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golfer55

join:2009-12-25
Grottoes, VA
reply to boaterbob

Re: 50 or 70 pint dehumidifier

since you will be draining it with a hose save some $$$ and get the smaller capacity one

boaterbob
Premium
join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC
Just found this answer at Frigidaire Web site:
The capacity of the dehumidifier unit refers to the amount of moisture the unit can remove from the air in a 24-hour period. For example, a 30 pint dehumidifier will remove up to 30 pints of moisture from the air in a 24-hour period, until the desired humidity level in the room is reached and if the bucket is emptied regularly.

So, I should have checked first

iknow
Premium
join:2012-03-25
said by boaterbob:

Just found this answer at Frigidaire Web site:
The capacity of the dehumidifier unit refers to the amount of moisture the unit can remove from the air in a 24-hour period. For example, a 30 pint dehumidifier will remove up to 30 pints of moisture from the air in a 24-hour period, until the desired humidity level in the room is reached and if the bucket is emptied regularly.

So, I should have checked first

unless you want to use it for the winter, a small window AC is better, it operates the same as a dehumidifier except you have the hot air from the condensor going outside instead of heating up the house.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly. Plus many spaces, like a basement, are not well suited for installation of a window unit. And the space gets very cold as it runs so much to remove the humidity.

iknow
Premium
join:2012-03-25
said by Lurch77:

Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly. Plus many spaces, like a basement, are not well suited for installation of a window unit. And the space gets very cold as it runs so much to remove the humidity.

you'd think they would not change the temperature significantly by design, but every one i've used makes it hot as hell in the room it's in. also, in the summer, it gets too hot in my basement for comfort, so an AC cools and removes the humidity there, makes it quite dry actually, without being too cold. this does depend on a particular situation, but it seems a waste to use a dehumidifier, then the AC has to remove that heat.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
reply to Lurch77
The FAD704DUD is spec'ed at 765 Watts. That heat goes into the house (and if you have central A/C, will need to be removed by the cantral A/C). So that's like having ten 75 Watt light bulbs running in your basement all the time.

iknow
Premium
join:2012-03-25
said by Bob4:

The FAD704DUD is spec'ed at 765 Watts. That heat goes into the house (and if you have central A/C, will need to be removed by the cantral A/C). So that's like having ten 75 Watt light bulbs running in your basement all the time.

my 8000 BTU AC only draws 816 WATTS and it cools the air.


norbert26
Premium
join:2010-08-10
Warwick, RI
reply to iknow
said by iknow:

said by Lurch77:

Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly. Plus many spaces, like a basement, are not well suited for installation of a window unit. And the space gets very cold as it runs so much to remove the humidity.

you'd think they would not change the temperature significantly by design, but every one i've used makes it hot as hell in the room it's in. also, in the summer, it gets too hot in my basement for comfort, so an AC cools and removes the humidity there, makes it quite dry actually, without being too cold. this does depend on a particular situation, but it seems a waste to use a dehumidifier, then the AC has to remove that heat.

i have found this to be true the dehumidifier will output heat. But there is a mystery i can't solve . Years ago in the house i grew up in there was an old sears coldspot or kennmore . There was no AC anywhere in the house. When the humidity hit the dehumidifier was run. During a heatwave since there was no AC in the house the finished basement was the retreat. With the dehumidifier running that basement never got hot and either did i feel any hot air coming out of it. This took in air through the front panel where there were louvers. The air blew out the back. At the bottom in the rear was the condensate pan you emptied (there was a hose provision but the drain pan was used) It collected condensate fine. For the life of me i can't figure out WHAT was different about that made in USA dehumidifier VS the dehumidifier on the market imported from china today. In theory a dehumidifier is a dehumidifier and should work the same now as it did then.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
I assume that was due to size and efficiency. The electrical energy consumed by the dehumidifier will heat the space. How much depends on: how much energy is consumed by the dehumidifier, how large the room is, and are they sinks/sources of heat. In a basement ground temperature is usually lower then air so added heat will flow through the walls into the surrounding soil.

We have a unit in our basement and while the heat is noticeable while it is running on balance the lower humidity improves comfort. Unfortunately our basement is fairly well connected to the 1st floor so humidity levels are greatly influenced by weather conditions.

