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INtheKnow

@charter.com
reply to Borad

Re: How do you crimp?

What you are refusing to hear is that you need to take those crimp on connectors and throw them as far into the lake as you can. No compentent technician has used that type of connector for 15 to 20 yrs. hinse why you cant find that type of tool.


Borad

join:2012-06-08

This reminds me of the advice to not staple data cable. Cablevision stapled my TV cable and none of the cable is crushed. The staples even leave the cable loose in many spots, and the cable could be stapled snug against the corner so it looks nicer compared with plastic nail-in staples. (a stapler with adjustable force helps, and you have to change the force when you go through different material).

If crimping makes the metal shield go through the foam and touch the wire, I could see how that would be a problem. Also, if crimping distorts the shield enough in an area where there's interference from a power cable or something, that could be a problem. I think the solution is proper measurement when stripping the cable, proper selection of the stripper and connector, and proper testing of the crimped cable (visually for TV, and maybe by checking speed with data.)

The stripper and plug manufacturers and sellers need a kick somewhere for the lack of compatability between their strippers and plugs and/or their bad instructions. I may complain to the BBB about Radio Shack's crimper not working, as far as I could tell from the instructions, with their plugs.


Borad

join:2012-06-08

said by Borad:

Cablevision stapled my TV cable and none of the cable is crushed.

Correction: I started removing the cable they stapled and noticed some staple marks on the cable and in one case a staple went through the cable jacket, so it's possible to staple correctly but they didn't.

I added the "heavy duty" crimp-on connectors and they seem tight enough and the cable works, though I don't like the look of the fit and I have to "compress" them on, so I think a compression tool is a good idea.


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
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1 edit

said by Borad:

said by Borad:

Cablevision stapled my TV cable and none of the cable is crushed.

Correction: I started removing the cable they stapled and noticed some staple marks on the cable and in one case a staple went through the cable jacket, so it's possible to staple correctly but they didn't.

I added the "heavy duty" crimp-on connectors and they seem tight enough and the cable works, though I don't like the look of the fit and I have to "compress" them on, so I think a compression tool is a good idea.

The compression tool just pushes the plastic ring in. Getting the connector well into the coax requires lots of twisting and pushing by hand, has nothing to do with the tool.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDS8uinV7oQ


--
CompTIA Network+ Certified

Borad

join:2012-06-08

said by TheTechGuru:

The compression tool just pushes the plastic ring in. Getting the connector well into the coax requires lots of twisting and pushing by hand, has nothing to do with the tool.

Oh. :\

Anyway, I'm thinking of creating a Youtube account so I could comment on the video and vote on comments. Someone commented that you shouldn't remove the foil, but the instructions on my connectors say:

quote:
1. Strip off all insulation and shield so that 3/8" (9.5mm) of the center conductor is exposed.

2. Now strip off 1/8" (3.2mm) of the outer jacket and shield
And the illustrations show a bare dielectric and a bare conductor. Nothing even folded back. Just cut.

I want to give a big thumbs up to Bdubslawman who said:
quote:
I wish you were MUCH Clearer on your site for which accesories I should or could buy with each of the various F type connectiors. NOT REPEAT NOT what "other people bought" but WHAT EXACTLY the correct 2 or 3 crimpers or cutters / stripper tools should be bought or considered when buying this ends vs another type..

When I select the ends, I'd like a list of EXACTLY the correct crimpers or other compression, or cutting / wire stripping tools that would go with or make my assembly easier.
I thought my only problem was finding a stripper that stripped properly for my connectors (see above connector instructions) but last night I tested my crimps more carefully and found that they're as loose as they looked. I had to use the RG-59 hexagon on my crimper to get the RG-6 plug tight enough so it wouldn't easily spin around the cable when twisted, but not apply too much pressure or it would crack. It shouldn't take this kind of finesse. It seems to have worked and I'm on the internet at home for the first time in months, but I have no confidence that the connectors are on properly.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

said by Borad:

...It seems to have worked and I'm on the internet at home for the first time in months, but I have no confidence that the connectors are on properly.

Since you have service problems, call your service provider and they'll fix it correctly.

If your connectors are as loose as you say, they're leaking signal out and in. You're going to have more problems, cause problems for others, and/or get shut off for causing ingress/leakage problems.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.

Borad

join:2012-06-08

1 edit

said by DrDrew:

Since you have service problems, call your service provider and they'll fix it correctly.

If your connectors are as loose as you say, they're leaking signal out and in. You're going to have more problems, cause problems for others, and/or get shut off for causing ingress/leakage problems.

I'll buy better tools if I start worrying about that. It would be cheaper than a $40 house call.

I may end up trying to get Cablevision to do about 5 minutes of what they call "custom wiring" for cable TV because the management office of my building won't let me touch the raceway in the hallway, but Cablevision "usually" doesn't do it 15 years after installation. They may not even have the size drill bit I'd need for a hole large enough to maintain a bend radius of over 1 1/2". I don't think they care much about the bend radius because they used a 1" bend radius by bending a RG-6 cable 180 degrees within a 2" raceway. They should have shortened that cable instead of bending it over itself like that. They'd probably give me an argument if I told them to do these things and I'd probably end up giving them a tip on top of the $40.