or equipment that can be used to detect non existant problems.

If we can't see the problem at the time, we can't fix it.

We CAN blindly change things and hope that solves the problem, but with performance numbers restricting us to less than 1hr 30mins per job, we don't have time to just play around.


sm5w2
Premium
join:2004-10-13
St Thomas, ON
> There is no specific device or equipment that can be used to detect non existant problems.

I thought there was a gizmo (reflectance meter?) that can tell you that the wire has a problem so-many-feet from the test point. ???

And why can't the drop be disconnected at both ends and then metered to ground to see if there's a low-resistance path to ground (indicating an insulation break) ???

And while the drop is disconnected at both ends, short the wires together at one end and then measure the loop resistance at the other end and see if it meets spec. ???

Why wouldn't it be normal or standard to do ANY of those things after, say, the 3'rd or 4'th call ?!?!?!

Or perhaps the line technicians have little to no understanding of basic electrical theory?


Anonymuss

@rogers.com
said by sm5w2:

> There is no specific device or equipment that can be used to detect non existant problems.

I thought there was a gizmo (reflectance meter?) that can tell you that the wire has a problem so-many-feet from the test point. ???

You're probably thinking of a TDR (time-domain reflectometer), but I'm not sure if it will do exactly what you're thinking it will.

Besides not all techs have a meter capable of that test, only IPTV guys would.

Even those who do have the meter hardware capable of doing that, the TDR software app on the meter has been disabled by Bell in the firmware because they feel it's too advanced for us to be using and wouldn't understand it because it's not part of the training, or they never purchased it as part of the software package to the meter for the same reason, so that menu option is greyed out and you can't access it.

said by sm5w2:

And why can't the drop be disconnected at both ends and then metered to ground to see if there's a low-resistance path to ground (indicating an insulation break) ???

This can be done without disconnecting the drop, and would measure the drop and the sections beyond. If the tech doesn't see anything when all the sections are connected together, he's not going to see anything on just the drop.

said by sm5w2:

And while the drop is disconnected at both ends, short the wires together at one end and then measure the loop resistance at the other end and see if it meets spec. ???

This actually isn't a standard test, and there certainly isn't a spec for it, but I do this on ocassion when I suspect it is needed to check for a partial open.

Find out the gauge of copper inside the drop, measure the drop length, look up online the ohms per foot reading for that gauge, times it by how many feet the drop is, then double it for the round trip.

Take that number down, and the next time a tech is out, see if he's willing to try looking for a short on the far end that matches near the number you've got.

said by sm5w2:

Why wouldn't it be normal or standard to do ANY of those things after, say, the 3'rd or 4'th call ?!?!?!

Have your calls been towards the end of the day? Try booking a morning call so the tech isn't thinking about rushing to get home.

said by sm5w2:

Or perhaps the line technicians have little to no understanding of basic electrical theory?

In all honesty, most don't. Alot of guys can't even spell.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
reply to sm5w2
said by sm5w2:

I thought there was a gizmo (reflectance meter?) that can tell you that the wire has a problem so-many-feet from the test point. ???

The problem with TDR and most other troubleshooting tools/techniques is that none of them will reliably locate intermittent problems while they are absent if the line goes back within specs between occurences.

That's what makes intermittent problems so troublesome.

mintaka905

join:2006-11-03
Holland Landing, ON
reply to Anonymuss
Oh right only 1 30min. hahaha... never heard of anyone at bell fired for taking the time to fix the job.

line is half open, can be found if the tech cares to follow up with the customer.

WTF.

mintaka905

join:2006-11-03
Holland Landing, ON
reply to Anonymuss
ha ha ha rushing home. what are you doing on a pole in the dark anyway? ha hah haha ha