/tom

Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota
reply to norbert26
My guess is that newer units remove considerably more humidity than those made a couple of generations ago. The process of converting water vapor to a liquid state releases heat. This heat energy as well as the heat generated due to inefficiencies in the unit itself are released into the room.

Water vapor will only condense onto another surface when that surface is cooler than the dew point temperature, or when the water vapor equilibrium in air has been exceeded. When water vapor condenses onto a surface, a net warming occurs on that surface. The water molecule brings heat energy with it.

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_vapor

The enthalpy of condensation (or heat of condensation) is by definition equal to the enthalpy of vaporization with the opposite sign: enthalpy changes of vaporization are always positive (heat is absorbed by the substance), whereas enthalpy changes of condensation are always negative (heat is released by the substance).

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enthalpy_o···rization

For even more exciting reading......

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latent_heat
--
Zach


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
I live it everyday. And it is still extremely boring to read.


norbert26
Premium
join:2010-08-10
Warwick, RI
reply to Zach1
Well mystery solved. That dehumidifier from years ago must have been low power. The house only had 60 AMP service and the condensate pan was not that large. Fast forward to the present. A year and a half ago i bought a dehumidifier to boost / assist an AC in an adjoining room . The room i placed the dehumidifier in has those sliding windows that are a PITA to mount a window shaker in. I put the AC window shaker in the adjoining room and it cools both rooms. Sometimes if humidity is extreme (like during the night) the AC will cool but it may get humid in the other room. I set the dehumidifier at 60% so it wont run too long and not get too hot. I made the mistake of the dehumidifier being over sized at 70 pints . Now i know i needed it smaller but whats done is done now i will live with it. All this said they have combo AC / dehumidifiers on the market. These have a big heat exhaust hose you can run to a window and exhaust the heat to the outside. If its damp / cool you can run it as a standard dehumidifier. This would address the issue of heat build up. The ones i have seen do about 12,000 BTUs but this will work where you can't install a window shaker.


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to Lurch77
said by Lurch77:

Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly.

Not for any that I have had and I have had to run dehumidifiers for the last 5+ years in a specific room (main room - not basement) and the temps are up by 5-7 degrees easy.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by CylonRed:

said by Lurch77:

Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly.

Not for any that I have had and I have had to run dehumidifiers for the last 5+ years in a specific room (main room - not basement) and the temps are up by 5-7 degrees easy.

All you have to do is put your hand in the discharge air from the condenser to see it's warmer than room temperature which means it's warming the space.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
I did say significantly. We have one that runs in our crawlspace. It's not hot down there.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
said by Lurch77:

I did say significantly. We have one that runs in our crawlspace. It's not hot down there.

The crawl space is a big heat sink.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
reply to Lurch77
said by Lurch77:

Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly. Plus many spaces, like a basement, are not well suited for installation of a window unit. And the space gets very cold as it runs so much to remove the humidity.

I have a whirlpool and after running for 4 hours you can feel the temp change in the room and more so about 5 ft from the rear in that corner of the room.
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
I'll admit I don't work with small dehumidifiers directly, so I may have been wrong. The one we use is in a large enclosed crawl space, and I can't tell a temp different between using it or not.

The units I work on, such as those from Liebert, run the A/C system, then use electric reheat coils downstream to keep from dropping the space far below setpoint.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
When I lived at my condo and had it in the basement I don't think it had much of a temp change unless you ran it pretty much 24/7

Never did spend much time in the basement because of the radon.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to Subaru
said by Subaru:

said by Lurch77:

Most dehumidifiers pass the air first over the evaporator, then over the condenser. They shouldn't change the temperature of the space significantly. Plus many spaces, like a basement, are not well suited for installation of a window unit. And the space gets very cold as it runs so much to remove the humidity.

I have a whirlpool and after running for 4 hours you can feel the temp change in the room and more so about 5 ft from the rear in that corner of the room.

I have a Whirlpool also and running it on my glass enclosed porch it does raise the temperature. Also the discharge air off the condenser is warmer than the room temp so it has to be raising it.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
yeah same here