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Rekrul

join:2007-04-21
Milford, CT

1 recommendation

...

"Welcome to Bob's orchard! Here's your bushel basket. Now remember, you're only allowed to put three apples in it! Enjoy!"

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: ...

said by Rekrul:

"Welcome to Bob's orchard! Here's your bushel basket. Now remember, you're only allowed to put three apples in it! Enjoy!"

You're analogy is wrong. Is the basket infinite? Nope. It has a limited capacity otherwise known as a CAP. Once you fill the basket you can only get more apples unless you pay for another basket.

Show me a "pick your own" farm that lets you pick as much as you want for one price. I actually go to these places and none of them have that business model.
TheRogueX

join:2003-03-26
Springfield, MO

Re: ...

Well, no, his analogy is actually somewhat OK because he said the basket is a 'bushel' basket (implying that the basket can hold 48lbs of apples), but you can only put three apples in it, not that the basket is infinite.
Rekrul

join:2007-04-21
Milford, CT
said by 88615298:

You're analogy is wrong. Is the basket infinite? Nope. It has a limited capacity otherwise known as a CAP. Once you fill the basket you can only get more apples unless you pay for another basket.

Exactly! The basket has a built-in limit. If the orchard is charging you a set price and providing you with a container you should be allowed to use it to capacity. If they don't want you to take that much, they shouldn't give you such a large container in the first place. It makes absolutely no sense to give you a container capable of holding dozens of apples, and then telling you that you can only put three in it. The normal reaction of most people would be "Why are you giving me this huge basket if I'm not allowed to use it?"

In the same way that the basket has a built-in limit, every internet account also has a built-in limit, which can be computed with: ??mb x 60 seconds x 60 minutes x 24 hours x 30 days. Plug in your connection speed, then convert the result from megabits to megabytes, and that's your account's built-in limit.

Unless the ISPs have some really stupid engineers working for them, they already know this. They knew when they created the various speed tiers, exactly how much bandwidth they were selling to their customers. The accounts are already capped by practical limits.

ISPs are some of the most deceptive businesses around. They want you to pay for fast service, but they don't want you to actually use it.

Who's going to pay for 100Mb service to check their email? Or watch YouTube videos? Hell, you don't even need 50Mb service for that.

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: ...

said by Rekrul:

Exactly! The basket has a built-in limit. If the orchard is charging you a set price and providing you with a container you should be allowed to use it to capacity

You're still off. First you say the basket is speed then you say the basket is data. 2 different things. Your analogy only works if the ISP sells you a 100 Mbps speed tier then says you can only use 12 Mbps. The speed limit on the interstate has nothing to do with how many miles I can drive.
Rekrul

join:2007-04-21
Milford, CT

Re: ...

said by 88615298:

You're still off. First you say the basket is speed then you say the basket is data. 2 different things. Your analogy only works if the ISP sells you a 100 Mbps speed tier then says you can only use 12 Mbps.

No, my analogy is fine the way it is.

The basket is speed and the apples are data. You're given a large basket that can hold many apples, but are then artificially limited to a very small number of apples.

A fast internet account gives you the capability to download large amounts of data and then the ISP artificially limits you to a small fraction of that amount.

Data is determined by speed.

I have a 30Mb account. That's 30 megabits a second, which works out to 3.75 megabytes a second. In other words, my account is capped at 3.75MB a second.

There are 60 seconds in a minute, so if you multiply 3.75MB by 60, you get 225MB. In other words, my account is capped at 225MB a minute.

There are 60 minutes in an hour, so if you multiply 225MB by 60, you get 13,500MB, or 13.18GB. In other words, my account is capped at 13.18GB an hour.

There are 24 hours in a day, so if you multiply 13.18GB by 24, you get 316.32GB. In other words, my account is capped at 316.32GB a day.

There are 30 days in the average month, so if you multiply 316.32GB by 30, you get 9,489.6GB or 9.27TB. In other words, my account is capped at 9.27TB a month.

In other words, my ISP knowingly sold me a service with the capability to download as much as 9.27TB in a single month.

If they were to impose a 300MB per month usage cap, they would be restricting my usage of the service to 3.33% of what it's capable of.

In other words, I would only be able to fill my basket to 1/3 of its total volume, completely negating the need for such a large basket in the first place.

P.S.

Can someone please explain to me why every email alert I get for this thread contains an invalid link?